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Life in a religious subculture after the Agreement

personal prayers and Bible readings. A congregation or extended religious network can come to feel like a family for some people, often replacing or structuring actual family life. Material culture The subculture also features what Ingersoll ( 2003 ) has called ‘material culture’ – objects and artefacts. This

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
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It is increasingly accepted that religion is a cause of many of the world’s violent conflicts. The vast majority of contemporary conflicts are intrastate conflicts and involve issues of religious, national or ethnic identity. Although religious conflicts in general have been less common in the post-Second World War era than nonreligious conflicts – or ethnonational

in Conflict to peace
"On the political passions in Europe and America and their implications for Transatlantic History"

originated as a discipline that developed out of the perception that European and American development has been intimately ‘entangled’, and that a fuller comprehension required study as a common story. The early-modern age of encounter and transplantation (religious, ethnic, institutional) and the later decades of revolution in Europe and the Americas, even later the growth of welfare states and economic systems, cried out for a narrative that encompassed events on both sides of the ocean. This impulse produced several streams of research. British and American historians

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered

of a raft of responses by key sectors in the Omagh community. This included the Christian churches and other faith communities, which were coordinated largely by the local Churches’ Forum. The Forum had already been in place prior to the bombing and this created a valuable set of established relationships across denominations. This was important given the way in which the religious structures in

in Conflict, peace and mental health
British relief in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870–71

overseeing the sewing of garments, employing poor women in London’s East End to do so. September saw an FWVRF appeal read out in austere Friends’ Meeting Houses up and down the country, and small congregations began to send in their donations to the central committee. At the larger Meetings, local committees were established to appeal for and collate donations from Friends and non

in Calculating compassion

, and where families could gather and be briefed by the police on what would take place. Next door was the viewing room, which had been carefully prepared in a short time with flowers and appropriate furniture to be as respectful and supportive as possible. Depending on the religious denomination of the family, religious artefacts were assembled in the room for each identification. Some families had

in Conflict, peace and mental health

’s religions. 8 It was, rather, that they could no longer hold up Christianity alone as a sufficient spur to moral action. In transferring the incentive from God to man, they preached a ‘Religion of Humanity’ which many in this period were drawn to profess. 9 The ‘Religion of Humanity’ was a broad church and its congregation differed not least in their approach to a

in Calculating compassion
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returns. If anything, Buddhist opinion had hardened during the Japanese Occupation. 20 In 1949 Firth urged his congregation in Mandalay to go out and convert Buddhist Burma, but the exhortation lacked any real bite. The offensive, when it came, was short on aggression and long on charm. 21 Daw Mya Tin, a Bible Woman, discussed religious issues with a Buddhist nun living on Kyaukse Hill, Daw Aye Zin taught Buddhist urchins in the Aung Daw Mu quarter of Mandalay, and Daw Ngwe Wint started a Sunday school for Buddhist children

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
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early colonial camp-followers. Of course they had come to convert ‘heathens’, not to seek fortunes or to wield power. They were swept along by religious enthusiasm, imperialistic patriotism and British military technology. Many a missionary ambition had been fired by stirring hymns in the old Methodist Hymn Book – hymns with imperialistic undertones that conflated patriotic duty with Christian devotion. The words conjured images of ‘alien lands afar’. They spun romantic yarns about heathens brandishing ‘reeking tube and

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
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scrutinised in the way marketing directors might examine sales graphs. Year-on-year figures revealed growth or decline, while global comparisons measured relative evangelical efficiency. The statistics were an indication of the numbers changing allegiance from one religion to another, not whether individuals had changed their ‘conduct or inner lives’. 4 Religious conversions caused bitter divisions within colonial communities. When converts entered new religions they opted out of old friendships. They inflicted pain on those

in Conflict, politics and proselytism