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core beliefs of the Christian faith – God, life after death, heaven, hell and sin – and a significant proportion within both religions attend church services on a regular basis. Even by the late 1990s and contrary to the expectations of secularization theorists, not only was Northern Ireland still a deeply religious society but it had remained exceptionally religious by European standards. 9 As Fahey et al. ( 2006 : 54–55) put

in Conflict to peace
The impact of devolution and cross-border cooperation

This book examines how the conflict affects people's daily behaviour in reinforcing sectarian or ghettoised notions and norms. It also examines whether and to what extent everyday life became normalised in the decade after the 1998 Good Friday Agreement (GFA). Cross-border commerce has been the stuff of everyday life ever since the partition of Ireland back in 1921. The book outlines how sectarianism and segregation are sustained and extended through the routine and mundane decisions that people make in their everyday lives. It explores the role of integrated education in breaking down residual sectarianism in Northern Ireland. The book examines the potential of the non-statutory Shared Education Programme (SEP) for fostering greater and more meaningful contact between pupils across the ethno-religious divide. It then focuses on women's involvement or women's marginalisation in society and politics. In considering women's political participation post-devolution, mention should be made of activities in the women's sector which created momentum for women's participation prior to the GFA. The book deals with the roles of those outside formal politics who engage in peace-making and everyday politics. It explores the fate of the Northern Irish Civic Forum and the role of section 75 of the 1998 Northern Ireland Act in creating more inclusive policy-making. Finally, the book explains how cross-border trade, shopping and economic development more generally, also employment and access to health services, affect how people navigate ethno-national differences; and how people cope with and seek to move beyond working-class isolation and social segregation.

Life in a religious subculture after the Agreement

While most commentators agree that the conflict in and about Northern Ireland was not primarily a religious one, it has been argued that the violence kept religiosity inflated. Because it helped to structure community life and informed people’s ethnic identities, religion was considered an ‘ethnic marker’, a resource people used to mark out and

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
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This was published as a guest editorial in Anthropology Today , 29: 4, August 2013. An authoritative review of Akbar Ahmed’s The Thistle and the Drone was published by Malise Ruthven (Ruthven 2013b ). This book seems to me the finest of Akbar Ahmed’s many publications, blending a literary and religious sensibility with political and historical analysis, a

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times

. They also provide meals to very poor villages for religious festival days. Islamic Relief’s foothold in the north then enabled it to start a programme in the far more densely populated south of Mali, and to set up a national head office in the capital, Bamako. 3 The main aim of my visit to Rharous last March was to investigate whether an Islamic charity has special advantages when

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
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Life and Times Surveys, 1998–2010 There are also important differences between the two religious communities in relation to this issue. While Protestant and Catholic preferences in terms of their support for religiously mixed schools were broadly similar throughout most of the period of study, since 2008 Catholic support for religiously mixed schools has declined

in Conflict to peace
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mainstream interpretations of Ascham’s works, which have argued for the significance of Hobbesian arguments in structuring the Engagement debates under the Republic, or have pointed out the secular and/or religious quintessence of his thought, this book highlights the complicated mixture of political languages which was used in propaganda for the Parliament and the Commonwealth. By locating the political

in Order and conflict
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relatives, including relatives by marriage? About how many are the same religious as you?’ and ‘What about your neighbours? About how many are the same religion as you?’ Source : Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey, 2010 These high levels of segregation hold for both communities and, to a lesser extent, for those with no

in Conflict to peace
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Death and security – the only two certainties

In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes. (Benjamin Franklin quoted in Meister 1952 : 163) Life and death in security This Book reworks the proverb of Benjamin Franklin, quoted above, so that it reads, ‘in this world

in Death and security

engaged to do in 1649, along with the influential and former Presbyterian MP Rous, was to negotiate the consensus of his former Presbyterian allies by presenting the new government as committed to the achievement of religious reformation. What kind of religious reformation was still the object of discussion both within and outside the Parliament, especially over the issue of the liberty to be granted to

in Order and conflict