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Building identities in Faïza Guène’s novels

, Doria’s and her mother’s diegetic roles are not limited to embracing challenging experiences on a personal level: ‘stereotypical representations of the housing projects as sites of deviance and violence’ are humanized in the novel ‘through a tender mother–daughter relationship and communal affiliations found in female solidarity bonds, popular music, and the sharing of food’ (Mehta, 2010: 174). From sister to brother ‘J’ai vingt-quatre ans et le sentiment d’en avoir quarante’ (Guène, 2006a: 38) (‘I’m twenty-four, going on forty’) (Guène, 2008: 31), says Ahlème, the

in Reimagining North African Immigration
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Out-marching exclusion and hatred

neighborhoods, like the cité des Minguettes on the outskirts of Lyon, which saw an unprecedented upsurge in rioting and clashes between the youths and the French police. Yet the 1980s also witnessed the rise in political and civic activism in the form of graffiti, music, concerts, theatre, and increasing associative action, thereby demonstrating what philosopher Jacques Rancière (1999) defines as democratic politics. The ‘hot summers’ in the Minguettes, as the media called them, sparked new forms of civic and political engagement. Young men and women became massively involved

in Reimagining North African Immigration
New configurations of Frenchness in contemporary urban fiction

to ‘Qui fait la France?’  21 rebel against the domination of the literary establishment, ‘L’écriture comme un écho ou plutôt comme un porte-voix de cette plèbe dominée, comme une possibilité de se disputer avec ceux-là même qui vous méprisent’ (Puig, 2008: 86) (Writing as an echo or rather as a voice for the oppressed people, a way to argue with those who despise you). The beur movement came into existence thanks to the combination of a political movement aiming to improve the conditions of second-­generation immigrants and a cultural production (literature, music

in Reimagining North African Immigration
Transcending the question of origins

the film writer pays tribute to. Kechiche wants to film ‘Slimane with his family problems, personal and sexual difficulties, avoiding the archetype of the immigrant’ (Morice, 2007: 20). In this film, several characters are linked to the history of Maghrebi immigration: not only Slimane but also a group of musicians who are the protagonist’s friends. Kechiche depicts their daily lives in their tiny hotel rooms and their attempts to recreate an environment reminiscent of their country of origin, for instance through the music they perform. Here, music, like the food

in Reimagining North African Immigration

identity, closed and one-dimensional as it is, is weighing down heavily on him: his hunched posture and crestfallen look convey his personal alienation. His existential schizophrenia is further reflected in the music which accompanies the Slimane scenes, as it alternates between traditional Oriental music with the zither and music resulting from an Afro-Occidental mixing, such as funk and jazz, hybrid styles which symbolically refer to Sabrina and Dorcy as a couple. Slimane is also the only character that switches between Arabic and French, his bilingualism resulting

in Reimagining North African Immigration
Franco-Maghrebi identity in Hassan Legzouli’s film Ten’ja

.’16 The main character is not only alienated because of the linguistic barrier, he is viewed as a foreigner, an outsider, as far as Moroccan culture is concerned. Several cultural details differentiate him from the country’s nationals as well, which we will come to understand through the different encounters he makes along his journey. For instance, he learns that listening to music in the car in the presence of a dead body is culturally unacceptable. Nora explains to him that this is perceived as a sin in Morocco; she tells him that this gesture is equivalent to

in Reimagining North African Immigration

name as his killer. Identity, usually granted by (unique) naming, is not an option in this film since, regardless of his status, the other remains out of place as reflected by the double meaning of the French and Italian terms étranger and straniero, namely, ‘foreigner’ and ‘stranger.’ References Abderrezak, H. (2016). Ex-Centric Migrations: Europe and the Maghreb in Mediterranean Cinema, Literature, and Music, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. Bénayoun-Szmidt, Y. (2008). ‘Un aller sans retour: Les “Harragas ou Les barques de la Mort de Mohamed Teriah

in Reimagining North African Immigration

Fed was being understood as a local example of a more expansive set of cultural forces. Greg Wilkinson protested against the interests of a leisured class who were out of touch with the life and language of the majority. He emphasised the need for new standards and drew attention to the interconnections between popular and elite culture, noting that jazz had informed classical music and ‘primitive’ works had influenced modern sculpture.17 Osborne brushed him off in defending cultural standards.18 Officials were embroiled in Kafkaesque circular arguments. Literary

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century

a Jewish autobiography, there’d be all kinds of kosher food and there’d be klezmer music, great! … such wonderful celebrations of the life, and people had their families and grandchildren, and there was live music. That act of celebration of the book, made the book, not like a conventional book, you know, WH Smiths, God, this was blood, sweat and tears, this way, you know, ‘my life!’15 The success of these events meant they became established fixtures. If run well, they were also an opportunity to sell literally hundreds of copies and to keep the whole of the

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century

all that. But to be honest, I think the line had been broken, really. I think the people I knew in the Basement weren’t really writing as a part of a sense of tradition, they were writing influenced by much newer things, like pop music, pop lyrics, and the Mersey poets, the Liverpool poets, Roger McGough … And in a response to challenging the things they’d seen on the telly or the films … I think people create their own art out of lots of different influences from all around them, whether it’s from high art, low art or on the buses. Anything.107 In reality

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century