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Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

The modern global humanitarian system takes the form it does because it is underpinned by liberal world order. Now the viability of global liberal institutions is increasingly in doubt, a backlash against humanitarianism (and human rights) has gained momentum. I will argue that without liberal world order, global humanitarianism as we currently understand it is impossible, confronting humanitarians with an existential choice: how might they function in a world which doesn’t have liberal institutions at its core? The version of global humanitarianism with which we are familiar might not survive this transition, but maybe other forms of humanitarian action will emerge. What comes next might not meet the hopes of today’s humanitarians, however. The humanitarian alliance with liberalism is no accident, and if the world is less liberal, its version of humanitarian action is likely to be less liberal too. Nevertheless, humanitarianism will fare better than its humanist twin, human rights, in this new world.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

represented a final victory for Western liberal democracy – an unexpected Hegelian denouement in the knotweed of History. Their euphoria – albeit short-lived – provided the entrance music for a new ethical order, constructed by the US, with a basis in liberal humanitarian norms. Without any direct and immediate threat to its hegemony, the US merged its geostrategy with a humanitarian ethics. In 1991, after the Gulf War, the US invaded Iraq in the name of humanitarian concern. The following year, to the applause of numerous humanitarian NGOs, it led a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

, M. ( 2017 ), ‘ Social Media and Fake News in the 2016 Election ’, Journal of Economic Perspectives , 31 : 2 , 211 – 36 . Aly , H. ( 2017 ), ‘ Media Perspectives: A Means to an End? Creating a Market for Humanitarian News from Africa ’, in Bunce , M. , Franks , S. and Paterson , C. (eds), Africa’s Media Image in the 21st Century: From the ‘Heart of Darkness’ to ‘Africa Rising’ ( London : Routledge ), pp. 129 – 31 . Barthes , R. ( 1977 ), Image/Music/Text ( New York

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Carla Konta

In private correspondence, President Eisenhower reiterated that music was ‘a psychological tool’ able to ‘counteract the stereotypical perception of Americans as “bombastic, jingoistic, and totally devoted to the theories of force and power”,’ while Elmer Staats, executive officer at the National Security Council (NSC), called it ‘a secret weapon.’ 5 The program was amended in January 1961 by the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act, to a) ‘provide tours in countries abroad by creative and performing artists and athletes from the United States

in US public diplomacy in socialist Yugoslavia, 1950–70
Abstract only
Carla Konta

activities – from the reading room, the monthly exhibit, the English teaching, the occasional lectures, the translation program, to the movies and music section; and, secondly, on the program content. The latter certainly evolved over time; but, as Laura Belmonte has researched, its founding principles remained consistent. From Harry Truman to George Bush, US public diplomacy narratives promoted a substantial ‘belief in the universality of American freedom, democracy, and free enterprise.’ 10 USIS books on Yugoslav shelves related to general subjects in the fine arts

in US public diplomacy in socialist Yugoslavia, 1950–70
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

the pursuit of peace and uncovering how dance and music are globally recognised as important to the creation and expression of culture and in facilitating social cohesion. Recognising this, the chapter considers theories and practices of dance and peacebuilding alongside relevant key concepts, such as embodiment and empathy, in order to provide context for exploring dance and peacebuilding. We argue for recognising the important role of dance in encouraging diverse forms of communication, building relationships across difference and engaging the

in Dancing through the dissonance
Abstract only
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

, culture. 19 Likewise, for Grau, the power of dance is understood to reside in its capacity to bring together intellect, emotion and feeling. Dance is also deeply interconnected with music. There are strong interrelations between dance and music activities in practice, participation and performance. Likewise, rather than comparing or contrasting the benefits of dance and music in peacebuilding, here we seek to increase understanding of dance in peacebuilding while continuing to refine the broader

in Dancing through the dissonance
Elizabeth Dauphinée

seven-day period, DRAGAN NIKOLIĆ beat Galib MUSIĆ, a 60-year-old detainee by, among other things, kicking him and beating him with a metal pipe. During the beatings, DRAGAN NIKOLIĆ accused Galib MUSIĆ of asking a Muslim organization to come to expel the Serbs from Vlasenica. Each time DRAGAN NIKOLIĆ beat Galib MUSIĆ, MUSIĆ lost consciousness and, after approximately seven days, Galib MUSIĆ died. From early June until about 15 September 1992 many female detainees at Sušica camp were subjected to sexual assaults, including rapes and degrading physical and

in The ethics of researching war
Abstract only
Expanding geopolitical imaginations
Jen Bagelman

remaking. Second, I examine how sanctuary art in the form of détournement reroutes repetitive and exclusionary securitisation rituals. Third, I illustrate how sanctuary zines are mobilised as a resource to visually communicate and insist upon all having a ‘right to have rights’ (Arendt, 1973a ). Fourth, I explore how sanctuary music performs an affective role in forging intersectional and unexpected solidarities. Finally, I show how sanctuary art in the form of poetry plays an intimate role in holding a space for testimony and challenging delimited

in Sanctuary cities and urban struggles
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

I think being young … I think my generation gets a lot of heat for being the ‘me generation’ and focusing on … Facebook or how involved we are with the Internet or on music or whatever. But I think that there are some really powerful people who are doing some really impressive things and I just want to be a part of that. I see that there is all this opportunity … I think the first step is educating yourself about just what is going on and then how you can help fix it

in Dancing through the dissonance