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An interview with David Byrne

Graham Spencer: Can you tell me what you did during the Good Friday Agreement period? David Byrne: I was Attorney-General in the Irish Government, so my role was on the legal side but, of course, the role of the Attorney-General is to link the legal to the political. The important contribution that I think was expected of me was in relation

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
An interview with Liz O’Donnell

years. I had learned politics quite quickly on my feet, having previously been a city councillor in Dublin since 1991. I studied law in Trinity College and worked in a large firm of solicitors before going into politics. I was married with a very young family. How did being a lawyer impact on your skills as a negotiator and drafting text? I do believe that the Good Friday

in Inside Accounts, Volume II

environmental level, conducive to such radicalisation. Yet, as an abstract, diagrammatic reading of this power will make clear, the function of power produced and mobilised in Prevent goes beyond these bounds. Rather, it will be argued, it constitutes a novel approach to managing threats. It represents the production of a newly realised social space, that of individuals who may become violent, and is a problematic capable of encompassing all who may engage in political violence. This chapter then analyses the political consequences of

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
An interview with Michael Lillis

confidence in the fairness and acceptability of the court system in the North. What we were suggesting was mixed three-man courts on both sides of the border for crimes that were associated with, shall we say, political inspiration. Goodall was certainly taken aback by this approach. Initially we had a good long walk along the canal in Dublin after one of the Intergovernmental meetings and kept going back and forth to discuss this. Goodall certainly had difficulty in believing that this was coming with the authority of the

in Inside Accounts, Volume I

This second of two volumes on the Irish Government’s role in forging the Good Friday Agreement of 1998 and implementing the political power-sharing mechanisms and institutions that followed provides the most expansive account yet of the peace process from the Irish perspective. Drawing from extended interviews with key officials and political leaders, this volume details the challenges faced in managing the peace process to reach agreement, before working to oversee the establishment and implementation of the institutions that resulted from agreement. The interviews in this volume address key areas such a building relationships, trust, confidence, strategic management, pragmatism, engaging militant protagonists and meeting the challenges of leadership, to create a definitive picture of the issues faced by the Irish Government in the attempt to end conflict in Northern Ireland.

The politics of Prevent

How can potential future terrorists be identified? Forming one of the four pillars of the United Kingdom’s counter-terrorism strategy CONTEST, Prevent seeks to answer, and act on, this question. Occupying a central role in security debates post-9/11, Prevent is concerned with understanding and tackling radicalisation. It carries the promise of early intervention into the lives of those who may be on a pathway to violence.

This book offers an innovative account of the Prevent policy, situating it as a novel form of power that has played a central role in the production and the policing of contemporary British identity. Drawing on interviews with those at the heart of Prevent’s development, the book provides readers with an in-depth history and conceptualisation of the policy. The book demonstrates that Prevent is an ambitious new way of thinking about violence that has led to the creation of a radical new role for the state: tackling vulnerability to radicalisation. Foregrounding the analytical relationship between security, identity and temporality in Prevent, this book situates the policy as central to contemporary identity politics in the UK. Detailing the history of the policy, and the concepts and practices that have been developed within Prevent, this book critically engages with the assumptions on which they are based and the forms of power they mobilise.

In providing a timely history and analysis of British counter-radicalisation policy, this book will be of interests to students and academics interested in contemporary security policy and domestic responses to the ‘War on Terror’.

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The interviews in this book provide detail and personal reflections on the shift from exclusive political processes to an inclusive political process in an attempt to achieve peace in Northern Ireland. The failure of Sunningdale, which condemned Northern Ireland to another twenty-five years of violence, revealed the shortcomings of not having joint government participation to support power-sharing and of a lack of will (especially on the part of the British) to make the initiative work. The Anglo-Irish Agreement

in Inside Accounts, Volume I
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The interview testimony in this book points to a range of influences that, to a greater or lesser extent, informed the structure, trajectory and outcomes of the Northern Ireland peace process. Central to reaching the Good Friday Agreement of 1998 was intense and tenacious engagement from both the British and Irish Governments, along with the efforts of those political parties

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
An interview with David Donoghue

new Agreement to propose a wide range of specific and detailed reforms. With the advent of the Anglo-Irish Agreement, we had to ensure that we had persuasive arguments in all the areas under discussion and to develop issues for in-depth handling with the British through the new machinery. For this, we needed to increase considerably both our technical expertise as well as our broader political

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
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Prevent as a specific assemblage, responding to a novel problematisation of threat, it becomes possible to situate the policy as one that is integral to understanding the terrain of the UK’s contemporary identity politics. As the book has shown, this has resulted in two sets of practices, that, although they mobilise different forms of power, find coherence as a function that seeks to secure the future through transforming those identities deemed risky. The first set of practices emerge as a means of governing environments

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity