Richard Wragg

In 1805 Susannah Middleton travelled with her husband, Captain Robert Middleton, to Gibraltar where he was to run the naval dockyard. Abroad for the first time, Susannah maintained a regular correspondence with her sister in England. Casting light on a collection of letters yet to be fully published, the paper gives an account of Susannah‘s experiences as described to her sister. Consideration is given to Susannah‘s position as the wife of a naval officer and her own view of the role she had to play in her husband‘s success. Written at a time when an officers wife could greatly improve his hopes for advancement through the judicious use of social skills, the Middleton letters provide evidence of an often overlooked aspect of the workings of the Royal Navy.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

dated 10 March 1892 from Frances Taylor to Mother M. Lucy (Maria Forrestal). 57 CSJP: Reflections and Counsels of Mother M. Evangelista to her Spiritual Children (1963), p. 11. 124 Working identities ‘an exceptional body like the army and the navy, eminently useful to the State and the country, and necessarily governed by exceptional laws’.58 For him, women religious were an integral part of the good of the nation, even a Protestant nation. Education, social welfare and health care Education was considered the English Catholic hierarchy’s most pressing problem. A

in Contested identities
Carmen M. Mangion

Vincent de Paul and her four sisters became Ursulines. Her only brother became a Catholic priest.87 The Ryder family converted in 1846. Three of the Ryder sons became priests and one daughter became a nun.88 The Bellasis family produced three women religious (two of whom entered the Society of the Holy Child Jesus) and two priests. Convert Henrietta Kerr entered the Sacred Heart noviciate; four years later her two brothers retired early from the army and the navy to enter the Jesuit noviciate.89 Biological relationships bear further scrutiny in the context of England as

in Contested identities