Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 49 items for :

  • Manchester Film Studies x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
Clear All
Abstract only
Author: Brigitte Rollet

Coline Serreau is one of the most famous female French directors alive, not only in France but also abroad. This book is devoted not only to some relevant biographical aspects of Serreau's personal and artistic life, but also to the social, historical and political context of her debut. It deals with the 1970s' flavour of Serreau's work and more especially with the importance of politics. Taking intertextuality in its broadest sense, it assesses the strong literary influence on the tone, genre and content of Serreau's films and dramas. The book is concerned with the cinematographic genres Serreau uses. It provides a description and an analysis of Serreau's comedies, within the wider perspective of French comedies. The book also deals with the element of 'family' or community which is recurrent in Serreau's films and plays. During the 1980s, Serreau's career moved towards fiction, and she worked both for the cinema and the theatre. Serreau often underlines her family's lack of financial resources. The book considers the specificity of French cinema in the 1970s before analysing in more detail Serreau's first film. Serreau's work on stage and on big or small screens was strongly influenced by the political mood which succeeded May '68 in France. The book also discusses the idea of utopia which was the original theme of Serreau' first documentary and which is central to her first fiction film, Pourquoi pas!. Female humour and laughter cannot be considered without another powerful element: the motivation of often transgressive laughter.

The issue of ethnicity in France, and how ethnicities are represented there visually, remains one of the most important and polemical aspects of French post-colonial politics and society. This is the first book to analyse how a range of different ethnicities have been represented across contemporary French visual culture. Via a wide series of case studies – from the worldwide hit film Amélie to France’s popular TV series Plus belle la vie – it probes how ethnicities have been represented across different media, including film, photography, television and the visual arts. Four chapters examine distinct areas of particular importance: national identity, people of Algerian heritage, Jewishness and France’s second city Marseille.

Abstract only
Brigitte Rollet

1970s, hers is in many ways unique, and it could be said that throughout her career she has skilfully mixed tradition and innovation, in topics as well as in very personal rewriting of existing narrative forms. The first chapter of this book is devoted not only to some relevant biographical aspects of Coline Serreau’s personal and artistic life, but also to the social, historical and political context of her debut. Since the beginning, she has seemed to follow different trends and traditions which are central to both French cinema

in Coline Serreau
Abstract only
Coline Serreau and politics (1972–96)
Brigitte Rollet

Coline Serreau’s work on stage and on big or small screens was (and still is) strongly influenced by the political mood which succeeded May ’68 in France. Her debut was clearly motivated by the sense of deep changes French women felt at the time. Although she did not actually join any of the various women’s groups and movements, the films she made in the 1970s reflect most of their concerns. From the 1970s onwards, she has remained faithful to her initial beliefs, even if the changes within French society in the past

in Coline Serreau
Engaging with ethnicity
Joseph McGonagle

1 Changing notions of national identity: engaging with ethnicity As the Introduction made clear, since the early 1980s France has experienced an important period of significant political and social change. Many prevailing notions of national identity were redefined as the descendants of post-World War Two migrants to France (and especially those of Maghrebi heritage) came of age. Laws on nationality and citizenship were repeatedly revised, and controversy raged over measures that purportedly challenged the primacy of French republican universalism as well as

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture
Jane Roscoe and Craig Hight

Like degree 1 mock-documentaries, examples of the form which we categorise as degree 2 explicitly highlight their own fictionality, but generally do so in order to ask their audience to reflect upon the validity of the cultural or political position of their subjects. These texts tend to be characterised by an ‘ambivalent’ appropriation of documentary codes and conventions: appropriating documentary

in Faking it
Brigitte Rollet

–1973), a stage director considered by some as one of the most important of the 1950s, whose works include inter alia stage adaptations of Samuel Beckett, Jean Genet, Aimé Césaire and Eugène Ionesco. Both her parents had been resisters during the Second World War and were left-wing political activists. Her mother was among the 121 writers and artists who in 1960 signed the ‘déclaration sur le droit à l’insoumission en Algérie’, 1 which defended the right of soldiers to refuse to do their military service in Algeria. In 1952

in Coline Serreau
From bad taste to gross-out
John Mundy and Glyn White

Comedy raises issues around the politics of representation, about power, control and freedom of speech because, as Sharon Lockyer and Michael Pickering state: ‘Humour is only possible because certain boundaries, rules and taboos exist in the first place’ (2009: 16). The issues raised are often articulated through discussions about taste. Taste in this sense is about judgements

in Laughing matters
Jane Roscoe and Craig Hight

-structuralist approaches to audience research typically construct a comprehensive understanding of the significance of a variety of social, political and historical contexts for audience readings of a text. The reading which any viewer makes of a programme or film is ‘unstable’ in the sense that meaning is never fixed but is constantly being reconstructed, (Dahlgren, 1992 ). Any text still has a degree of determination in the ‘fixing’ of its

in Faking it
Abstract only
Joseph McGonagle

ethnicities are undisclosed, however, this humanist approach risks homogenising differences tout court among his cosmopolitan cohort. In this way, Delahaye’s project exemplifies the dominant political philosophy in France – French republican universalism – that legally asserts equality among French citizens and, despite patent societal inequalities, historically has refused to distinguish between them. This, combined with several other factors, ensures that the study of how ethnicity is represented in 2 ­ Representing ethnicity France,  especially visually,  remains

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture