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This book explores representations of queer migrant Muslims in international literature and film from the 1980s to the present. It brings together a variety of contemporary writers and filmmakers of Muslim heritage engaged in vindicating same-sex desire from several Western locations. The book approaches queer Muslims as figures forced to negotiate their identities according to the expectations of the West and of their migrant Muslim communities. It coins the concept of queer micropolitical disorientation via the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Sara Ahmed and Gayatri Gopinath. The author argues that depictions of queer Muslims in the West disorganise the social categories that make up contemporary Western societies. The study covers three main themes: queer desire across racial and national borders; Islamic femininities and masculinities; and the queer Muslim self in time and place. These thematic clusters examine the nuances of artistic depictions of queer Muslims’ mundane challenges to Western Islamophobia and Islamicate heteronormativity. Written in a scholarly but accessible style, this is a timely contribution to the controversial topic of Islam and homosexuality, forging understanding about the dissident position of Muslims who contravene heteronormative values and their equivocal political position in the West.

The portrayal of tattoos in Sarah Hall’s The electric Michelangelo and Alan Kent’s Voodoo pilchard
Hywel Dix

INTRODUCTION In an important early study of crime fiction, Dennis Porter suggested that a significant split took place during the nineteenth century between novels that had both a social orientation and a political commitment, and those which were more inward looking, concerned with aesthetic style and sensibility rather than with using fiction as a form of social criticism. 1 By the end of the nineteenth century, the aesthetic crime novel had become dominant over the crime novel of social commitment, so that

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
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Queering Islam and micropolitical disorientation
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

not fully physically just yet, at least discursively. What can be gleaned from Iran’s unrelenting official position regarding homosexuality is that sexual non-normativity has become for many Muslim countries and communities an issue of political strategy: it helps them situate themselves in complete opposition to the alleged moral laxity of the aggressively modern but also highly simplified West. To the chagrin of contemporary Islamists keen to deny the existence of homosexuality in Muslim-majority contexts, it is undeniable that Muslim

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Queer phenomenology, and cultural and religious commodifi cation in Hanif Kureishi’s My Beautiful Laundrette (1985) and The Buddha of Suburbia (1990)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

film directed by the British director Stephen Frears. The film’s international box-office success took its own makers by surprise. Set in economically challenged and racially restless London during the peak of the Thatcher era, with a young British Asian man as its main protagonist, the film came out only a few years before the publication of Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses and all its attendant controversies. These polemical events, now commonly known as the ‘Rushdie Affair’, have constituted the foundational moment of British Muslim identity as a political

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
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Tattoos, transgenics, and tech-noir in Dark angel
Will Slocombe

relation to Emily E. Auger’s filmic concept of tech-noir. Named after the nightclub in James Cameron’s 1984 film, Terminator , tech-noir functions by way of a development and conflation of the gothic, detective and film noir , and sf genres; a response to the ways in which technologies are seen to frame experience. The series, as it develops into its second season, shifts across various genres and emphasises the corruption of systems – whether environmental, technological or socio-political. This means that the world itself is re-configured as criminal and corrupt, and

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
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A queer and cartographic exploration of the Palestinian diaspora in Randa Jarrar’s A Map of Home (2008) and Him, Me, Muhammad Ali (2016)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

prominence in Jarrar’s imaginary, although having grown up in the diaspora, she also has a complicated history of political reclamation of the lost homeland and a desire for a more durable home at a remove from the demands of Palestinian nationalism. Jarrar observes in a short memoir entitled ‘Imagining Myself in Palestine’: ‘ Growing up, my Palestinian identity was mostly tied to my father. He was the Palestinian in the family, and when we went back to the West Bank it was to see his brothers and sisters and parents’ (2012, n.p.). Jarrar’s last successful trip to

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Interstitial queerness and the Ismaili diaspora in Ian Iqbal Rashid’s poetry and films
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

affiliation, the collision between the personal and the political, as well as issues of belonging and racial difference, are all a constant in Rashid’s oeuvre, including his films, which embody, in their colourful complexity, the dilemmas of living in the diaspora as a queer citizen of Ismaili heritage. Rashid’s transcontinental familial and personal journeys demonstrates just how queer diasporas can be, featuring collective and individual migrations from India to East Africa, then Canada, and finally to Britain, where Rashid relocated in the early

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Queering ethnicity and British Muslim masculinities in Sally El Hosaini’s My Brother the Devil (2012)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

grew up in Cairo and attended a United World College in South Wales from the age of sixteen. El Hosaini ascribes her empathy with people of various ethnic, national, and class backgrounds to her college’s ability to ‘foster intercultural understanding’ (Hoggard, 2013 ). She went on to study Arabic and Middle Eastern Politics at Durham University. It was at this time that she realised she should have studied film. After graduating, she became an apprentice in the UK Arts International foundation, and then was involved in the production of Middle Eastern war

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Unveiling American Muslim women in Rolla Selbak’s Three Veils (2011)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

of the violence Islam has inflicted upon women’ ( 2005 , p. 195). For many feminists and non-feminists alike, the veil’s sole ideological purpose is the subjugation of Muslim women. However, what such simplistic understanding of the veil’s purpose effectively obscures is the political, cultural, and religious complexities surrounding the wearing of the headscarf, especially when the garment is voluntarily taken up, and most particularly so in the West. As Megan MacDonald asserts, ‘the veil always already works beyond the simple binary in

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Matrilinearity, Sufism, and l’errance in the autofictional works of Abdellah Taïa
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

France, at that – cannot be construed as anything but political: In general, using ‘I’ for third generation [postcolonial] male and female authors, gay or straight, is equivalent to ‘un acte politique.’ As Abdellah Taïa stipulates: ‘Il me semble que dire “je” dans ce pays est un acte politique. Nous sommes les enfants d’une période où l’oppression était omniprésente et le silence forcé. À un moment donné, il fallait que ça se libère’. (Orlando, 2009 , p. 111) (It seems to me that

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film