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C. E. Beneš

because the city of Genoa was in some measure a Roman port. For when the Romans wished to send a navy into Africa or Spain they assembled at the port of Genoa. For this reason the same Titus Livy, in his second part 19 where he discusses the Second Punic War between the Romans and the Carthaginians, says this: in the 534th year from the founding of the City , Publius Cornelius Scipio was at Marseilles with his ships

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

whole world? When I do it in a small boat I am called a thief, but when you do the same thing with a great navy, you are called emperor. My poverty makes me a thief, but your arrogance and insatiable greed do the same’. This was as if to say: ‘You and I are both similar and dissimilar. We are similar in that I am a thief and you are a thief, but we are dissimilar in that I am a petty thief and you are a great one: I prey on the sea and you, on the entire

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

able to recruit men from the city or the Riviera to their galleys did not spare costs or expenses. Thus it is reported that there were 45,000 fighting men in this magnificent navy. But also, so many men remained in the city and along the Riviera that if it were necessary they could have nobly manned up to forty more galleys, with sufficient guards left behind in the city and along the Riviera. And indeed, because the Genoese understood that the

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
Alison K. McHardy

– and by 1377 the court of Fernando I ( r . 1367–83) was awash with faction and intrigue. As ‘patriotic’ elements in Portuguese political society cast around for allies against the Castilian threat, England (and Gaunt especially) was glad to make an agreement which promised access to the second-best navy in Europe, and offered support in his contest for the Castilian throne [79] . Thus by the mid-1370s

in The reign of Richard II
Alison K. McHardy

force and embarked with his army, having made an alliance with João, king of Portugal (r. 1385–1433). This illegitimate son of King Pedro (r. 1357–67) succeeded his legitimate half-brother Fernando (r. 1367–83), but faced both internal and Castilian challenges. He was desperate for allies, hence his overtures to England. For England, the support of the Portuguese navy was worth having, and Portugal

in The reign of Richard II
Chris Given-Wilson

out; it would be much better to take your time and send first for the whole of the navy; for we have less than a hundred barges; how can we go, seeing that around here there are many huge rocks in the water, and the seabed is dangerous? Take my advice: it would be much better to send the earl of Salisbury across, who can hold the field against the duke and make sufficient war

in Chronicles of the Revolution, 1397–1400