Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

worldview – where the suffering of strangers is a matter of concern, and a legitimate ground for principled intervention, for everyone – that humanitarianism and human rights enjoy full legitimacy. They are both morally grounded by the same ends, ends that have thrived under US-led liberal order for four decades (reaching their zenith from 1991 to 2011). During this time, both humanitarianism and human rights have provided a seemingly non-political (or perhaps ‘political’ not ‘Political’) outlet for religious and secular activists, many from the left

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
José Luís Fiori

Introduction This strategy is guided by principled realism. It is realist because it acknowledges the central role of power in international politics, affirms that sovereign states are the best hope for a peaceful world, and clearly defines our national interests… We are also realistic and understand that the American way of life cannot be imposed upon others, nor is it the inevitable culmination of progress . The White House, ‘National Security Strategy of the United States of America’ ( The White House, 2017 ) The White House published the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

engagement. However, our comparative approach also illustrates how, across the three countries, social life, communal trust and political legitimacy worked around, through and in conflict with formal and informal community engagement interventions and local leadership structures. The narratives we present below reveal the restricted range of options for humanitarian NGOs and state representatives in encounters, which can have significant consequences both for communities and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

. Globalisation has uprooted people symbolically as well as materially. A growing ‘impulse’ for social protection has received little response from the receding welfare state. 3 In the absence of an economic resolution, the assertion of cultural sovereignty has become a fuite en arrière – a retreat, to nostalgic fantasies of grandeur, fascistic tropes of national belonging and religious fundamentalisms. 4 Ressentiment has given rise to diverse anti-modern social phenomena, from ISIS to the Tea Party to the Hindu nationalist movement associated with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles
Rony Brauman

, far from being a timeless good, are not immune to prevailing stereotypes or political power relationships. As a treaty aimed at an emblematic nineteenth-century battle was being signed, the conflicts and massacres of civil wars and imperial conquests were foreshadowing the twentieth century’s mechanised and industrialised total wars. Dunant himself anticipated the evolution of armed conflict towards total war in a collection of writings published at the end of his life, presciently

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

many Christian traditions. For example, a number of eminent Anglican theologians 53 argued that research on the early embryo is acceptable and raised no conflict within Christian doctrine. Other Anglicans remained adamantly opposed to any form of destructive research on embryos. 54 Nonetheless the adherent of any religious faith enjoys a framework of belief. The sanctity of life has meaning for them because that life was given by God. The sanctity of life in a secular society 3.11 Many still subscribe to some form of belief in a divinity or higher

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

four and a half and suffering from T-cell leukaemia. His parents agreed to intensive chemotherapy. Doctors argued that transfusion of blood products was essential to maximise the prospects of successful treatment and saving S’s life. Without resort to blood, the chances of successful treatment were significantly reduced. His parents objected not just on religious grounds. They raised concerns about the safety of blood products. Their lawyers argued that S’s relationship with his family might suffer, for his parents would believe that his life had been prolonged by an

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Abstract only
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

19.1 Society has never been comfortable with issues surrounding the process of dying; and as healthcare staff are involved with the dying, they inevitably become involved in ethical as well as medical dilemmas. 1 For the last few years the heat of the debate has focused on when the law should permit some sort of assistance for those who help a terminally ill relative or friend end her life, in particular when families have travelled with a relative to the Dignitas clinic in Switzerland where assisted dying is not unlawful. But this is just one of a host of

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Leslie C. Green

, and the two may be in use at the same time. But it may not debase or devalue the former currency so as to injure the economic life of the occupied territory or enhance its own at that territory’s expense. The local economy may be required to bear only the expense of the occupation, and only to the extent that this can be reasonably expected of it. 21 Problems may arise, as happened in Bosnia, after the

in The contemporary law of armed conflict