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Catholic women religious in nineteenth-century England and Wales

Roman Catholic women's congregations are an enigma of nineteenth century social history. Over 10,000 women, establishing and managing significant Catholic educational, health care and social welfare institutions in England and Wales, have virtually disappeared from history. In nineteenth-century England, representations of women religious were ambiguous and contested from both within and without the convent. This book places women religious in the centre of nineteenth-century social history and reveals how religious activism shaped the identity of Catholic women religious. It is devoted to evolution of religious life and the early monastic life of the women. Catholic women were not pushed into becoming women religious. On the basis of their available options, they chose a path that best suited their personal, spiritual, economic and vocational needs. The postulancy and novitiate period formed a rite of passage that tested the vocation of each aspirant. The book explores the religious activism of women religious through their missionary identity and professional identity. The labour of these women was linked to their role as evangelisers. The book deals with the development of a congregation's corporate identity which brought together a disparate group of women under the banner of religious life. It looks specifically at class and ethnicity and the women who entered religious life, and identifies the source of authority for the congregation and the individual sister.

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impediments. Typically, the impediments were scrupulously used to screen postulants, but exceptions were made in certain circumstances. Forming a novice 91 especially if the candidate was not known to the congregation.10 The final step, an interview with the local superior or novice mistress, was critical; she determined whether the candidate might have the requisite attributes for religious life and allowed her to enter the congregation as a postulant or dismissed her as having ‘no vocation’. Once the candidate was past these hurdles, the real testing began. The

in Contested identities

edited volume The Education of the Novice , a collection of lectures given to fifty novice mistresses in 1955, began by remarking that novitiates posed different problems from those of fifty years earlier. He noted that ‘revolutionary changes’ in society required novice mistresses to become a ‘bridge’ between the life of the secular world and the life of the cloister. Her role was to ‘inculcate firmly the essentials of religious life while interpreting the particular customs and regulations of the convent to the mentality of the newcomers’. He referenced Modern Girls

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age

say goodbye to them and I remember being taken to a door … the Novice Mistress said ‘You are now going into enclosure.’ Well. So I raised my body, straightened my back and thought ‘This is it’ … and in I went but I can’t remember feeling happy, not even sad, I wasn’t homesick or anything um because you know this, I was coming home, home. 23 But, of course, the ministries of teaching, nursing and parish work usually required sisters to leave their convent spaces. When outside the convent, enclosure was consciously performed in embodied ways: through distance and

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age

constructed hierarchy of women managing women. Most pontifical-rite congregations developed highly centralised hierarchical structures and systems of administration. The mother superior and her council, which usually consisted of at least one mother assistant, a bursar and a novice mistress, were responsible for managing the internal affairs of the congregation and the novitiate. They directed the purchasing, building and maintenance of physical structures including their convent and the institutions under their care. They supervised the staff of various institutions and

in Contested identities

religious. Women who entered religious life in the 1940s had some awareness that being a ‘nun’, as discussed in Chapter 1 , included ‘dying to the world’ and the sacrifice of familial and friendship relationships. The formation period, the postulancy and the novitiate, trained women to interact in convent spaces. Like other forms of professional training at the time, it was rigorous, structured and rooted in social-class-based ideals of deference that were an everyday part of private and public life. 28 Tutored and guided by a novice mistress, the formation process

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age

reunite with others from their congregation: novice mistresses, fellow classmates from the novitiate and former work colleagues. This was the time and place to revitalise their physical and spiritual energy and renew old friendships. The convent was another important geographic space; it was the smaller unit of congregation life and, for the majority of women religious, the location of their daily lives. The convent was where they lived, worked, prayed and recuperated from their labours alongside other women with similar beliefs and aspirations. These daily

in Contested identities
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religious life were leading to the ‘emancipation’ of women religious. But did she consider that a good thing? Speaking to novice mistresses on a training day in the early 1960s, she underscored the difficulties that women religious faced, inside and outside the convent and in the ‘critical eyes of the world’. Disparaging female religious who were ignorant of world problems, she instead expected them to be aware of the major ‘crisis of their times’: atomic weapons, strike mentality, ‘atheistic communism’ and the break-up of family life. At the same time she regretted the

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age

feature of religious life. Born after the war, she benefited from a post-Butler education: she was educated at a Catholic secondary modern, then attended a further education college and enrolled in a nursing course. Yet, she was being taught in the mid-1960s novitiate about a blind obedience that meant being treated as a child even to the point of having to ask to take a bath. Nuns and sisters were being introduced to new thinking on obedience. Even before the Second Vatican Council, Dominican Henry St John, speaking at a training workshop for novice mistresses at

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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) and Sisters M. Bernard (Maria Kelly) and M. Gertrude (Mary Ledwith), along with Mary McHale (who later became Sister M. Juliana), passed their teaching examinations in 1849. She proudly announced that ‘these were the first Catholic certificated Mistresses in England’.42 In 1855, the annals of the Birmingham Sisters of Mercy noted that ‘Rev Mother Sr. M. Catherine and Sr. M. Camillus went to Nottingham for the purpose of obtaining government certificates for teaching’.43 Annals of the Derby Sisters of Mercy noted that three sisters were sent to Our Lady’s Teacher

in Contested identities