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The abortive Northern Rebellion of 1663
Alan Marshall

, there had been a largely passive acceptance of the Commonwealth’s religious regime.30 Although pockets of Roman Catholicism were still seen as an ongoing issue in the Palatinate throughout the period, by the early 1660s it was to be nonconformity and the Baptist congregations, in particular, that were seen as the major threat. In Durham, as elsewhere in the country, religious dissent now tended to be associated with sedition, and the strength of the newly restored Church was soon used to impose some control on the area. The returning bishop, John Cosin, also held the

in From Republic to Restoration
Margret Fetzer

brought about by each congregation member’s individual conversion. As Donne himself puts it: ‘It hath alwaies beene the Lords way to glorifie himselfe in the conversion of Men, by the ministery of Men’ (VI, 10, 205). The traditional conclusion of each sermon – the word ‘Amen’ (from the Hebrew, meaning ‘So be it’/‘Truly’) – attests to the performative potential with which the sermon was believed to be endowed. The preacher was eager to exploit the sermon’s performative power, for example when he urges his listeners to dedicate themselves to Christ at the very moment of

in John Donne’s Performances
Amanda L. Capern

migration by writing and they lived in a globalising world of political tension that centred on religious debate. For example, Elizabeth Avery, who first wrote in the late 1640s, had been brought up in exile in the Netherlands in the two decades before war. She spent time in the Fifth Monarchist congregation of John Rogers inside the Protestant Pale in Dublin and her brother was a Congregationalist minister in Boston.87 The missionary travel of Quaker women also exemplifies the lived experience of women politicised by their times. Quaker Anne Gargill travelled to Portugal

in From Republic to Restoration
Margret Fetzer

3 Passionate performances – Poems erotic and divine for I Except you’enthrall mee, never shall be free, Nor ever chast, except you ravish mee. (‘Batter my heart’, ll. 12–14) Whereas Donne’s erotic poems are much indebted to religious metaphor, his nineteen ‘Holy Sonnets’ strongly rely on erotic imagery. After an analysis of Donne’s religiously erotic poems, these are now to be compared to his erotically religious poetry. As it engages in a histrionics of love making, Donne’s erotic poetry conceives of love as a matter of (artful) performance, hence subscribing

in John Donne’s Performances
Margret Fetzer

’s Performances scrutinised for traces of the writer’s precise religious allegiances – and this holds not only for straightforwardly religious works, like the sermons or Devotions, but also for his divine and erotic poems (Martz, 1954; Lewalski, 1979; DiPasquale, 1999). The present study is no exception. I, too, have shown a preference for some of Donne’s poems over others, and, although my approach strives for greater comprehensiveness by focusing not only on Donne’s Songs and Sonets but also on his divine poetry, as well as his sermons, letters and Devotions, one cannot

in John Donne’s Performances
Exceptional women of power
Carol Blessing

the work of Alexandra Walsham and Robert Healey. 2 This chapter will probe further the pairing of Elizabeth with Deborah the Judge, the Bible figure most often used to describe Elizabeth’s gynecocracy, to view the cultural constructs of the Hebrew woman who stood in both political and religious authority within Scriptures, and to link those constructions to the era’s representations of the English

in Goddesses and Queens
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From Republic to Restoration
Janet Clare

especially apparent in the regions. In his examination of the abortive ‘Northern Rebellion’ of 1663, Marshall illustrates the deep roots of nonconformity, particularly among Baptist congregations, in pockets of the North-​East and the resistance of nonconformists to persecution by the established Church of Durham and Yorkshire. The years of civil war and republican experiment had led to a ferment of political and religious ideas articulated in an expanded public sphere of popular print culture, lay preaching, widening participation in sectarian debate and, consequently

in From Republic to Restoration
The Authorized Version and the Book of Common Prayer at the Restoration
David Bagchi

more fateful one which took place at the Restoration, and which had a not dissimilar outcome. The Bible translation commissioned by King James VI and I was not universally acclaimed in its early years; but it was one aspect of religious life in England which remained largely unscathed by the upheavals of the Civil War and the Interregnum. More than that, by 1661 it had achieved such widespread acceptance across all religious factions that both Independents and the heirs of Laudian Anglo-​Catholicism demanded its official restoration. Having seen off its only real

in From Republic to Restoration
Margret Fetzer

-Navarro, 2003; Doerksen, 2004: 165; Strier, 1996: 107). The speaker’s devout reaction implicitly confirms the bells’ usefulness, for ‘We cannot, wee cannot, O my God, take in too many helps for religious duties’ (Devotions 84). Earlier on, the speaker valued the bells even as highly as the sermon: ‘And this continuing of ringing after his entring, is to bring him to mee in the application. Where I lie, I could heare the Psalme, and did joine with the Congregation in it; but I could not heare the Sermon, and these latter bells are a repetition Sermon to mee’ (Devotions 84

in John Donne’s Performances
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Reframing drama, 1649– 65
Janet Clare

be hanged, drawn and quartered. The play mockingly alludes to Harrison’s promise on the scaffold –​recorded by Pepys, who witnessed the execution –​that he would return to judge them that judged him.48 Cutter promises to declare his prophetic vision to the ‘Congregation of the Lovely in Coleman-​street’ (III.xii) and Tabitha similarly urges him to pronounce ‘before the Congregation of the Spotless in Coleman-​Street’ (IV.v). Coleman Street was the hub of London’s religious radicalism, particularly Quakerism and the Fifth Monarchism of Harrison, as well as Cowley

in From Republic to Restoration