Search results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
  • Manchester Gothic x
Clear All
Jim Cheshire

ecclesiological politics. This is the gap in which Toms was able to build a successful glass-painting business. The discovery of the John Toms archive In 1983, a brick kiln was discovered in the top floor of 2 High Street Wellington. 3 Hidden in the debris inside the kiln were various documents relating to John Toms, who ran his glass-painting business from the premises. An estimates book covering the period 1852–66 was found in

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Jim Cheshire

legitimise key rites of passage such as baptism for both Anglicans and Nonconformists. The Civil Registration Act of 1837 meant that births could be legally registered with the state; this signalled an end to the Church of England’s monopoly. 8 Another waning site of church power was the parish vestry. The vestry was once a surprisingly diverse and accessible site of political action but gradually became narrower in both its

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Jim Cheshire

the righteous man’s reward. 23 There is a curious link here between the politics of class and the production of aesthetic credibility. Once the artist was above suspicion, so was the art. The true artist had to be above suspicion in both financial and religious terms. Established architects often managed to achieve a degree of religious credibility that nullified

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Jim Cheshire

example of painterly stained glass closely aligned with eighteenth-century gothic: the Magna Carta episode was a favourite of those inspired by gothic political history, and depictions of it seem to have made quite regular appearances in eighteenth-century gothic interiors. 14 So painterly glass was not completely rejected by eighteenth-century gothic, but its appeal was not widespread. Even if painterly stained glass had appealed to more gothic

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Jim Cheshire

show trial over theological definitions of the ‘real presence’ in the eucharist in the early 1850s. Denison can hardly have been more active in terms of church politics and was publicly aligned with the Tractarians, but was never a member of the CCS. He used Bell extensively: three commissions between 1849 and 1852 total £165. There is little doubt that Denison was interested in ecclesiology and probably stained glass in

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
How and why the market spread
Jim Cheshire

reference to a contemporary Ritualist conflict about which way the priest faced while celebrating the eucharist. This type of humour relied on quite a sophisticated understanding of religious politics; otherwise Leech’s popularity is difficult to explain. His tone is often humorous but rarely mocking. He admired faith, integrity and some innovation but characterised much ecclesiological and Ritualist activity as faddish: ‘There was no

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival