Search results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • Literature and Theatre x
  • Manchester Film Studies x
Clear All
Queer phenomenology, and cultural and religious commodifi cation in Hanif Kureishi’s My Beautiful Laundrette (1985) and The Buddha of Suburbia (1990)

1970s rock and pop music does not cloud his judgement regarding the pitfalls of subcultural forms of youthful resistance becoming culturally appropriated and commodified. During a punk gig both characters attend together in London, we are told: [T]‌he carrot-haired kid cursed us to death. He seemed to be yelling direct at Charlie and me. I could feel Charlie getting tense beside me. I knew London was killing us as I heard, ‘Fuck off, all you smelly old hippies! You fucking slags! You ugly fart-breaths! Fuck off

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Criminal minds, CSI: NY and Law and order

provides striking evidence of the limits of tattooing as a sign, or at least a stable sign, of feminist struggle. ‘Oedipus Hex’ presents us with precisely this tension between alternative feminist embodiment and (for the most part) masculine consumption. The episode focuses on the murder of a Suicide Girl immediately after a sexually-charged performance at a ‘punk show’. Initially, suspicion falls on her fellow Suicide Girls, before the murderer is revealed as a male tattoo artist. With members of the SuicideGirls ( SG ) community playing

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives

’s ‘provocative self-fashioning sets her tough looks up against the history of her childhood, which, as it unfolds in the courtroom, renders her punk masquerade into a pathetic and painful cover for her broken childhood and her status as ward of the state’ ( 2016 : 355). At this point in the story, Salander has grown up and gained further insights about the world around her. She is well aware of the impression her appearance makes, and skilfully uses this to her advantage. DAVID LAGERCRANTZ’S TAKE ON SALANDER’S TATTOOS David

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
Abstract only
Tattoos, transgenics, and tech-noir in Dark angel

individual, albeit socially-engineered, identity for her. The barcode denotes ownership of the subject, and their role as a function of an organisation. Likewise, the barcode functions both as a military group tattoo and a secret society tattoo. 5 Dark angel translates this ‘secret society’ body-mark into a cyber- or bio-punk context, and uses barcodes to indicate membership of a covert subgroup concerned with quasi-military actions and/or assassinations. The genetic barcode tattoos in Dark angel remain unique and individual. 6 Dark angel

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
Queering ethnicity and British Muslim masculinities in Sally El Hosaini’s My Brother the Devil (2012)

confrontational sound, has been the most significant and controversial musical expression to emerge from the UK since punk. Essentially an authentic response to hip hop, it conveyed the hopes and frustrations of an apolitical generation locked into London’s decaying housing estates’ ( www.dontcallmeurban.com/info.html ). Because of the lack of a party-political approach, grime may be considered a micropolitical response to older forms of black counterculture, such as hip hop, and arising culturally from the direct experiences of London’s council estate inhabitants; hence, it is

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film

Rock You’ were partially a response to the increasingly male-centred punk culture emerging in the 1970s, as well as a move to encourage audience participation at concerts. Queen’s guitarist, Brian May, recalls that this song was a response to a particular phase in Queen’s career, when the audience was becoming a bigger

in Medieval film
Abstract only
Anatomy of a metaphor

John Payne, ‘Third ear’, L. A. Weekly (17–23 November 2000), p. 61. See also bands such as Corvus Corax, which mix medieval musical style and costumes with both glam and punk rock motifs. 15 Elizabeth Wilson, The Sphinx in the City: Urban Life, The Control of Disorder, and Women (Berkeley

in Medieval film