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Lindsey Dodd

railway station Fives-Lille. Contemporaneous with the nearby marshalling yard at Saint-Sauveur, this was the oldest complex of heavy goods stations in Lille, dating from the 1860s. A  large rail and locomotive workshop abutted Fives-Lille, along the southern edge of the commune of Hellemmes. Just north was the biggest local employer, the Usine de Fives. Nearby were other factories, notably Peugeot in Fives, and textile manufacturers in Hellemmes. West of Lille, there was a freight station at the river port, and in 1921, another giant freight station and marshalling yard

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

installations – factories, railway depots, and so on – were surrounded by the communities whose members worked in them. Home and family were at the centre of children’s worlds, and journeys across bombed towns to find them were nailed to adult memories of the aftermath. Children also encountered death – first-, second- and third-hand – in the wake of air raids; these were public, violent deaths, that contributed to juvenile understanding of war and bombing. War drew the public and private realms together, but wedged between state and citizen was community. Assistance in the

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

the German Embassy in Paris and by the Propaganda Abteilung, which received orders directly from Goebbels’ Propaganda Ministry.1 From July 1940, all regional newspapers were put under German supervision; the Paris press flourished.2 With more than five million radio sets in France, the airwaves also became a key battleground.3 Radio-Paris broadcast widely, making a star of militant right-winger, Jean Hérold-Paquis. v 168 v Explaining bombing to the public With German financing, the station recruited talented broadcasters; it was pro-German, anti-Semitic, anti

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

housing blocks. Since 1940, the possibility of using the Metro had been mooted, depending on safety modifications, but the insufficient building materials stalled the project.33 However, parts of certain tunnels were opened from June 1942 following public outcry.34 People turned instinctively to the Metro. The capacity of the authorised tunnels was 1,200 people. During the alert of 22 October 1942, 10,000 people crowded into Marcel Sembat station; following the air raids of September 1943, more than 15,000 people crushed into the Pont de Sèvres station.35 In Brest

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

particularly damaging. Those bombed for the first time during the heaviest raids of spring 1944 found the experience especially frightening, as for Michel Jean-Bart and Pierre Haigneré near the Lille-Délivrance railway station, Édith Denhez in Cambrai and Max Potter in the La Chapelle district of Paris. Children who were bombed more frequently, like those in Brest or Hellemmes, began to incorporate the inconvenience and the anxiety into daily life. Learning happened during the moment itself, as noises acquired meaning, and in the aftermath, which so vividly illustrated the

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
The critique of British expansionism
Vicky Randall

Pacific. In Jenkins’ opinion these places were simply ‘stations for trade and various Imperial purposes’. 24 As Jenkins acknowledged, his plans for Imperial Federation would involve a fundamental transformation of the existing political system. It would be necessary, most importantly, to establish a new ‘senate’ or ‘parliament of representatives’ in London. 25 In this senate, members from every colony would meet to discuss and to determine, by majority vote, issues relating to the empire as a whole. 26 Such issues might include the regulation of trade and commerce

in History, empire, and Islam
Jean-Hervé Bradol and Marc Le Pape

. One MSF health centre was still functioning. On 18 November, a cholera treatment unit was set up in a transit camp on the Rwandan side of the border, and within a day, MSF and Medical Emergency Relief International (Merlin) each treated fifty cases. A number of way stations had been set up along the road between Gisenyi and Ruhengeri – a distance of eighty kilometres – and all were equipped to treat

in Humanitarian aid, genocide and mass killings
Geographical networks of auxiliary medical care in the First World War
Ronan Foley

, utilising a range of wood–metal–steam geographies. 36 Stretchers, ambulances, ships, ambulance trains, railways and canals were identifiably non-human components of this relational geography. 37 Official war histories show sketch drawings of the front-line arrangements 38 a micro-scale network of dressing-stations, stretcher parties and ultimate connection to CCS and

in Medicine, health and Irish experiences of conflict 1914–45
Lessons from the health sector
Brian Ó Caoindealbháin and Patricia Clarke

power station near the border on the river Erne, the details of collaboration were worked out by public officials on both sides, with no direct contact between the two governments. It was not until 1951 that ministers met face to face, the first such contact since 1925, when the company which operated the Belfast-Dublin railway service was threatened with closure. Pragmatism over

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
Abstract only
Temple Street Hospital and the 1916 Rising
Barry Kennerk

. ‘An awful week of strain and terror’ By 1916, Dublin's hospital network had been temporarily reconfigured in consequence of the war. Temple Street and its staff struggled to meet the demands of the war, but, arguably, the proximity of relief hospitals and Red Cross stations also meant that they were far better equipped to cope with the difficulties

in Medicine, health and Irish experiences of conflict 1914–45