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which Britain divested itself of an Empire. 1 Yet the broader role of domestic religious life in shaping the public's engagement with decolonisation – reaching from the top of the institutional hierarchy to the local parish church, and including affiliated organisations and campaigns – remains shadowy and under-defined. This neglect is surprising given the important role that religion and, in particular, missionaries are seen to have played in the formation, expansion, and justification of the British Empire. Missionary involvement focused

in British civic society at the end of empire
Decolonisation, Globalisation, and International Responsibility

This book is about the impact of decolonisation on British society in the 1960s. It moves away from the traditional focus on cultural, media, and governmental archives to analyse public agency and civic forms of engagement with the declining empire. Through a close examination of middle-class associational life it broadens our understanding of who had a stake in decolonisation while also revealing the optimism and enthusiasm with which members of the British public developed visions for a post-imperial global role. By studying a wide range of associational organisations this book shows that globalisation and decolonisation opened up new opportunities for international engagement for middle-aged members of middle-class society. In the 1960s for many participants in associational life it became a civic duty to engage, understand, and intervene to help the shrinking world in which they lived. This book uncovers how associations and organisations acted on this sense of duty, developing projects that promoted friendship and hospitality as the foundations of world peace, visions for secular and religious forms of humanitarianism that encouraged relationships of both sympathy and solidarity with those in the global South, and plans to increase international understanding through educative activities. This book will be useful to scholars of modern British history, particularly those with interests in empire, internationalism, and civil society. The book is also designed to be accessible to undergraduates studying these areas.

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life Empires are networked spaces. Flows of people, ideas, and goods have shaped not only the development of the imperial project overseas but also the experiences of those who remained in domestic Britain. 39 Personal, familial, business, and religious networks did not disappear with decolonisation. 40 A central concern of this book is to determine how the organisations and associations of civil society functioned as conduits for the flow of information and ideas between local, national, imperial and global spaces. How did individuals and

in British civic society at the end of empire
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The scattered Irish

applies to the main protagonists in this book, middle-class public servants. The thousands of Irishmen who served in the ranks of the British army in India lived very different lives. 7 It is generally accepted that emigrant Irish brought their political and religious baggage with them to Australia and other British Dominions, affecting the political and cultural life of those

in Servants of the empire
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chivalric ideal and the burden of kingship it ends with a haunting diminution into silence. Here distilled in this remarkable work we find the quasi-religious mysticism which remained even when his Catholic faith faltered, that nostalgia for the past which led him to produce in later life so much music related to childhood and above all that never-failing commitment to chivalry by which he judged mankind and

in Imperialism and music
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Great white hope of the Edwardian imperial romancers

honours – but free from religious fanaticism, alcoholic over-indulgence and rash pronouncements – Lawrence possessed all the attributes likely to attract the attention of literary, ideological and artistic imperialists. Even before Thomas put his name in lights, Kipling took Lawrence under his wing. They met at a London dinner party shortly before Lawrence went to the Versailles Peace Conference in

in Imperium of the soul

and civic ideal. 24 Advocate of the League of Nations Willoughby Dickinson wrote that nations would gradually draw together and ‘by cooperating constantly for the good of all they will develop a new internationalist spirit’. 25 Beyond the state, associational, religious, and humanitarian groups also began to discuss the best means to restore and preserve harmony. This was, Arsan, Lewis, and Richard argue, ‘a period of unprecedented popular enthusiasm for transnational associational life, in which various competing calls to global affinity … jostled and clamoured

in British civic society at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Looking beyond the state

. The present volume should be regarded not as an end point but as a starting point from which to think outside the boxes of state and non-state actors. It offers an academic springboard from which to move away from the compartmentalisations to which colonial historical debate is prone: black and white, elites and non-elites, heroes and villains, each operating in neatly delineated secular or religious

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940

delegate duties to his missionary colleague, Stanley Smith, and his evangelical work. 45 Having been reported to have compelled patients at the government-owned Kabale Hospital buildings to attend religious services, for example, Sharp noted that: ‘I am using these buildings as though they were Missions premises and … regular services have been started for the patients … In this connection I must mention

in Beyond the state

’ Union, the Women's Voluntary Service for Civil Defence and the Women's Gas Federation. 20 This long list of Rotherham associations illustrates how Freedom from Hunger was able to mobilise and draw on pre-existing networks of associational life. It also suggests that many of those who contributed to the campaign did so not as individuals but as part of a group, reinforcing ideas of collective civic responsibility. The broad base of support that Freedom from Hunger attracted is not just indicative of the widespread influence of

in British civic society at the end of empire