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have done earlier if not for institutional obstacles – has existing theoretical argument about race, whiteness and postsocialist identities on which to build, even though so far it has not reframed the discipline's conversations in the way that the 1990s adaptations of Said still make ‘Europe’/‘Balkan’ and ‘western’/‘eastern’ Europe constructions live themes. This is not to say that postsocialist translations of postcolonialism are static. Queer studies, in particular, have injected new energy into the postsocialism–postcolonialism conjunction, in

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Critical theory and the affective turn

poststructuralism of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari; the queer theory of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick; the literary and cultural criticism of Lauren Berlant; the affect theory of Brian Massumi; the deconstructionism of Jacques Derrida; the theories of the postmodern of Jean-​François Lyotard and Fredric Jameson; the cosmopolitanism of Seyla Benhabib; the cyborg feminism of Donna Haraway; the post-​secular rationalism of Jürgen Habermas; the socialist-​ humanism of Zygmunt Bauman; and the ubiquitous Lacanian-​ Hegelianism of Slavoj Žižek, to name just some of the most prominent

in Critical theory and feeling

place of process, act, satisfaction, and so truly keep the promise of dialectical logic that it would culminate in its origin. None of the abstract concepts come closer to the fulfilled utopia than that of eternal peace’; Adorno, Minima Moralia, 157. 5 Fredric Jameson, Archaeologies of the Future: The Desire Called Utopia and Other Science Fictions (London: Verso, 2005), xiii. 6 Wendy Brown, ‘Resisting Left Melancholy’, boundary 2 26/​3 (1999): 26. For a critique of Brown’s argument from a queer perspective, see Heather Love, Feeling Backward:  Loss and the

in Critical theory and feeling
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?

identity discourses on to somewhere which, by not sharing Britain's colonial history, also lacked Britain's insecurities about race, meant I did not even write down a citation. Scholarship by feminist and queer writers of colour, and campaigns to decentre Eurocentrism and whiteness at UK universities, would challenge me to rethink my past work on post-Yugoslav identities, as would listening on Twitter to a philosopher of critical race theory I had first followed for her disability activism, and trying to understand what I had meant when, teaching at

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Singular experiences

with certain minor characters, the four main characters being intended, in one of the book’s meanings, to be aspects of the same man, or of the human spirit, and two of them, Hugh and the 13 Malcolm Lowry, Under the Volcano 133 Consul, more obviously are’, in Lowry, ‘Letter to Cape’, in The Voyage that Never Ends, p. 389. 11 A trope he employs with other characters in the novel, and in Swinging the Maelstrom there are further clear examples: ‘And as the old man talked on and on, the confused story of his wandering, which sometime queerly resembled the story of

in The Existential drinker
Abstract only
Melancholic dispositions and conscious unhappiness

an indicative litany of texts that have contributed to this turn to happiness; see Ahmed, The Promise of Happiness, 3–​7. 69 Davies, The Happiness Industry. 70 Richard Layard, Happiness:  Lessons from a New Science (London:  Penguin, 2006), 5–​6. 71 This demonization of discontent is also expressed in the mainstream media through a stifling politics of ‘respectability’, which merely serves as a cover for reinforcing established norms. For example, radical feminists and queer critics of both heteronormativity and homonormativity are often depicted as ‘killjoys

in Critical theory and feeling

majorities' hierarchical advantage. Gilroy's argument that ‘[r]acism … assumes new forms and articulates new antagonisms through time and history’ (Gilroy 1987 : 11), which Sardelić ( 2014 : 208) quotes, enables him to read attacks on multi-ethnic cultural heritage in Sarajevo ordered by Republika Srpska (RS) authorities as part of the same conflict between ‘neo-fascism’ and pluralist democracy that motivated Front Nationale-controlled municipalities in 1990s France to seek to ban films with queer content or rap music resisting police (Gilroy 2000 : 280). Still

in Race and the Yugoslav region