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Ian McEwan’s The Children Act and the limits of the legal practices in Menke’s ‘Law and violence’

the negotiating are themselves already affected by the processes by which individuals are made subjects of the law. In his bleak view, legal practices “produce a form of subjectivity that underpins or causes social domination.”3 The violence of the law is always already in place in the very structure of our identities. Menke doesn’t make the case for this claim in full in the later text on Marx, but refers back to his essay on law and violence. I shall be commenting later in my essay on some aspects of the claim, particularly on its debt to Rousseau’s strangely

in Law and violence
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interviewer  – a younger, female, British academic, usually welcomed in her professional capacity, but sometimes spoken to as a grandchild or treated as a guest invited to tea  – and the interviewees. Evidently this relationship affected the content of the material, not least because French is not my native language. How the interviewees saw me varied. Some linked me directly to the bombers. Maurice Masse, his home destroyed by the RAF in 1942, praised my endeavour to investigate what he considered a shameful part of British history: ‘If only all the English were like you

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45

in the first instance – to understand that whatever was said to condemn the Allies was rejected by the French. While professional historians may disagree, and archive evidence certainly indicates that many French people held anti-Allied sentiments, the Thomas brothers’ perspective should not be dismissed: it is an important narrative trope that permits the composure of personal, family, generational and national identity; it is a way of making sense of the past. Propaganda is a public instrument that aims to act upon the private individual, manipulating ideas

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45

enable their location, such that when they come to light, a whole network of actors is deployed, such that they can be identified and brought back to a secure identity. It is constitutive of its own boundaries; boundaries that are not sanctioned by law nor cohere with British territoriality, and are the responsibility of a vast range of professionals to police and enforce. In demonstrating that Prevent is constitutive of a diagram of power that enacts a logic that combines security, identity and temporality, this

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
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exterior, those who are deemed secure and those who must be deemed threatening in their potential. Prevent then polices this line. Not through the criminal justice system, but through mobilising the circulations of ideas and identities within communities and institutions, and the pastoral duties of care held by professionals, in order to act on these risky identifications. Chapter 5 argued that the analysis of communities developed within conceptions of cohesion is carried through into Prevent, uniting the two policies

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
Vulnerability, extremism and

, ‘Britishness’ and ‘British values’. The next two chapters, in articulating the assemblage of counter-radicalisation that implements Prevent, will show how this takes concrete effect, targeting specific behaviours, identities and communities. Here, though, the intention is to show the problematic of vulnerability to radicalisation renders an uncertain future as knowable. Vulnerability, it will be shown, is positioned within the policy, as those subjects and spaces that are deemed disassociated from ‘Britishness’ and ‘British

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
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Identifying individuals who

institutional processes, encompassing a range of professionals, in order to govern individuals identified as at risk. This chapter will start by charting the historical and institutional development of the Channel project. The second section then establishes the key mechanism through which it traverses the temporal gap: the ‘vulnerability indicator’. These indicators identify the behaviours and identities that are considered risky, thus requiring attention and perhaps intervention. It is then through a close textual analysis of these

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
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should support the cultural and religious beliefs of those communities. Yet these investigations go far beyond mere questions of pedagogy. 2 At stake within the Trojan Horse scandal is a novel question: has this promotion of an Islamic culture, and this distance from ‘British values’, engendered within these children a vulnerability to radicalisation? This question links security and identity in important and novel ways. ‘Trojan Horse’ was not a scandal because of the identification of terrorists or the promotion of

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity

This chapter will outline the academic literature that has developed around the Prevent policy. The chapter argues that, for the most part, the literature has, historically, failed to go beyond the political debates and policy narratives articulated in the previous chapter . The first section will demonstrate that the literature has often presented the ‘solution’ to Prevent to be one of separating its identity and security strands. It is a literature that therefore, like the policy’s internal debates, positions the

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity

throughout society by a range of professionals.  From ‘violent’ to ‘non-violent’ extremism Nevertheless, while this change in the machinery of government and implementation of Prevent distances it from a focus on identities and values, alongside this move is a clear discursive shift that troubles this distinction. The second important change in this iteration is that of moving away from a language of violent extremism to one of merely ‘extremism’ or ‘non-violent’ extremism. The argument is that extremist groups

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity