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E.A. Jones

Solitude, or at least some form of significant separation from the rest of society, carries symbolic power – often with religious connotations – in most, if not all, cultures. But the particular forms that solitariness and withdrawal take vary from culture to culture, and are sensitive to changes in place and time. 1 This book is concerned with the principal forms of solitary religious life in England between the

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550

The ruling officers of every medieval town invested the place with a religious identity, claiming on this basis the reverence of its subjects. 1 Devotion was recruited in this way to the service of ecclesiastical and political authority. The relics incorporated in the spire of St Paul’s cathedral in London epitomised the distinction and pre-eminence claimed by the bishop

in Towns in medieval England
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Bamberg has been found both in the content and in the literary style of the Annals . The keen interest shown by the author in events in Bamberg is characterised by detailed local knowledge. For example, writing of Bishop Herman’s foundation, the religious house of St James, Lampert noted that it ‘was situated in a much frequented place in the midst of streams of people … and separated from the cathedral

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld

Lotharingians, 190 at the instigation of a demon, took the monastic vows in Gorze. After a few days, however, when the demon that had deluded him had made its identity known, he abandoned the habit of the religious life, in which the angel of Satan had transformed himself into an angel of light , 191 and, like a deserter of God and a renegade, took back his wife 192 and his possessions

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld
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, Charlemagne became the sole king of the Franks. Intensive campaigns of military conquest extended his rule from Catalonia to Hungary, while he also inaugurated a programme of religious and intellectual reform that stressed the need for kings and their subjects to please the Christian God who had helped the Franks to triumph over their enemies. 5 The scale of Charlemagne

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga

This chapter contains the translated text ofDe divortio. It has several underlying sections, responding to the questions that Hincmar initially received. These sections were, however, further divided to make the twenty-three responses which appear in the manuscript. The original sections are as follows: the procedure at the councils of Aachen, rules on marriage, divorce and remarriage, the validity of ordeals, the next steps in Theutberga's case, the sodomy charge, Lothar's relationship with Waldrada and sorcery, Lothar's possibilities of remarriage, and the response of bishops towards appeals to them and the case of Engeltrude. De divortio also deals with seven further questions which Hincmar received six months after the first: who is able to judge the king, can the king avoid further judgement in the case, the case of Engeltrude, and the effects of communion with the king.

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga

congregation of monks was founded and built; they dwelled in unity 23 under the administration and dignity of three previous abbots. 24 But just as in ancient days, when the people, still ignorant, were living in small thatched huts 25 and there was not an ordered system of religious worship and service nor of social duties 26 so also in that time the condition of this place [i.e., Admont] did

in Noble Society

Cross and who wished to go with him or who gave him any of their goods. He also gave him the power to take with him, as soldiers, any religious, at the summons of their superiors. 11 This year the lords in parliament proposed to send an army to France; the bishop exhibited the papal bull and sought permission to execute it; the king did not wish to bestir himself; the commons

in The reign of Richard II

– never to have accepted the apostolic title . The year of the Lord 1101 . 37 Nine years after leaving his father’s palace the young King Conrad , 38 who in administering Italian matters had always relied upon the advice of Matilda ( that great , most noble and , as some say , religious woman who was related to him by

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest

sent his perfect spirit , 81 the spirit of counsel , 82 the spirit of peace, among the princes of both sides, when each army had already encamped a short distance from the other so that they could position their battle-lines to be directed against one another, there were sent from each side some of the most wise and religious nobles who began to negotiate with honour for fraternal concord. What

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest