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Michael Winterbottom is the most prolific and the most audacious of British filmmakers in the last twenty years. His television career began in the cutting-rooms at Thames Television, and his first directing experience was on the Thames TV documentaries, Ingmar Bergman: The Magic Lantern and Ingmar Bergman: The Director, made in 1988. Winterbottom has featured in top ten lists in Britain and his name has become a moniker of distinction in the promotion of his own films. This book articulates the ideas which have led to the name 'Michael Winterbottom' being associated with a particular body of work and, second, by turning to those factors which tend to dissipate the idea of Winterbottom as the single source of a world view and style, and to relocate his films within a constellation of directors, films and (principally European) national cinemas. It is important to acknowledge that all of his films employ realism across a variety of styles, genres and historical representations. The book focuses on Welcome to Sarajevo, Wonderland, In This World and The Road to Guantánamo, with a brief reference to 24 Hour Party People as five very different films that have particular relationships with the historical world that they represent. It considers what Winterbottom has done with such popular genres as the road movie, the musical and the sciencefiction thriller, how far he has adapted their conventions to contemporary film practice and ideology, and whether these films, in reworking Hollywood genres, exhibit any peculiarly British inflections.

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Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

concentrate on the two superlative performances at the heart of the film, which ensure that it reworks the road movie genre to unusually passionate effect. 24 Hour Party People ‘We thought it would be fun to have a lot of music but to avoid people bursting into song’, said producer Andrew Eaton. Both he and Winterbottom wanted ‘to make a film with great music that wasn’t specifically a

in Michael Winterbottom
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Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

filmmaking, in particular the New Waves of France and Germany in the 1960s and 1970s. It is important to acknowledge that all of his films employ realism across a variety of styles, genres and historical representations. In this chapter we will focus on Welcome to Sarajevo , Wonderland , In This World and The Road to Guantánamo , with a brief reference to 24 Hour Party People (discussed at greater length in chapter 5 ) as

in Michael Winterbottom
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Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

2 Gina McKee as Nadia in the city at night, Wonderland (1999) 3 Steve Coogan as Mancunian mover and shaker, Tony Wilson, in 24 Hour Party People (2002

in Michael Winterbottom
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Winterbottom and a body of work
Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

Winterbottom brought with him from the first Cracker episode editor Trevor Waite who was to edit the next nine Revolution productions including Family , Go Now , Butterfly Kiss , Wonderland (1999), The Claim and 24 Hour Party People . Waite was an experienced editor having worked on Rumpole of the Bailey (1978–92), Inspector Morse (1993) and Cracker (1993). On many of these films Waite was assisted by Peter Christelis

in Michael Winterbottom
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Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

/Steve Coogan’s soundtrack attempt to ‘place’ the events that make up 24 Hour Party People , and the final long shot that reveals Mariane and her son walking in a Paris street, and lifts to lose them in the crowd, reminds one of the last moments of Jude and The Claim : in these and other ways, the Winterbottom signature is all over A Mighty Heart . In other ways, it is also a step forward, a change of

in Michael Winterbottom
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Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

work, ‘His years in television engendered some of the most important collaborative relationships that came to dominate his working ethos’. 5 These include screenwriter Frank Cottrell Boyce, who wrote Forget About Me and would later write Winterbottom’s first feature, Butterfly Kiss (1995), and several other ambitious films, including The Claim (2001) and 24 Hour Party People (2002); Trevor

in Michael Winterbottom
Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

many directors on this list, Winterbottom is dauntlessly prolific. Also, dauntingly versatile. He moves with consummate ease from literary adaptation ( Jude , 1996) to pop-culture follies ( 24 Hour Party People , 2002) and excoriating social drama ( In This World , 2002), and then back to the Eng Lit canon with his cunningly postmodern take on Tristram Shandy ( A Cock and Bull

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Winterbottom and the English novel
Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

in the inevitable spaces between bursts of filming, there is plenty of time for personnel to stand about chatting desultorily of other things – which, of course, is what Sterne’s characters spend most of their time doing. At one point there is a television interviewer (Tony Wilson) talking to his old friend Coogan (who played him in 24 Hour Party People ) about the filming, while the real cinematographer films the fictional

in Michael Winterbottom
Youth, pop and the rise of Madchester
Author: Steve Redhead

Madchester may have been born at the Haçienda in the summer of 1988, but the city had been in creative ferment for almost a decade prior to the rise of Acid House. The End-of-the-Century Party is the definitive account of a generational shift in popular music and youth culture, what it meant and what it led to. First published right after the Second Summer of Love, it tells the story of the transition from New Pop to the Political Pop of the mid-1980s and its deviant offspring, Post-Political Pop. Resisting contemporary proclamations about the end of youth culture and the rise of a new, right-leaning conformism, the book draws on interviews with DJs, record company bosses, musicians, producers and fans to outline a clear transition in pop thinking, a move from an obsession with style, packaging and synthetic sounds to content, socially conscious lyrics and a new authenticity.

This edition is framed by a prologue by Tara Brabazon, which asks how we can reclaim the spirit, energy and authenticity of Madchester for a post-youth, post-pop generation. It is illustrated with iconic photographs by Kevin Cummins.