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Epistemology and Revolution in Charles Brockden Brown‘s Wieland

In Wieland, Charles Brockden Brown attempted to negotiate varying forces confronting contemporary American religious and political life. Through the transformation of the temple into a Gothic zone Brown injects questions of epistemological uncertainty, clashing forces of rational Enlightenment and supernatural faith. Brown outlines the religiously motivated founding of the nation reacting to European oppression as allegorical to the Wieland patriarchs journey from the Old to New World, and his construction of the temple demonstrates the establishment of new institutions in the American landscape. Religious liberty turns into extremism, producing Gothic violence that transforms the temple into a site of horror and destruction. His children attempt to re-transform the temple along rational Enlightenment lines much the same as Brown perceived the need for America to distance itself from its revolutionary and religious extremist origins. Yet the failure of rationalism to expunge the supernatural aura from the temple allows for the tragic events to transpire that comprise the bulk of the novel. Ultimately, Brown‘s Gothic novel evinces the critical nature of the epistemological clash he sees taking place for the direction America will take, and his concerns that Gothic violence will reverberate throughout future generations find their expression in Wieland‘s temple.

Gothic Studies
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‘of cult-like and occult undertaking’

This Introduction by John Whatley to ‘Gothic Cults and Gothic Cultures 2: Historical Gothic’, his second issue as guest editor of Gothic Studies, begins with a brief summary of some of the conclusions found in Gothic Studies 4/2, and goes on to explain how the seven new articles in 5/1 explore the relations between Gothic cults and cultures in their historical dimensions. The articles illustrate how threats posed by conspiratorial groups of the Gothic past were responsible for the infiltration of the spectral and uncanny into everyday life, so the fear of dangerous ideas and conspiracies figures in the apparitions and phantoms of Gothic culture. To help contextualise the articles, this Introduction outlines the shapes and origins of cults in the Gothic texts of the past, for example in religious sects and robber bands. A summary of each article then follows.

Gothic Studies
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Condamné), described by Bresson himself in conversation as the film of grace par excellence, whose subtitle Le Vent souffle où il veut (‘The wind bloweth where it listeth’) distils the spirit of Jansenism. If two of Bresson’s first three feature films – Les Anges du péché and Journal – take the religious life as their setting, that life, like the God that is its ostensible inspiration

in Robert Bresson
Resistance and revolution

punished. However, to them, eternal life (as opposed to the “second death” of the sinners) is not simply a reward one might receive after the Judgment: it must also be obtained here on earth, and man must fight for it—both on an earthly and celestial level. Even within the purely apocalyptic level, man still has to fight in order to help fulfill the prophecy. This religious belief, which refutes the existence of hell and heaven, is also explained by non-religious reasons, linked to the history of Christianity and to the interpretation of power relations. According to the

in Time and memory in reggae music
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Horace Smith’s Mesmerism

and embitter life’ ( 1846 : 141). This strange but sanguine novel makes the case for a radical transvaluation of death and it draws on Gothic elements to effect this. As Smith acknowledges, ‘we contemplate the descent into the grave with aversion, if not with horror’ ( 1846 : 141), a horror often distended and warped in Gothic scenarios, and it is this that Smith is determined

in The Gothic and death

In 1947, Bresson went to Rome to work on a screenplay of the life of St Ignatius Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, which was never to be filmed. This renewal of his interest in the religious life bore fruit in Journal d’un curé de campagne of 1951, adapted from the celebrated novel by Georges Bernanos. Almost entirely faithful to the novel, Bresson’s film is nevertheless radically different from it

in Robert Bresson

the islands) that might motivate and legitimate a desire of returning to nature and the foundation of rural communities in the hills, the concept of nature must also be linked to the notion of lost paradise, which has a strong religious dimension. Within a messianist and millenarian problematic, Rastafari indeed   The Rastafari way of life obeys two essential exigencies: to live in harmony with nature by maintaining the balance of creation, and to live outside of Babylon. Called Ital (“natural”) this way of life is based on the essential notions of purity and

in Time and memory in reggae music
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This book discusses Catherine Breillat's films in thematic groupings. It examines Breillat's relation to some of the most important women in her life, including her mother, her sister, and fellow director Christine Pascal, whom she considered to be a kind of second sister. It explains the impact of a gender-conservative family environment and a strict religious upbringing, and then the countervailing influence of the Women's Liberation Movement on Breillat when she moved from the provinces to Paris. The discussion of Breillat's films connects them to feminist writings as well as to male gender studies. The book also explores the extraordinarily varied cultural context of Breillat's work, including the literature, films, paintings, photos and pop music that have influenced her films. Special attention is devoted to discussion of the complex relation between Breillat's films and patriarchal pornography. The book first considers her three female coming-of-age films including Une vraie jeune fille, 36 fillette and A ma soeur!, with Sex is Comedy, a movie about the making of A ma soeur!. Then, the book examines Breillat's three movies about masculinity in crisis, including Sale comme un ange (with a look at its early avatar, Police), Parfait amour! and Breve traversee. The book also examines Tapage nocturne, Romance and Anatomie de l'enfer, the three films that Breillat has made about the sexual odysseys of adult women. Finally, the book looks at Breillat's relation to and influence on other contemporary directors before turning to a discussion of her latest film, Une vieille maitresse.

Catholicism and devotion in The Smiths

I also experienced the realities of life.22 When asked whether he had in fact any religious beliefs, he replied: I do, but not quite as dramatic as I should have by that absurd Catholic upbringing. I could never make the connection between Christian and Catholic. I always imagined that Christ would look down upon the Catholic Church and totally disassociate himself from it. I went to severe schools, working class schools, where they would almost chop your fingers off for your own good, and if you missed church on Sunday and went to school on a Monday and they

in Why pamper life's complexities?
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representation of the future itself provokes the emergence of sociopolitical commitment, which possesses strong revolutionary tendencies: the two dimensions, religious and political, of the representation of the future are dynamically imbricated, and this imbrication rebounds back onto the present time, onto the present of the earthly near future, onto the present of daily life. Hence to the three solid arrows in Figure 13.4, has to be added a fourth arrow that shoots back from the future into the present. In other words, in Weberian terms, there is an inner

in Time and memory in reggae music