Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 117 items for :

  • professional identity x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
Clear All

enable their location, such that when they come to light, a whole network of actors is deployed, such that they can be identified and brought back to a secure identity. It is constitutive of its own boundaries; boundaries that are not sanctioned by law nor cohere with British territoriality, and are the responsibility of a vast range of professionals to police and enforce. In demonstrating that Prevent is constitutive of a diagram of power that enacts a logic that combines security, identity and temporality, this

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
Abstract only

exterior, those who are deemed secure and those who must be deemed threatening in their potential. Prevent then polices this line. Not through the criminal justice system, but through mobilising the circulations of ideas and identities within communities and institutions, and the pastoral duties of care held by professionals, in order to act on these risky identifications. Chapter 5 argued that the analysis of communities developed within conceptions of cohesion is carried through into Prevent, uniting the two policies

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
Vulnerability, extremism and

, ‘Britishness’ and ‘British values’. The next two chapters, in articulating the assemblage of counter-radicalisation that implements Prevent, will show how this takes concrete effect, targeting specific behaviours, identities and communities. Here, though, the intention is to show the problematic of vulnerability to radicalisation renders an uncertain future as knowable. Vulnerability, it will be shown, is positioned within the policy, as those subjects and spaces that are deemed disassociated from ‘Britishness’ and ‘British

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
Abstract only
Identifying individuals who

institutional processes, encompassing a range of professionals, in order to govern individuals identified as at risk. This chapter will start by charting the historical and institutional development of the Channel project. The second section then establishes the key mechanism through which it traverses the temporal gap: the ‘vulnerability indicator’. These indicators identify the behaviours and identities that are considered risky, thus requiring attention and perhaps intervention. It is then through a close textual analysis of these

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
Abstract only

should support the cultural and religious beliefs of those communities. Yet these investigations go far beyond mere questions of pedagogy. 2 At stake within the Trojan Horse scandal is a novel question: has this promotion of an Islamic culture, and this distance from ‘British values’, engendered within these children a vulnerability to radicalisation? This question links security and identity in important and novel ways. ‘Trojan Horse’ was not a scandal because of the identification of terrorists or the promotion of

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity

This chapter will outline the academic literature that has developed around the Prevent policy. The chapter argues that, for the most part, the literature has, historically, failed to go beyond the political debates and policy narratives articulated in the previous chapter . The first section will demonstrate that the literature has often presented the ‘solution’ to Prevent to be one of separating its identity and security strands. It is a literature that therefore, like the policy’s internal debates, positions the

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity

throughout society by a range of professionals.  From ‘violent’ to ‘non-violent’ extremism Nevertheless, while this change in the machinery of government and implementation of Prevent distances it from a focus on identities and values, alongside this move is a clear discursive shift that troubles this distinction. The second important change in this iteration is that of moving away from a language of violent extremism to one of merely ‘extremism’ or ‘non-violent’ extremism. The argument is that extremist groups

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
Abstract only
Security politics and identity policy

– ‘harsher penalties for inciting terrorism and longer detention for terror suspects . . . including granting police wider powers to arrest and detain suspects’ – and a deeper identity politics that was seeking to impose a particular vision of Australianness and reinterpret multiculturalism ‘with an emphasis on shared values and secularism’ ( Colman, 2005 ; Kerin, 2005 ). What this

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Abstract only

February 2005 allows entrance into the discussion of the Colombian case from the critical security and peace studies perspective offered in this book: political identities and imaginaries being shaped by a state security discourse that underwrites the meaning of peace. My main concern in writing this book has been the violent spiral of war that is created by the security programme of the Colombian state, which produces

in In/security in Colombia
Exploring the spectrum of Irish immigrants in the wartime British health sector

, migration history has been dominated by narratives of unskilled workers. Granted, unskilled work was the majority experience for Irish migrants over the last two centuries: domestic service for women, navvying or unskilled labouring for men. Even in the immediate post-war period Irish-born men in unskilled work outnumbered those in professional and technical professions by three to

in Medicine, health and Irish experiences of conflict 1914–45