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Being Irish in nineteenth-century Scotland and Canada

by grooming Scottish women for positions of authority within the convents and these included superior, assistant superior and/or novice mistress. If possible Irish women were blocked from these positions, whereas some were discouraged from even applying for entry to a community or, if they did get in, were blackballed from progressing beyond the stage of postulant or novice. While there is no doubt that some had no vocation and instead looked to convent life as a means of achieving security, particularly in old age, others were rejected because they were Irish. Non

in Women and Irish diaspora identities