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International Humanist and Ethical Union (London, 12 March 2011). 10 Braidotti (2008), p. 6. For the argument that gay or queer’ rights are being appropriated in a similar fashion, see J. Butler, ‘Sexual Politics, Torture and Secular Time’, The British Journal of Sociology 59:1 (March 2008 ), 1–23; J. Haritaworn, with T. Tauquir, E. Erdem, ‘Gay Imperialism: Gender and

in Infidel feminism
Irish-American fables of resistance

Ultimately, Gordon finds for herself everything that is attractive and honourable in the Church to be deposited in individuals and groups and these direct us to the deepest legacy of Catholicism: people who profess to be Catholics: I’m in a queer position: the Church of my childhood, which was so important for my formation as an artist, is now gone. As Gertrude Stein said of Oakland, ‘There is no there there’. But there is something there, something that formed me and that touches me still: the example of the nuns killed in El Salvador, of liberation theologians standing

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism

varied relationship with crusading, hitherto largely neglected.44 Further removed from classical crusade studies, in books such as Medieval Film and Queer Movie Medievalisms, the genre of film studies argues for the inclusion of this popular medium as conveying serious interpretive messages, from Cecil B. de Mille’s The Crusades (1935) to Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven (2005), the latter’s fundamental, meretricious historical errors nonetheless attracting the fury of Muslim activists and right-wing Christians alike.45 The Crusades and politics Such reactions to

in The Debate on the Crusades

knowledge of elsewhere, either in the Rev. Nicholson’s reports or the court documents. All of these stories parallel aspects of English witchcraft tradition: Izzard is said, for example, to have bewitched the wife of her creditor, the innkeeper and grocer, ‘making her go through all sorts of queer antics, even to dancing on the tea table among the cups and saucers’ ( Magic dancing; Enchanted persons dance until released ; Witch

in Witchcraft Continued
Manchester Quakers and refugees, 1933–1937

Ellis’s view that Kruger’s incessant importuning had ‘queered the pitch amongst the Manchester Friends’ for other refugees; in June 1938 the ISC washed its hands of him.53 90 Manchester Quakers and refugees, 1933–1937 It may be that the ISC had not yet recognised the scale of the problem. In April 1936 it decided that it had ‘no use at present’ for two cottages in the Lake District, one in Keswick, one above Ullswater, offered (through Bertha Bracey) for possible use by German refugees.54 Two months later it declared that it had ‘no way of alleviating [the] distress

in ‘Jews and other foreigners’

number of meanings throughout history’ (1983: 566). This instability endures and feminist, postcolonialist, queer and liberationist theo logians continue actively to dispute and deconstruct the term. Recognition of the signifi cance of human practice for theological refl ection has shifted our understanding of theological thinking in recent years. There has also been a growing awareness of the signifi cance of the imagination in the work of the theologian. The fact that narrative, metaphor and allegory are now owned as integral to the discourses of theology has not

in Literature, theology and feminism

though. Most people need ‘right’ answers just as they need ‘superior’ races … At this particular moment it happens to be feminists and other socially marginal types who are battling for cultural pluralism. Still, this is an activity which we’re undertaking on behalf of humanity, all of whom would be the happier, I believe, were they to throw away their addiction to fi nal solutions. (1993: 123) Queer loves The work of Ostriker represents an approach to the narrative traditions of faith that is appealing to those women who wish to challenge their inheritance without

in Literature, theology and feminism
Israel as a role model in liberal thought

have become more prosperous – that is all.’ Kingscourt still finds all of this hard to believe. ‘You are queer fellows, you Muslims,’ he insists. ‘Don’t you regard these Jews as intruders?’ To this Reschid Bey replies: ‘You speak strangely, Christian. Would you call a man a robber who takes nothing from you, but brings you something instead? The Jews have enriched us. Why should we be angry with them? They dwell among us like brothers. Why should we not love them? […] excuse my saying so, but I did The West within the East 149 not learn tolerance in the Occident

in Zionism in Arab discourses

Conception, p. 54. Theodora Jankowski, Pure resistance: queer virginity in early modern English drama (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000), p. 84. Orby Shipley, ‘The Blessed Virgin’, in Lee (ed.), Miscellaneous sermons, p. 215. (Jane Elizabeth Leeson) The wreath of lilies: a gift for the young (London: James Burns, 1847), p. 172. Lk 11: 27–8. Williams, Female characters, p. 323; see also Newman, ‘Our Lady in the gospel’, pp. 85–6; Newman ‘The glories of Mary for the sake of her son’, pp. 350–1; Ullathorne, The Immaculate Conception, p. 14. The golden

in Victorians and the Virgin Mary
Manchester and the Basque children of 1937

‘next week they would all go [back] to Bilbao’.169 Perceptions of a welcoming public had also begun to pale: faced by ‘staring’ and ‘whispering’ onlookers, the children had begun to see English people as ‘queer and unpleasant’.170 As to the children’s more exotic qualities, in responding to a request from the BBC, the house committee at Watermillock discovered that none of the children could sing and none knew any Basque songs.171 Such cracks in the stability of life at Watermillock produced neither the internal breakdown which Willcock had feared nor any sort of

in ‘Jews and other foreigners’