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which Britain divested itself of an Empire. 1 Yet the broader role of domestic religious life in shaping the public's engagement with decolonisation – reaching from the top of the institutional hierarchy to the local parish church, and including affiliated organisations and campaigns – remains shadowy and under-defined. This neglect is surprising given the important role that religion and, in particular, missionaries are seen to have played in the formation, expansion, and justification of the British Empire. Missionary involvement focused

in British civic society at the end of empire
Decolonisation, Globalisation, and International Responsibility

This book is about the impact of decolonisation on British society in the 1960s. It moves away from the traditional focus on cultural, media, and governmental archives to analyse public agency and civic forms of engagement with the declining empire. Through a close examination of middle-class associational life it broadens our understanding of who had a stake in decolonisation while also revealing the optimism and enthusiasm with which members of the British public developed visions for a post-imperial global role. By studying a wide range of associational organisations this book shows that globalisation and decolonisation opened up new opportunities for international engagement for middle-aged members of middle-class society. In the 1960s for many participants in associational life it became a civic duty to engage, understand, and intervene to help the shrinking world in which they lived. This book uncovers how associations and organisations acted on this sense of duty, developing projects that promoted friendship and hospitality as the foundations of world peace, visions for secular and religious forms of humanitarianism that encouraged relationships of both sympathy and solidarity with those in the global South, and plans to increase international understanding through educative activities. This book will be useful to scholars of modern British history, particularly those with interests in empire, internationalism, and civil society. The book is also designed to be accessible to undergraduates studying these areas.

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life Empires are networked spaces. Flows of people, ideas, and goods have shaped not only the development of the imperial project overseas but also the experiences of those who remained in domestic Britain. 39 Personal, familial, business, and religious networks did not disappear with decolonisation. 40 A central concern of this book is to determine how the organisations and associations of civil society functioned as conduits for the flow of information and ideas between local, national, imperial and global spaces. How did individuals and

in British civic society at the end of empire

, showing that consular administration was a mixture of the adaptation of local institutions, Indian organisational influences and consular frameworks. Immigration, emigration and the meeting of different ethnic and religious people characterised life in Xinjiang, and this community shaped the administration of British justice. The policies of registration revealed that these communities were drawn almost entirely from the Indian subcontinent. However, identifying British subjects was complicated by the absence of documentation and because many of those claiming Indian

in Law across imperial borders
Thomas Nast and the colonisation of the American West

Before the period usually identified as ‘imperial’ in the history of the United States, the nation engaged in a colonial exercise in the Plains and Mountain West. There, the US imposed its cultural, economic, and religious standards on disparate peoples. Scholars have, in their exploration of the ways that the West represents an imperial project, and in their efforts to link American western expansion to the lives and histories of native people, addressed a variety of elements of imperial thought to connect settlement, property, culture, and

in Comic empires

. It should be noted that the history of prints in China follows a completely different pattern from that of Europe. Traditional Chinese uses of print included copying of religious text and imagery, illustrating books for elite audiences, and producing pictures for popular consumption, especially New Year Prints ( nianhua ) invoking prosperity. 2 Such images would adorn the walls of common households for an entire year and would be replaced during festivals. Before the advent of the political poster in the 1920s

in Comic empires

and civic ideal. 24 Advocate of the League of Nations Willoughby Dickinson wrote that nations would gradually draw together and ‘by cooperating constantly for the good of all they will develop a new internationalist spirit’. 25 Beyond the state, associational, religious, and humanitarian groups also began to discuss the best means to restore and preserve harmony. This was, Arsan, Lewis, and Richard argue, ‘a period of unprecedented popular enthusiasm for transnational associational life, in which various competing calls to global affinity … jostled and clamoured

in British civic society at the end of empire
Sarukhan’s al-Masri Effendi cartoons in the first half of the 1930s

images, metaphors and alternative, different or new models of life. 21 This ‘small group of thoughtful people’ becomes engaged in the business of thinking, generating or providing alternative or unprecedented new options for society. 22 Such semiotic products, or ‘life images’, serve the purpose of reinforcing sociocultural control by promoting preferred interpretations of life circumstances. Even-Zohar – following Russian semioticians such as Yuri Lotman, Boris

in Comic empires
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Portraits of the monarch in colonial ritual

’. 19 Passing beneath these arches mounted with images of Wilhelmina, the governor-general may well have perceived more acutely than usual that he was the queen's ‘underking’. Celebrations for the Dutch monarchy were great occasions for governors-general. Both official palaces on Java – one on the Koningsplein at Rijswijk in Batavia, the other at the hill station in Buitenzorg to the south of the capital – held life-sized, painted state portraits of the queen on permanent display. The portrait at Buitenzorg hung in the

in Photographic subjects
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Photographic encounters between Dutch and Indonesian royals

exhibitions of gifts from Indies kings and princes functioned as spectacular displays of magisterial authority, rather than princely power of the kind represented in curiosity cabinets or mercantile wealth flaunted in still life paintings. In the modern Netherlands, public showings of precious diplomatic gifts from its colonies gave novel form and meaning to older visual discourses of Dutch power. An example of the Dutch monarchy's role in promoting these connections occurred in early 1937, soon after the wedding of Crown Princess Juliana. The pusaka

in Photographic subjects