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This book is a study of the English Reformation as a poetic and political event. It examines the political, religious and poetic writings of the period 1520-1580, in relation to the effects of confessionalization on Tudor writing. The central argument of the book is that it is a mistake to understand this literature simply on the basis of the conflict between Protestantism and Catholicism. Instead one needs to see Tudor culture as fractured between emerging confessional identities, Protestant and Catholic, and marked by a conflict between those who embraced the process of confessionalization and those who rejected it. Sir Richard Morrison's A Remedy for Sedition was part of the Henrician government's propaganda response to the Pilgrimage of Grace. Edwardian politicians and intellectuals theorized and lauded the idea of counsel in both practice and theory. The book discusses three themes reflected in Gardiner's 1554 sermon: the self, the social effects of Reformation, and the Marian approaches to the interpretation of texts. The Marian Reformation produced its own cultural poetics - which continued to have an influence on Tudor literature long after 1558. The decade following the successful suppression of the Northern Rebellion in 1570 was a difficult one for the Elizabethan regime and its supporters. An overview of Elizabethan poetics and politics explains the extent to which the culture of the period was a product of the political and poetic debates of the early years of the Queen's reign.

Chapter 4 . Elizabethan poetics and politics The Perills are many, great and imminent. Great in respect of the Persons and Matters. Persons The Quenes Majesty herself as Pacient. The Pope, the King of France, and Spayne as Authors and Workers; and their Associates. The Quene of Scotts as Instrument, wherby the Matters shall be attempted ageynst the Quenes Majesty. Matters For the recovery of the Tirany to the Pope, which of late Years hath bene discovered and so weakened, as, if the gret Monarchies wer not his Mayntenors, and intended his Recovery, the same

in Literature and politics in the English Reformation

Chapter 2 . Edwardian politics and poetics My counsailo[u]rs with suche other necessarie p[e]rsons [that] attend vppon me that daie [St Stephens?] must also be consydered / There maie be no fewer then sixe counsailo[u]rs at the least / I must also have a divine a philosopher an astronom[e]r a poet a phisician / a potecarie / a Mr of request[es] / a sivilian / a disard / two gentlemen ushers besides Juglers / tomblers / fooles / friers and suche other … (Letter from the lord of misrule [George Ferrers] regarding arrangements for the Christmas entertainments of

in Literature and politics in the English Reformation
The Henrician Reformation

Chapter 1 . Pilgrims, poets and politics: the Henrician Reformation Could we, if we knew what we did, go against King Henry VIII, of whom I will say nothing but this: that His Grace’s fame and praise cannot fall but when all good letters fall, which cannot be before men leave the earth and the earth men. (A Remedy for Sedition, Sir Richard Morrison, 1536)1 S ir Richard Morrison’s A Remedy for Sedition was part of the Henrician government’s propaganda response to the Pilgrimage of Grace. It is a sophisticated work with many classical and biblical references

in Literature and politics in the English Reformation
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5 Home Rule politics Regicide Logue was a nationalist. He retained a fundamental conviction that the Irish had the right to govern themselves and only self-government could effectively redress Catholic grievances. He supported and participated in the clerical-nationalist alliance forged by William Walsh in the 1880s. Although deeply concerned over the methodology of the National League, he offered nothing but support to the campaign in public. His disapproval of clerical participation in the Plan did not prevent his show of solidarity with Father James McFadden

in Michael Logue and the Catholic Church in Ireland, 1879–1925
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2 Land and politics The Land War The upsurge in political violence after 1879 posed a series of complex problems for the Catholic Church in Ireland. The nature of violence, its scope and scale, and its origin all presented challenges which were in many ways new. The violent protest associated with the land question after 1879 heralded, or was symptomatic of, sweeping political change. Previously, it was quite often simply a matter of condemnation for the Church. Insurrection, such as the Fenian revolt, could be dismissed as the work of a small group of

in Michael Logue and the Catholic Church in Ireland, 1879–1925
James I’s Daemonologie and The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches

opened each Assize with the ‘charge’, augmented with their own opinions. In Cockburn’s view, Jacobean charges ‘often degenerated into a vehicle for prejudice and intimidation’, and exposed political tensions between court and country. 8 As sophisticated London courtiers, Altham and Bromley would have shared the common metropolitan view of north Lancashire as a region mired in stubborn popery, attempted witchery, superstitious credulity and other heterodoxies. Since James now insisted upon religious conformity, their Lancaster charge could safely have included some

in The Lancashire witches
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Elizabethan political and poetic culture. 1579 saw the publication of Edmund Spenser’s Shepheardes Calender which built on the work of early English Protestant writers. In particular, Spenser combined in his volume Barnabe Googe’s image of a band of godly shepherds with a celebration of Elizabeth’s queenship. In The Shepheardes Calender Cupido becomes Cynthia, a fit object for the song of godly shepherds if not a full member of their bond. In 1583 William Cecil’s The Execution of Justice in England and Sir Thomas Smith’s De Republica Anglorum were published. These works can

in Literature and politics in the English Reformation
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Introduction Introduction . T his book is a study of the English Reformation as a poetic and political event. It examines the writing of the period 1520–80, political, religious and poetic, in relation to the effects of confessionalization on Tudor writing. The central argument of the book is that it is a mistake to understand this literature simply on the basis of the conflict between Protestantism and Catholicism. Instead one needs to see Tudor culture as fractured between emerging confessional identities, Protestant and Catholic, and marked by a conflict

in Literature and politics in the English Reformation

15 Monte Cassino and Carolingian politics around 800 Sven Meeder Perhaps one of the earliest witnesses to a fundamental difference in Italian and French couture is a late-eighth-century letter from Monte Cassino. Its sharp observation of fashion differences is arguably still an accurate representation of the variation in dress on either side of the Alps: ‘the Gallic monks dress in more wide and more generous clothes, whereas the Italian monks, like ours, have shorter and tighter garments’.1 The text in question is not principally concerned with the apparently

in Religious Franks