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Jeffrey Richards

). But he wrecks the broadcasting studio and escapes. He then concocts and carries out a plan to kidnap Tokyo Rose and thus terminate her broadcasts. Radio and politics became inextricably mixed in the United States in the 1930s. Franklin Delano Roosevelt became par excellence the ‘radio president’ making over 300 radio addresses between 1933 and 1945. His addresses became popularly known as ‘fireside chats’ and created that vital ‘illusion of intimacy’; they were

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60

The importance of films in the cultural and social life of both Britain and the United States has long been recognized. Although radio survived in Britain more or less intact, by 1960 it too had taken second place to television as the prime domestic medium. This book begins by analysing the very different relationships between cinema and radio that emerged in Britain and the United States. It moves on to examine the ways in which cinema adapted radio programmes in the fields of comedy and detective fiction and then how radio dramatized films. When radio first took off in the United States in the late 1920s, it was regarded by the film industry as a rival, something to keep people at home and away from the cinema. But during the 1930s, Hollywood began to appreciate the value of radio in publicizing and promoting its films. The British broadcasting service was set up in 1922 with a monopoly and finance from a licence fee following negotiations between the Post Office, which controlled the air waves, and the radio industry, which manufactured the equipment. Radio in wartime was informational and inspirational. It provided news, entertainment, and propaganda. The book concludes with a look in detail at the ways in which the two media have dealt with three popular fictional characters, the Scarlet Pimpernel, Tarzan and Sherlock Holmes.

Abstract only
Stuart Hanson

, and not-quite-so anonymous flâneurs. 1 Nevertheless, this study is not, it is hoped, just about technology or just about cinemas. Such a story would be over-deterministic. On the contrary it seeks to place the development of cinema in a broad social, economic, cultural and political context. For as Belton observes: ‘[t]he identity of the cinema as an institution remains bound

in From silent screen to multi-screen
Stuart Hanson

cinemas, initially on the edges and latterly in the centre of Britain’s towns and cities, was the result of changes in economic, political and cultural policies precipitated by both the apparent triumph of laissez-faire capitalism and the hegemony of the Hollywood film. Moreover, the design of the multiplex and its place within a shifting consumer landscape saw the development of larger and grander buildings often located close

in From silent screen to multi-screen
Jeffrey Richards

There was also strict censorship, with sex, politics, race, religion, profanity and bodily functions all banned. When Mae West and Don Ameche performed an Adam and Eve sketch on The Edgar Bergen Show in 1937, there was an outcry. The Catholic Church threatened a boycott of Chase and Sanborn Coffee, the programme’s sponsor, and there was a formal investigation by the Federal Communications Commission. As a result Mae West was off the air for the next 37 years

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Stuart Hanson

was in many ways a political move intended to pacify middle-class pressure groups, local authorities and central government which, it was feared in the case of the latter, would impose state censorship. Much of the agitation for greater censorship and regulation of the cinema came from a plethora of moral and religious pressure groups, drawing their constituents largely from amongst the middle and upper classes, such as the

in From silent screen to multi-screen
The creative tension
Jeffrey Richards

themes in Victorian thought: the desire to raise the general cultural level of the population, to incorporate the newly enfranchised working classes into the existing social and political order, and to educate the population for participation in mass democracy, something that was only fully established in the United Kingdom after the First World War, when women finally got the vote. Radio was uniquely placed in the inter-war years to undertake the implementation

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Abstract only
Jeffrey Richards

Police, Reap the Wild Wind, The Story of Dr Wassell and Samson and Delilah . But perhaps the director whose work was most in tune with the kind of family values Lux wanted to promote was Frank Capra. Between 1934 and 1951 when he temporarily ceased directing, every one of his films was adapted for the radio except for his black comedy Arsenic and Old Lace and his three political films ( Mr Smith Goes to Washington, Meet John Doe and State of the Union

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Richard Farmer

The CEA and the government terms, as a source of revenue. The Ministry of Labour, meanwhile, eyed it – or more accurately the seventy-five thousand staff it employed – as a source of productive manpower.15 Yet both the Treasury and the Ministry of Labour were also aware of the political implications of treating the exhibition industry too harshly. A balance therefore needed to be struck between what British cinemas might be expected to do for the government, and their ongoing duty to their patrons. Striking this balance was not always easy, however. As the

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45
Stuart Hanson

influence over much of Britain’s foreign and domestic policy. It was clear that the USA would demand strict conditions for the continuance of financial assistance after the war. The two powers trod the delicate terrain of post-war Europe, the general perception being that Britain was the junior partner. It was in this political climate that many expressions of anti-Americanism found their way into popular discourse, particularly

in From silent screen to multi-screen