Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • religious congregation x
  • Manchester Religious Studies x
  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All
The biblical identity politics of the Demerara Slave Rebellion
John Coffey

A rich variety of other materials illuminate the religious culture of Bethel Chapel – missionary correspondence, LMS reports, the church's hymn book, colonial records, newspapers and eyewitness accounts of the rebellion. This chapter will mine the sources to reconstruct the biblical identity politics of Bethel Chapel and its insurgents. The first section will analyse how John Smith employed the Bible to forge a new identity for his congregation. Section two will turn to the more difficult task of piecing together fragmentary evidence of an

in Chosen peoples
The nineteenth-century roots of segregationist folk theology in the American South
Stephen R. Haynes

In March 1965 a new church was founded in Memphis, Tennessee. Although there was no shortage of churches in the city, it became necessary to launch a new congregation, because racial conflict had precipitated a split at the 3,500-member Second Presbyterian church when it became clear that hardline segregationists were no longer welcome there. The issue had been whether the church's Session – its board of lay leaders – should admit groups of black and white students who had come intending to worship on about a dozen occasions between March 1964

in Chosen peoples
Abstract only
Gareth Atkins, Shinjini Das and Brian H. Murray

In Chapter 1 of this volume John Coffey shows how controverted passages from the Book of Joshua and slave congregations’ understandings of them were probed in court in the famous trial of their pastor, the Congregationalist missionary John Smith. Biblical stories thus shaped and were in turn shaped by identities and power dynamics. Building on the burgeoning but often disparate scholarships of print culture, translation, biblical scholarship and the institutions that nurtured it, the postcolonial Bible and global religious movements, this book makes an ambitious

in Chosen peoples
The Bible and British Maritime Empire
Gareth Atkins

One way of dealing with Isaiah’s Call to England is to pigeonhole it as a throwback to the chiliastic jeremiads that had proliferated between 1820 and 1840 and still littered the British religious publishing landscape. 6 While historicist premillennialists like Chamberlain continued to treat the apocalyptic books of the Bible and current events as mutually reinforcing interpretative keys, others were doubtful about the utility of this method. The ecclesiastical tattler W. J. Conybeare was one of them, his famous

in Chosen peoples
Joseph Hardwick

because they wanted ‘something respectable to build’. 47 Clearly different groups within the lay community wanted different things from the Church. Congregations were also composed of people who were from various ethnic backgrounds and who had brought different religious cultures with them when they emigrated. Meeting the spiritual demands of these varied communities was a challenge for bishops and clergy who

in An Anglican British World
Abstract only
Joseph Hardwick

Church’s different branches. The alternative was a colonial Church made up of self-governing, self-financing congregations, each free to choose their own ministers and make changes to Anglican doctrines and liturgy. Though the high church model of Church expansion left room for dioceses to exercise control over their own affairs, this would go hand in hand with moves to enforce discipline and uniformity

in An Anglican British World
Abstract only
The Church of England, migration and the British world
Joseph Hardwick

fold. 7 Indeed religious figures were among the first to recognise that there was such a thing as a ‘British world’: Charles Inglis, the Anglican bishop of Nova Scotia, referred to his inhabiting such a thing as early as 1812. 8 Recently, scholars working on the Church of England have explored the varying contributions that Anglican clerics made to the creation of ‘neo’ or ‘Better Britains’. Anglican

in An Anglican British World
Joseph Hardwick

incidence of individuals of non-British descent among Anglican congregations. 125 Prominent among the Cape Dutch who attended Anglican churches in Cape Town were the constitutional reformers J. H. Wicht, D. J. Cloete and F. S. Watermeyer: these men may have had religious reasons for attending Anglican services, but it is also significant that they were anglicised Afrikaners who called for representative

in An Anglican British World
Andrew J. May

Of the early life of Thomas Jones there is sparse documentary evidence, and nothing written in his own hand until August 1839 when he applied to the LMS to be sent overseas as a missionary. The question of what knowledge and practices Jones carried with him, both in terms of religious belief and practical know-how, is important in determining both the force

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Joseph Hardwick

of clergy. Training local candidates took time and bishops had to rely on whatever the SPG sent out to them. Broughton noted that there was a ‘vast variety of shades of opinion’ among his SPG recruits. 92 Bishops also had to keep in mind the religious opinions, prejudices and needs of their congregations. Had they not done this, bishops may well have been much more enthusiastic recruiters of

in An Anglican British World