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E.A. Jones

Solitude, or at least some form of significant separation from the rest of society, carries symbolic power – often with religious connotations – in most, if not all, cultures. But the particular forms that solitariness and withdrawal take vary from culture to culture, and are sensitive to changes in place and time. 1 This book is concerned with the principal forms of solitary religious life in England between the

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Gervase Rosser

The ruling officers of every medieval town invested the place with a religious identity, claiming on this basis the reverence of its subjects. 1 Devotion was recruited in this way to the service of ecclesiastical and political authority. The relics incorporated in the spire of St Paul’s cathedral in London epitomised the distinction and pre-eminence claimed by the bishop

in Towns in medieval England
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

the religious men of our age. But now I want to know how he came to live the life of a monk. Pascasius: It is true that worldly glory never comes without envy, [p. 23] nor prosperity without the risk of some adversity, but a virtuous man uses each in its turn for his salvation. When certain people attacked Arsenius with their plots, therefore, and he saw that in their shamelessness violent men held positions that they did not merit, he found that the time had arrived for what he had previously vowed to God in his mind. 62 For the clever occupied the seats of

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

Introduction Book Four opens with the election in 1116 of a successor for Abbot Theodoric. Here the chronicler offers a view of the perils of such moments of transition in the life of a religious community. The process of selecting a new superior could expose and exacerbate existing internal divisions and tensions, and could sometimes lead to bitter discontent and schism. Abbatial elections could also invite attempts, in this case by Bishop-elect Ulrich I, to pressure, influence, and increase control. The chronicler’s account of the process, and particularly

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
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Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

, 1142, 1143, 1146, and 1147, with each short entry beginning with a standard, “in the year of the Incarnation of the Lord…” This annual reporting was interrupted for comments on events of supra-regional importance; after the entry for 1147, for example, the chronicler added six chapters on the Second Crusade and Wendish Crusade, 2 including Bernard of Clairvaux’s visit to Constance to preach it, and the involvement of some of Petershausen’s own men who joined the crusade and had not yet returned. 3 Several chapters that describe the death of religious women and men

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
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Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

” monk from Hirsau, reinvigorates religious life at Petershausen, and enhances the monastery’s spiritual and social standing with numerous building projects and land acquisitions. The chronicler writes extensively about Theodoric’s expansion of the choir, 2 improvements to the monastic buildings, 3 construction of chapels dedicated to saints Mary and Michael and the apostle Andrew, 4 and the purchase of land for building and maintaining more monasteries. 5 It should be kept in mind that the chronicler had completed Book Three by 1136. He thus details a course of

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
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Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

, gardeners, carpenters, and the like. 11 In addition to serfs and menial servants, Gebhard also donated unfree knights and ministerials for the defense of the newly founded monastery. 12 Gebhard nevertheless prudently withheld some of his most powerful ministerials for fear that they would do more harm than good; while nominally owned by the monastery, the powerful ministerials who belonged to a religious community could pose a threat to monastic property. The liber traditionum of the Bavarian abbey of St. Emmeram in Regensburg, for example, records several conflicts

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
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I.S. Robinson

Bamberg has been found both in the content and in the literary style of the Annals . The keen interest shown by the author in events in Bamberg is characterised by detailed local knowledge. For example, writing of Bishop Herman’s foundation, the religious house of St James, Lampert noted that it ‘was situated in a much frequented place in the midst of streams of people … and separated from the cathedral

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld
I.S. Robinson

Lotharingians, 190 at the instigation of a demon, took the monastic vows in Gorze. After a few days, however, when the demon that had deluded him had made its identity known, he abandoned the habit of the religious life, in which the angel of Satan had transformed himself into an angel of light , 191 and, like a deserter of God and a renegade, took back his wife 192 and his possessions

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld
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Rachel Stone and Charles West

, Charlemagne became the sole king of the Franks. Intensive campaigns of military conquest extended his rule from Catalonia to Hungary, while he also inaugurated a programme of religious and intellectual reform that stressed the need for kings and their subjects to please the Christian God who had helped the Franks to triumph over their enemies. 5 The scale of Charlemagne

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga