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Andrea M. Szkil

The subject of forensic specialist‘s work with human remains in the aftermath of conflict has remained largely unexplored within the existing literature. Drawing upon anthropological fieldwork conducted from 2009–10 in three mortuary facilities overseen by the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), this article analyses observations of and interviews with ICMP forensic specialists as a means of gaining insight into their experiences with the remains of people who went missing during the 1992–95 war in BiH. The article specifically focuses on how forensic specialists construct and maintain their professional identities within an emotionally charged situation. Through analysing forensic specialists encounters with human remains, it is argued that maintaining a professional identity requires ICMP forensic specialists to navigate between emotional attachment and engagement according to each situation.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse
Juliano Fiori

’t necessarily join NGOs like MSF because they don’t have professional experience in humanitarian work. They specifically want to do something in Europe rather than going to Bangladesh or Syria or Iraq. It is really this idea of dealing with a European issue, in Europe, in a way that might bring about political change, without being embedded in a political party. This is a new type of political engagement and politics – different to that which inspired previous generations of humanitarian workers. SOS acknowledges the fact that dealing with migration today in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

, a new and optimistic, less direct but technologically updated humanitarianism has confidently stepped forth. More de-risked and requiring less professional expertise than the labour-intensive direct engagement of the past, it is a cheaper Western humanitarianism designed for connectivity rather than circulation. Often called humanitarian innovation ( ALNAP, 2009 ; Betts and Bloom, 2014 ), a feature of this new humanitarianism is its enthusiastic embrace of adaptive design ( Ramalingam et al ., 2014 ; HPG, 2018 ). Moreover, unlike autonomous

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Emmanuelle Strub

managing proof of identity. The idea was not just to better prepare for managing a kidnapping but also to clearly inform volunteers that the risk existed. The resources available when I took the position in early 2012 had not changed since the position was created in 2006. There was one person positioned in the technical support and advocacy department – a department that consisted of about a dozen, mainly medical, technical advisors. And while the department was part of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

practicality prevents it). This is the same foundational commitment that animates human rights work. The humanist core to both of these forms of social practice is a similar kind of belief in the ultimate priority of moral claims made by human beings as human beings rather than as possessors of any markers of identity or citizenship. What differences exist between humanitarianism and human rights are largely sociological – the contextual specifics of the evolution of two different forms of social activism. I have argued elsewhere, for example, that the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

as to whether they also need to disclose personal details about their patient (the victim) including his identity. 93 In practice there would seem to be little the police could act on without such personal information and the GMC is virtually mandating disclosure in such cases. What of cases where the public interest is not so much in the prevention of crime, but in the detection or prosecution of crime? The Serious Crimes Act 2015 ss 70–75 requires health and social care professionals to report cases of female genital mutilation in girls under eighteen. In many

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

for any significant procedure’. The 2009 Guidance does not contain model consent forms. The Department’s aim is to ensure that healthcare professionals appreciate the need to give patients the information to which they are entitled. Consent forms should ensure that patients appreciate that they are entitled to ask questions and to demand explanations about what is to be done to them. They should cover anaesthetic procedures as well as surgery. As the Supreme Court in Montgomery has now made abundantly clear, patients are not passive recipients of what the doctor

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Abstract only
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

. The shocking incident at Northwick Park continued a trend of diminishing confidence in the regulation of research. In 2000, inquiries were held into allegations that research was carried out on newborn babies without parental consent in a hospital in North Staffordshire. 6 Scandals surrounding retention of body parts originated in Bristol and Liverpool with evidence of children’s body parts being retained for research without their parents’ consent or knowledge. 7 And in 2010 Andrew Wakefield was struck off the medical register for serious professional misconduct

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Richard Parrish

Gutiérrez Díaz MEP in October 1991 on safety in professional boxing.9 The third motion suggested that a common logo should be worn by athletes from the 12 Community member states taking part in the Barcelona Olympic Games.10 Written by Mrs Muscardini MEP, the motion recognised the symbolic significance of sport and sought to use this to promote European integration. The common logo would, according to Muscardini, symbolise the athletes membership of the EU as an ideal and unified homeland and as an appeal for democracy for all the people’s of Europe. The fourth motion for

in Sports law and policy in the European Union