Search results

The Chronicle of Regino of Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg
Author: Simon MacLean

The career, mental world and writings of Regino, abbot of Prüm, were all defined by the Carolingian empire and, more particularly, by its end. The high Ottonian period of the mid-tenth century also witnessed a revival of historiography, exemplified by the work of the two major authors who wrote about the rise of the dynasty. The first of these was Liutprand of Cremona, whose Antapodosis, a history of European politics from 888 until around 950, and Historia Ottonis, a focused account of events surrounding Otto's imperial coronation, were both written in the earlier 960s. The second was Adalbert, who most probably wrote his continuation to the Chronicle in 967/968. Regino's Chronicle, dedicated to Bishop Adalbero of Augsburg in the year 908, was the last work of its kind for several decades, and as such its author can be regarded as the last great historian of the Carolingian Empire. The Chronicle is divided into two books. The first, subtitled 'On the times of the Lord's incarnation', begins with the incarnation of Christ and proceeds as far as the death of Charles Martel in 741. The second 'On the deeds of the kings of the Franks' takes the story from the death of Charles Martel through to 906. The much shorter continuation by Adalbert of Magdeburg enjoys a place in the canon of works relating to the history of the earliest German Reich and consequently has received considerably more attention.

Simon MacLean

This chapter contains the translated and annotated text of Adalbert of Magdeburg's Continuation.

in History and politics in late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe
Charles the Bald, Lothar I and the Vikings
Simon Coupland

, 2 (1883), p. 79. 49 Regino of Prüm, Chronicon 882, ed. F. Kurze, MGH, SRG (Hanover: Hahn, 1890), p. 118, trans. S. MacLean, History and politics in late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe. The Chronicle of Regino of Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009), p. 185. 50

in Early medieval militarisation
Abstract only
Jonathan R. Lyon

Adalbert of Magdeburg ; and Warfare and politics in medieval Germany, ca. 1000: on the variety of our times by Alpert of Metz . 13 The annals of Lampert of Hersfeld ; Chronicles of the Investiture Contest ; Eleventh-Century Germany: the Swabian chronicles ; and for Bohemia in this

in Noble Society
Regino of Prüm and royal monastic conversion
Erik Goosmann and Rob Meens

Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg (Manchester/New York 2009). On the significance of 908, the year in which Louis turned fifteen, see MacLean, History and Politics, p. 18. 2 S. Airlie, ‘ “Sad stories of the death of kings”: narrative patterns and structures of authority in Regino of Prüm’s Chronicle’, in E. Tyler and R. Balzaretti (eds), Narrative and History in the Early Medieval West (Turnhout, 2006), 105–31, p. 126. See also R. Meens, ‘The rise and fall of the Carolingians. Regino of Prüm and his conception of the Carolingian empire’, in L. Jégou, S. Joye, T

in Religious Franks
Margaret J. McCarthy

Politics in Late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe: the Chronicle of Regino of Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg , Manchester, 2009, p.  180): ‘Eo [adulescentes filios Ludowici] quod iussu Caroli eorum genitrix spreta atque repudiata fuerit’; K.  F. Werner, ‘Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen bis um das Jahr 1000 (1.–8. Generation)’, in W. Braunfels, ed., Karl der Grosse: Lebenswerk und Nachleben . Band IV: Das Nachleben (Düsseldorf, 1965), pp.  403–79 at 440. 12 K. Heidecker, The Divorce of Lothar II: Christian Marriage and Political Power in the

in Hincmar of Rheims
Abstract only
Simon MacLean

partly defined by its shared historical knowledge. His work is as eloquent a testimony to that elite’s common cultural assumptions as is his career to the political conflicts that divided it. Adalbert of Magdeburg One important reason for the comparative lack of scholarly interest in Regino’s Chronicle is that there are no modern Lotharingians to claim it as their own. By

in History and politics in late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe
Abstract only
Ottonian Germany
T. J. H McCarthy

, trans. P. Squatriti (Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press, 2007). MacLean, S. (ed.), History and Politics in Late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe: The Chronicle of Regino of Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009). MacLean, S., Ottonian Queenship (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017). Mayr-Harting, H., Church and Cosmos in Early Ottonian Germany: The View from Cologne (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008). Mayr-Harting, H., Ottonian Book Illumination: An Historical

in Debating medieval Europe
Abstract only
Transformations around the year 1000
Paul Fouracre

Ottonian Europe: The Chronicle of Regino of Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009). Reuter, T., ‘Debate: the “Feudal Revolution”: III’, Past and Present 155 (1997), 177–95. Reuter, T. (ed.). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Vol. 3: c. 900–c. 1024 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999). Reynolds, S., Fiefs and Vassals: The Medieval Evidence Reinterpreted (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994). Reynolds, S., Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe, 900–1300 (Oxford: Clarendon

in Debating medieval Europe
Abstract only
Matthew Kempshall

, Letters, Ep.IV.22, pp. 147–9, only a position of great power removed a historian from either suppressing the truth or inventing a lie (vel supprimere verum vel concinnare mendacium) and, whilst it is shameful to utter falsehoods, it is dangerous to tell the truth (turpiter falsa periculose vera dicuntur); cf. Regino of Prüm, Chronicle, trans. S. MacLean, History and Politics in Late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe: The Chronicle of Regino of Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg (Manchester, 2009), I pref., pp. 61–2 (see also page 446). Writing in the 1050s, William of

in Rhetoric and the writing of history, 400 –1500