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Gerry Smyth

5 Popular music and the Celtic Tiger Gerry Smyth Sing when you’re winning On 14 June 2012, the Republic of Ireland soccer team was comprehensively beaten 4–0 at the UEFA Euro Football Championships by the eventual winners, Spain. During an on-­the-­pitch post-­match interview for the UK’s ITV network, the Irish midfielder Keith Andrews praised the quality of the opposition as well as the ‘brilliant’ support of the Irish fans, who continued en masse to sing ‘The Fields of Athenry’ throughout the final minutes of the match. Coverage then returned to the studio

in From prosperity to austerity
A society in transition

In the last generation, Northern Ireland has undergone a tortuous yet remarkable process of social and political change. This book explores what Northern Ireland was like during violent conflict, and whether the situation is any different 'after the troubles'. It examines the political developments and divisions essential to a critical understanding of the nature of Northern Irish society. The book focuses a number of elements of popular cultural practice that are often overlooked when social scientists address Northern Ireland. Sport plays an important though often dispiriting role that in Northern Irish society. It looks at some of the problems and ways forward for transitional justice and memory work in Northern Ireland. The book reviews the history of strategic spatial policy in post-partition Northern Ireland. It draws on feminist scholarship to expose how explanations of the ethnic conflict that ignore gender are always partial. The book illustrates how feminist and gender politics are part of the political culture of Northern Ireland and offers conceptual resources to academics engaged in investigating the conflict. It further provides a brief outline of critical race theory (CRT) and the critique of whiteness therein before using it as a basis from which to examine the research literature on racism in Northern Ireland. The course that popular music has taken in Northern Ireland during 1990s of the peace process, is also considered and the most crucial issues of the peace process, police reform, are examined.

Essays to celebrate the life and work of Chris Wrigley

This book reflects upon the wide range of Chris Wrigley's research and publications in the study of the various aspects of British labour history. It presents a set of themes revolving around the British labour movement and the lives of those connected with it. The book begins with a discussion on biography in the shape of George Howell's work on trade unions and presents Herbert Gladstone's view that the unions emerged from the medieval workers guilds. Chris was also interested in political figures connected with progressivism and the labour movement, which is reflected in the examination of Gladstone's role in the Liberal Party. There is an examination of the Co-operative Party in the north-east of England, the 1911 National Insurance Act, and the relationship between the unions and the Labour Party. The inter-war British labour politics is covered by the disaffiliation of the Independent Labour Party (ILP) from the Labour Party and by a study of the Progressive League. British and German working class lives are compared in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Female trade unionism is dealt with a focus on Association of Women Clerks and Secretaries (AWCS). The contribution of the Lansburys is brought by an essay on the role of the family members in working-class politics, including women's enfranchisement. The book also deals with the attempt by the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) to engage with punk music, and ends with a discussion on the theme of Labour disunity.

Popular music
Sean Campbell and Gerry Smyth

M1426 - COULTER TEXT.qxp:GRAHAM Q7 17/7/08 08:02 Page 232 12 From shellshock rock to ceasefire sounds: popular music Sean Campbell and Gerry Smyth In recent years a number of authors have sought to establish popular music as an important element within the Irish critical imagination. They have done so because among the many achievements of international popular music studies has been an appreciation that this kind of cultural practice provides one of the key means for subjects to understand the world and themselves in relation to it. As Martin Stokes

in Northern Ireland after the troubles
Open Access (free)
In the beginning was song
Mads Qvortrup

6 Epilogue: in the beginning was song And the light shineth in the darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not. (John 1.5) We have (rather deliberately) said very little about the subject of music, as this is not obviously a part of Rousseau’s social philosophy. Yet music was – though scholars have often forgotten this1 – Rousseau’s main passion, and this passion spilled over into his political writings in more ways than one. Rousseau, the musician and note-copier, was an accidental philosopher. Had he not seen the prize question from the Academy in Dijon on

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Abstract only
‘Symbols of defiance’ from the print to the digital age
Matt Grimes and Tim Wall

15 Punk zines: ‘symbols of defiance’ from the print to the digital age Matt Grimes and Tim Wall In this chapter we examine the development of punk fanzines from the late 1970s to the present, exploring the role of these music fan-produced publications in giving meaning to the experience of a music community. This discussion of the punk fanzine’s longitudinal existence allows us to investigate the variety of ways that the fanzines and webzines make sense of punk as music, a set of political ideas and as a subcultural scene. In particular we want to trace the way

in Fight back
‘Crisis music’ and political ephemera in the emergent ‘structure of feeling’, 1976–83
Herbert Pimlott

14 ‘Militant entertainment’? ‘Crisis music’ and political ephemera in the emergent ‘structure of feeling’, 1976–83 Herbert Pimlott Images of riots, demonstrations and strikes from across the world in the ­aftermath of the 2008–09 global economic ‘meltdown’ and subsequent factory closures, bankruptcies and job losses, provoke a strong sense of déjà vu. Some thirty-odd years ago, during the first major economic downturn of the post-war era, job prospects dimmed and social unrest grew as a generation of workingclass school leavers, facing the worst unemployment

in Fight back
A socio-cultural critique of the Celtic Tiger and its aftermath

This book examines the phenomenon of the rise and fall of the Irish Celtic Tiger from a cultural perspective. It looks at Ireland's regression from prosperity to austerity in terms of a society as opposed to just an economy. Using literary and cultural theory, it looks at how this period was influenced by, and in its turn influenced, areas such as religion, popular culture, politics, literature, photography, gastronomy, music, theatre, poetry and film. It seeks to provide some answers as to what exactly happened to Irish society in the past few decades of boom and bust. The socio-cultural rather than the purely economic lens it uses to critique the Celtic Tiger is useful because society and culture are inevitably influenced by what happens in the economic sphere. That said, all of the measures taken in the wake of the financial crash sought to find solutions to aid the ailing economy, and the social and cultural ramifications were shamefully neglected. The aim of this book therefore is to bring the ‘Real’ of the socio-cultural consequences of the Celtic Tiger out of the darkness and to initiate a debate that is, in some respects, equally important as the numerous economic analyses of recent times. The essays analyse how culture and society are mutually-informing discourses and how this synthesis may help us to more fully understand what happened in this period, and more importantly, why it happened.

An interview with Jon Savage
Matthew Worley

, sought to ascertain Savage’s thoughts on the core themes of this book; that is, on punk’s import beyond the music and in terms of identity, space and communication. MW: One of the premises of the book is that punk was/is more than simply rock ’n’ roll. How far, if at all, do you think we can disentangle punk from punk rock? Afterword -305- JS: Well, at that time, music was the prime youth cultural focus. You know, it’s thirty-seven years ago and before many things. It’s pre the internet; it’s pre the great expansion in the mass media and the youth media. It’s pre

in Fight back
Exploring the articulation of identity by older women punks
Laura Way

research based on qualitative interviewing to consider the experiences of four older punk women. In so doing, it will be argued that women were and continue to be both active and public in their participation in the punk subculture; and that punk continues to form a fundamental part of their respective identities. The opening chords My earliest punk memory is whirling around the living room like a demented dervish to ‘Rock the Casbah’ by The Clash with my security blanket in tow. My childhood was punctuated throughout by music, from The Smiths on school mornings to my

in Fight back