Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items for :

  • Manchester Literature Studies x
Clear All
Abstract only

on the hustings to address a peaceful crowd on a hot summer’s day.2 These twenty minutes resulted in one of the most significant events in modern British history, in which an estimated 18 people were killed and more than 650 injured by the combined efforts of the Manchester and Salford Yeomanry Cavalry (MYC) and the Fifteenth Hussars.3 Samuel Bamford’s harrowing eyewitness account of what he saw that day remains a powerful testimony to the sanctioned brutality of a repressive regime intent on destroying those who sought greater political freedom. The crowd was

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo

Scriblerian Club in the Augustan Period,3 Romantic writers, such as Byron, Shelley, Coleridge and, of course, Austen, all employed satire to mock existing social and political norms, with the result that hundreds of satires were written and published during this era.4 Interestingly, David Fairer considers whether satire ‘thrives at a time when a system of values is under threat and new forces are challenging an old cultural hegemony’.5 Even though Fairer cites 1829 as supporting evidence for his claim, 1819 exemplifies a time in which there was a very real challenge to

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo

‘Ye English warriors’ 65 2 j ‘Ye English warriors’: radical nationalism and the true patriot Radicalism and nationalism would appear to be unlikely bedfellows, given that they tend to be placed on opposite ends of the political spectrum; yet this chapter demonstrates how many of the radical poems and songs written after Peterloo are underpinned by a radical English nationalism, with poets making a clear distinction between the un-English characteristics of a tyrannical state and monarchy and the true English patriot fighting for lost freedoms. Although the

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo

40 Ballads and songs of Peterloo 1 j ‘Rise Britons, rise now from your slumber’: the revolutionary call to arms Rise like lions after slumber In unvanquishable number – Shake your chains to earth like dew Which in sleep had fallen on you – Ye are many – they are few.1 Shelley’s famous refrain in The Masque of Anarchy, written furiously and frantically in the ten days following his receipt of news from Manchester, is undoubtedly the most famous piece of poetry associated with Peterloo. Described by Robert Poole as ‘perhaps the most powerful of all political

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo

working women at Peterloo ‘represents the earliest expression of organised female activity in British politics’.6 Labouring-class women had been involved in MORGAN 9781784993122 PRINT.indd 94 23/04/2018 15:53 ‘Base brat of reform’ 95 radical politics since the end of the Napoleonic Wars and were often present at rallies and demonstrations across the north, as well as joining friendly societies and taking part in strikes. Driven by hunger and poverty, women turned to radical politics, establishing female reform societies during 1819 in northern towns such as

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo

. The centrality of liberty to the discourse surrounding the French Revolution is evident in the poems and songs of this period. ‘An Ode Addressed to the Friends of liberty’, published in Politics for the People in 1794, can be regarded as a companion piece to Collins’ ode both through the use of genre and understanding of the role liberty played in the nation’s history. It begins: Liberty once was England’s boast, But now, alas! That treasure’s lost, And all our boats are vain. Therefore let us with zeal unite To claim the just, the long lost right, And Liberty

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Abstract only

. With the exception of the stoppages, the central stage is the focus of this work. The revolution in women’s journeying ran parallel with dramatic changes in their status in Britain, as they fought to achieve equal political, educational, professional and material status with men. Leading figures such as Virginia Woolf, Vera Brittain and Winifred Holtby argued that women needed financial independence, improved employment and domestic parity with men.6 Women slowly entered universities’ hallowed halls. The Women’s Social and Political Union and the National Union of

in Women, travel and identity

Reverend Gilbert Wakefield, a radical writer who died shortly after being released from Dorchester Gaol where he had been sent following conviction for publishing A Reply to some Parts of the Bishop of Landaff’s Address.22 However, unlike these examples, the elegies in this chapter do not name their subjects, either through a desire not to single out an individual when there were so many victims or a wariness of naming names in a repressive political climate. Subjects range from the individual ‘Patriot’ or ‘victim’ to the collective ‘Reformers’ and ‘Unfortunate Persons

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Making the journey abroad

inexperienced women for domestic service.103 Women of modernity Technological innovations such as the ocean liner coincided with a contemporary sense that this was a new and distinctly ‘modern’ age.104 The steamship became a ‘signifier of modernity’ that ‘both contained and disseminated economic power, political ambition, ideas, and symbolic meanings’.105 Defining modernity has proved contentious. Some propose that modernity fundamentally relates to power, ‘the capacity to change the structure of systems’: a society can be defined as ‘modern’ when its power-complex is

in Women, travel and identity
Abstract only
Romantic opportunity and sexual hazard?

P. Horn, Ladies of the Manor: Wives and Daughters in Country-House Society, 1830  –1918 (Stroud, 1991), p. 54. 97 P. Jalland, Women, Marriage and Politics 1860  –1914 (Oxford, 1986), p. 24. 98 P. Horn, Women in the 1920s (Stroud, 1995), pp. 27–  8. 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 j 167 J women, travel and identity 99 E. Roberts, A Woman’s Place: An Oral History of Working-Class Women 1890  –1940 (Oxford, 1984), p. 71. 100 Ibid., pp. 70  –1. 101 Ibid., p. 73. 102 ILN, 8 January 1870. 103 Chilton, Agents of Empire, pp. 56  –7

in Women, travel and identity