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‘Symbols of defiance’ from the print to the digital age

15 Punk zines: ‘symbols of defiance’ from the print to the digital age Matt Grimes and Tim Wall In this chapter we examine the development of punk fanzines from the late 1970s to the present, exploring the role of these music fan-produced publications in giving meaning to the experience of a music community. This discussion of the punk fanzine’s longitudinal existence allows us to investigate the variety of ways that the fanzines and webzines make sense of punk as music, a set of political ideas and as a subcultural scene. In particular we want to trace the way

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The struggle for post-modern authenticity

4 Immigrant punk: the struggle for post-modern authenticity Ivan Gololobov I know, I’m stranger in your land I know, ladies and gentlemen I know, I am coming here to stay And take your jobs away.1 Punk is often regarded as a subculture essentially based on the principles of authenticity.2 In most general terms, following Taylor, authenticity is understood as an ability to break external impositions and to express one’s own Self.3 The reverse of this term is coined by Adorno who regards inauthenticity as a situation where ‘something broken is implied’; he

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Exploring the articulation of identity by older women punks

3 Playing a-minor in the punk scene? Exploring the articulation of identity by older women punks Laura Way Punk has retained its presence in the subcultural literature that has flourished since the Birmingham University Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) was established in the 1960s. But while theoretical shifts away from the assumed link between youth and subcultural participation have drawn attention to ageing within a subculture, there continues to be a notable absence of women in such analysis. To help rectify this, I intend here to utilise

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An interview with Jon Savage

Afterword The cultural impact of punk: an interview with Jon Savage Matthew Worley Among the numerous accounts of punk’s origins and early development that now exist, Jon Savage’s England’s Dreaming (1991) is peerless. Combining sharp critical analysis with participatory insight, it locates British punk squarely within its socio-economic, cultural and political context. Indeed, Savage’s reading of punk may be traced back to his 1976-produced fanzine London’s Outrage, which interspersed media clippings and pop cultural references with an essay forewarning Britain

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British DIY punk as a form of cultural resistance

12 ‘Punk belongs to the punx, not business men!’: British DIY punk as a form of cultural resistance Michelle Liptrot At the start of the British punk phenomenon, the journalist John Collis wrote ‘punk rock is designed simply to make money’.1 Thirty-six years on there seems to have been some accuracy in Collis’s prediction. For example, the construction and commodification that was integral to punk from the beginning can be illustrated by the fact that Malcolm McLaren put together his ‘punk project’ in the form of the London band, the Sex Pistols.2 McLaren

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Punk, politics and resistance

The Subcultures Network is a cross-disciplinary research network for scholars and students interested in the relationship between subcultures (in all their forms) and wider processes of social, cultural and political change. Bringing together theoretical analyses, empirical studies and methodological discussions, the network is designed to explore the relationships between subcultures and their historical context, and the place of subcultures within patterns of cultural and political change. This book is very much a product of the Network's brief and emerged, in large part, from the inaugural symposium held at London Metropolitan University in September 2011. The book is divided into three parts, each with a broadly defined theme. The first of these relates to punk and identity, particularly with regard to gender, class, age and race. The second part looks at punk's relationship to locality and space. In particular, it deals with two overlapping processes. First, the ways in which punk's transmission allowed for diverse interpretation and utilisation of the cultural form beyond local, regional and national boundaries. Second, the extent to which punk's aesthetic and expression was shaped by, inspired and reflected the environments in which its protagonists lived. The third and final part concentrates on communication and reception. From within the culture, the language of punk is brought under discursive analysis by Melani Schröter, who looks at the critiques of 'normality' contained within the lyrics of German punk bands from the late 1970s through to the present day.

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From protest to resistance

Introduction: from protest to resistance Matthew Worley, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Sian Lincoln, Bill Osgerby, Lucy Robinson, John Street, Peter Webb Rumours of punk’s death have long been exaggerated. The earliest known record of its passing was Monday 20 September 1976, the first of a two-day ‘Punk Special’ held at London’s 100 Club featuring the Sex Pistols, The Clash and a handful of other bands converging towards a distinctive scene based on stripped-down rock ’n’ roll and a confrontational aesthetic at odds with mainstream pop culture and the last

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Debates over cultural conventions in French punk

7 Distortions in distance: debates over cultural conventions in French punk Jonathyne Briggs On 6 May 1968, a cadre of French police entered the Sorbonne to restore order, called by administrators in response to the alleged destruction of auditorium chairs, three to be exact, caused by the student occupation that began earlier that weekend in protest against the actions of administrators at the Nanterre campus. The subsequent mêlée between the police and students sparked broader protests, as young workers instigated a series of strikes through France during the

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Auteurship and exploitation in the history of punk cinema

11 Silver screen sedition: auteurship and exploitation in the history of punk cinema Bill Osgerby ‘Will your school be next?’: mischief and mayhem at Vince Lombardi High Teen rebellion is a force to be reckoned with at Vince Lombardi High School. The setting for the punk-musical-comedy Rock ’n’ Roll High School (1979), Lombardi High has seen a succession of principals driven to despair by the recalcitrant students. Led by Riff Randell (P. J. Soles) – a nonstop party girl and fervid fan of punk stalwarts, the Ramones – the school kids are a font of adolescent

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Fighting masculinity on the Russian punk scene

-1‘If you want to live, you better know how to fight’: fighting masculinity on the Russian punk scene -Hilary Pilkington- The discussion of masculinity and femininity on punk scenes is a relatively recent phenomenon.1 The emphasis in published work to date has been on reclaiming young women’s experience and practice; driven, in part, by their increasing visibility thanks to the emergence of the Riot Grrrl scene in the 1990s. The broad consensus reached might be encapsulated in LeBlanc’s conclusion that ‘gender is problematic for punk girls in a way that it is

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