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Snow in Arcadia: redrawing the English lyric landscape, 1586–95

It has traditionally been held that Robert Southwell's poetry offers a curious view of Elizabethan England from the restricted perspective of a priest-hole. This book takes apart that idea – and the poetry – word by word and discovers layers of new meanings, hidden emblems and sharp critiques of Elizabeth's courtiers, and even of the ageing queen herself. Using the most recent edition of Southwell's poetry and manuscript materials, it addresses both poetry and private writings, including letters and diary material, to give context to the radicalisation of a generation of Southwell's countrymen and women. The book shows how the young Jesuit harnessed both drama and literature to give new poetic poignancy to their experience. Bringing a forensic approach to Southwell's ‘lighter’ pieces, it shows the extent to which Southwell engaged exclusively through them in direct artistic debate with Spenser, Sidney and Shakespeare, placing the poetry firmly in the English landscape familiar to Southwell's generation. Those concerned with early modern and Elizabethan culture will find much of interest in this study, including insights into the function of the arts in the private Catholic milieu, touched by Southwell in so many ways and places, from William Byrd's holy music to Mary Stuart's coded embroideries.

This book presents a biography of the poetics and politics of London in 1613, from Whitehall to Guildhall, that is, Shakespeare's London. It examines major events at court, such as the untimely death of Prince Henry and its aftermath, and the extravagant wedding of Princess Elizabeth to Frederick of Germany and her journey to the Continent. The city flourished with scores of publications on a vast array of topics, including poetry, travel narratives, music, and, of course, plays. The book offers summaries and analyses of most of these texts, knowing that some of them may not be well-known to all readers. Many of these publications had a kind of link to the court. In order to understand the context of the year 1613, the book actually begins in October 1612 with Prince Henry's illness and death in November, which had a major impact on what happened in 1613. It proceeds more or less chronologically from this event to Princess Elizabeth's wedding and the stunning array of dramatic performances at court, and includes the journey to her new home in Germany. As part of the year's cultural nexus, the narrative reaches into the Guildhall experience to explore the riches of the books that emanated from London's printers and to examine specifically the drama performed or published in 1613. The final major focus centres on the Carr-Howard wedding at the year's end, full of cultural activities and ripe with political significance.

Musical comedy

‘If music be the food of love, play on.’ Twelfth Night Ever since the seventeenth century, Shakespeare’s plays have been adapted into musical forms, whether lyric, symphonic, balletic, or operatic, 1

in Shakespeare’s cinema of love
Purification, candles, and the Inviolata as music for churching

their exclusion by ecclesiastical authorities. 2 Early modern women’s churching ceremonies were closely associated with Candlemas, or the Feast of the Virgin Mary’s Purification, and the two shared many elements: in particular, processions with candles and, as discussed in this chapter, music. For members of the urban middle class of the early sixteenth century, both Catholic and early

in Conversions
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Gender and religious change in early modern Europe

Under the combined effects of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations within and pressure from the Ottoman Empire without, early modern Europe became a site in which an unprecedented number of people were confronted by new beliefs, and collective and individual religious identities were broken down and reconfigured. Conversions: gender and religious change in early modern Europe is the first collection to explicitly address the intersections between sexed identity and religious change in the two centuries following the Reformation. The varied and wide-ranging chapters in this collection bring the Renaissance 'turn of the soul' into productive conversation with the three most influential ‘turns’ of recent literary, historical, and art historical study: the ‘turn to religion’, the ‘material turn’, and the ‘gender turn’. Contributors consider masculine as well as feminine identity, and consider the impact of travel, printing, and the built environment alongside questions of genre, race and economics. Of interest to scholars of early modern history, literature, and architectural history, this collection will appeal to anyone interested in the vexed history of religious change, and the transformations of gendered selfhood. Bringing together leading scholars from across the disciplines of literary study, history and art history, Conversions: gender and religious change offers novel insights into the varied experiences of, and responses to, conversion across and beyond Europe. A lively Afterword by Professor Matthew Dimmock (University of Sussex) drives home the contemporary urgency of these themes, and the lasting legacies of the Reformations.

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1994 and 1999

line magically appears that is a replica of the line TITUS cut into the chest of ALARBUS , TAMORA’S ELDEST SON . The music is replaced by the sound of human breathing. Suddenly the chest of the statue is visibly breathing, rapidly, faster and faster for just five seconds and then stops. (64) In this nightmarish vision, the limbs of Alarbus are already lopped before Titus marks him to die. Earlier, as Titus had cleaned his ritual blade, Taymor had offered successive shots of Titus and Tamora

in Titus Andronicus
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godparent, appointed the Prince of Anhalt to serve as his representative; many other notables participated as well. ‘The Princess Catherine, second sister to the Elector, carried the infant, and the Prince of Anhalt, as representative of King James, occupied the first place of honour, and presented him at the font.’ 4 There Frederick Henry received his name amid much music and a sermon. He also gained a

in Shakespeare’s London 1613

of disturbing, howling music intermixed with the predatory growls of tigers’ (Smith, 111). A menacing snarl issued from the central trap in which Tamora and Aaron coupled just before Tamora emerged to confront Bassianus and Lavinia in the forest. Such visual and auditory elements led Ralf Erik Remshardt to conclude that, as in the theatre of the absurd, Purcarete’s production ‘seem[ed] to treat Shakespeare’s play mostly as a terrible and nauseating dream of which no sense [could] be made’ (264). This nightmare

in Titus Andronicus
Romeo and Juliet and romantic tragedy

(Cukor), and one from an Australian (Luhrmann). 11 As a related point, it is noteworthy that the play has always had an intimate connection with music, and this tradition also hails from the European continent rather than Britain. Peter Conrad has entertainingly traced adaptations into operas by Bellini, Keller, Delius, and Gounod, into a dramatic symphony by Berlioz, a ‘fantasy overture’ by Tchaikovsky

in Shakespeare’s cinema of love
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, ‘bitter-sweet’ ups and downs of melodrama, ‘beauty and the beast’ incongruous love, love ‘second time around’, screwball comedy of forceful individuals who bond through conflict, romantic tragedy based on ‘forbidden love’ that cannot be fulfilled in the society in which the lovers exist. Music is invariably involved in manipulating audience moods to expect which of these

in Shakespeare’s cinema of love