Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 33 items for :

  • social archaeology x
  • Manchester Medieval Sources x
Clear All
E.A. Jones

Introduction We do not have much information about the size and design of anchorholds or reclusories: the documents rarely give details, and standing remains or archaeological evidence are both rare and rarely straightforward to interpret. 2 Though a priest-anchorite could, in theory, be spiritually self-sufficient, cells were almost invariably attached to a larger religious establishment, where

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

(ii) The anchorite’s cell: detail (i) from Walter H. Godfrey, ‘Church of St. Anne, Lewes: An anchorite’s cell and other discoveries’, Sussex Archaeological Collections 69 (1928): 159–69, p. 160. (ii) from Godfrey, ‘Church of St. Anne, Lewes’, p. 164. Reproduced by permission of the Sussex

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

[ 42 ], where Sir John Dale was priest, whilst the goods and furniture were in the custody of John Shenton, hermit, and his wife. (For married hermits, see [ 51 ], [ 52c ].) But not every hermit dwelt in a chapel, 3 and some were probably itinerant. As this already begins to suggest, hermits of this period were typically men of no great social standing or spiritual aspiration. 4 Most would have been engaged in what

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

Introduction Solitaries dwelt on the margins of the religious establishment. Their liminal status was the source of much of their cultural power. Their position outside the structures of temporal society made them a valuable reference point for ordinary Christians, whilst giving them a vantage point from which to turn a disinterested eye on the social and religious structure and, where necessary, to

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only

transmit practices of considerably greater antiquity. There were many discontinuities in the history of later medieval towns, whose distribution, forms and functions were altered by changing demographic and social circumstances. None the less, the student of towns in this later period should be aware of their past. The extent of Anglo-Saxon urbanisation has been a revelation of recent archaeology

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only

of the local economy (the butchering and leather trades are prominent) and of the wide diversity of material resources and social status amongst the townspeople. D. Cromarty and R. Cromarty (eds), The Wealth of Shrewsbury in the Early Fourteenth Century: Six Local Subsidy Rolls 1297 to 1322 , Shropshire Archaeological and Historical Society, 1993, pp. 118–22. Latin, transl. by the

in Towns in medieval England

their enslavement to material gain [ 47 ]. Individual cases of personal business success and social advancement can be identified at all times across the period. It is harder to be certain whether the conditions of life for the generality of the late medieval urban population were improving or otherwise. When the owners of urban estates thought it worthwhile to build new rows of shops, it is evident that

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only

As the sources in Section VII make clear, the diversity and economic hierarchy of the medieval town created a social environment in which there could be no natural community. These very conditions, however, go far to explain the deliberate creation, by townspeople themselves, of hundreds of voluntary associations. More diverse, flexible and indeed voluntary than the professional

in Towns in medieval England

However, notwithstanding such accommodation to social realities, there is in the moral legislation of towns prior to the Protestant Reformation an evident desire, not merely for tighter policing of unruly social elements but for spiritual reform in the godly commonwealth [ 113 ]. Yet late medieval religious culture was too multivalent to be manipulated in the sole interest of

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only

urban life reaching back well before 1066. As is noted in the Introduction, archaeology has recently filled out the written record of Anglo-Saxon boroughs, to show that central and southern England were significantly urbanised well before the Norman invasion. The Domesday Book is not a simple source for the historian to use [ 9 ], [ 10 ]. It was drawn up not to provide a rounded description of

in Towns in medieval England