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of the violence included state forces such as the Presidential Guard, political militia groups such as the Interahamwe, and Hutu civilians. There was already a United Nations presence in Rwanda in April 1994, but that month the UN decided to reduce its forces from 2,500 to 270 following the killing of 10 Belgian troops. In May, as the violence continued, the UN Security Council agreed a larger

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
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Post-Cold War conflicts and the media

. Huntington argued that the post-Cold War world was riven by a ‘clash of civilisations’: the motor of conflict was not political ideology but deep-seated ethnic antagonism. Hence, for example, one of the civilisational ‘fault lines’ which, he argued, divided the world ran ‘almost exactly along the line now separating Croatia and Slovenia from the rest of Yugoslavia’ (Huntington 1993 : 30). Huntington

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
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). What gave rise to these vicissitudes was both a degree of genuine uncertainty and indecision, and an element of political calculation. Bush reportedly backtracked on early statements that removing the Taliban was an objective of the war because Pakistan, formerly the main supporter of the Taliban but now America’s key regional ally in the ‘war on terror’, was alarmed at the prospect that Afghanistan

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
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, it has to be clear that the Serbs were responsible’ for the failure of the talks (quoted in Judah 2000: 212). Initially, however, the ethnic-Albanians refused to sign, since the plan did not offer full independence for Kosovo, whereas the Yugoslav side accepted the political agreement, although arguing that it should be implemented by UN rather than Nato troops. This presented a conundrum for the

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
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– attracted so much foreign aid that it soon accounted for two-thirds of the Somali economy (Maren 1997 ). The dependency thereby created on foreign food imports undermined the domestic economy, and encouraged political corruption and intensified traditional clan divisions in Somalia, as Barre used aid to favour his allies and weaken his enemies. The Reagan and Bush administrations supported Barre

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
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as simplifications which impeded understanding. Instead, she presents the break-up of Yugoslavia as a process involving complex interactions between internal and external factors, resulting in the rise of destructive nationalist politics on all sides. For the purposes of our discussion, the most important alternative view is that which sees outside interference as the key cause of war. Analysts such as

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
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-war sentiment in domestic politics, at the same time there seemed to be considerable agreement on the need for the international community to deal in some way with the problem presented by Saddam’s regime and its alleged WMD. The position of European governments opposed to war was not, of course, that war was wrong in principle, but that UN weapons inspectors should be allowed to complete their work and that action

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
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Framing post-Cold War conflicts

US, and, on the other, editorial commentaries which chorused approval of the tremendous moral mission supposedly being undertaken by the West. In general, the media were neither ignorant of the reality of the crises they covered nor entirely uncritical of the policy justifications offered by Western governments. Rather, journalists and political leaders were engaged in a common project of both

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts