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The question of land in Ireland has long been at the heart of political, social and cultural debates. In eleven essays a group of authors including some of the most influential historians and social scientists of modern Ireland, and up-and-coming scholars, explore Ireland's land questions in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which presents the current state of our understanding of the issue of land in Ireland in two survey essays that cover the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The book's second section presents a series of reflections in which historians and social scientists look back on how they have approached the topic of land in Ireland in their earlier writings. A third section presents some innovative new research on various aspects of the Irish land question.

Gerard Moran

This chapter considers the political career of one of the Land War's pivotal figures, Matthew Harris. Harris was one of the Fenians leaders who felt that an agrarian agitation could be made into a powerful revolutionary weapon outside of parliament, and that lay beyond the control of the constitutional politicians. Much effort is given to showing how the establishment of the Ballinasloe Tenants’ Defence Association in May 1876 helped to consolidate the alliance between the Fenians and small farmers that became a critical foundation of the early Land League. The opposition Harris encountered, for class and political reasons, is explored. The chapter also reflects on how revealing biography can be in the study of popular agrarian movements.

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Fergus Campbell

a short period as each benefitted in different ways from the agitation. In other words, Clark and Bew found that there were significant divisions and tensions in rural Irish society and 01_Fergus_Introduction.indd xviii 8/1/2013 9:14:19 PM MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/01/2013, SPi INTRODUCTION AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS XIX that – broadly speaking – Irish nationalist and agrarian movements from the late nineteenth century onwards were riven by internal conflicts. David Jones took this discussion even further by exploring for the first time the economic

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Abstract only
James G. Patterson

dramatic increase in the level of physical violence utilized by the post-1798 agrarian movements. Moreover, the long-term presence of radical emissaries in the region, combined with the heightened anticipation of a French invasion, lent Introduction 11 ominous political undertones to these traditional acts. Ultimately, I hope to do for the early 1800s what Smyth and Curtin did for the 1790s – to view politicization and political action in as broad a context as possible, beyond formal organizations. Notes 1 For the Volunteer Movement, see P. D. H. Smyth, ‘The

in In the wake of the great rebellion
Eric Richards

, as witnessed in many parts of the British Isles, there was a revolutionary rise in agricultural productivity. This was connected with the continuous migration of people off the land, usually labourers and peasantries and their offspring. These original agrarian movements were integral and essential to the activation of modern economic growth and urbanisation. At the same time there was fundamental demographic expansion – a massive, unprecedented growth of numbers far in excess of rural labour needs. The much more efficient new agriculture in the modernising economy

in The genesis of international mass migration
Fergus Campbell

condescending to the ordinary people of rural Ireland and clearly partial towards the British state.To my mind, there were certainly sections of Irish nationalist and agrarian movements in the past that had committed horrendous acts, but those movements had also campaigned for the economic well-being and political rights of the ordinary people, and this was rarely acknowledged in the discussions I had with revisionist historians or in some of the key revisionist books published in the 1970s and 1980s. I was also concerned that prominent revisionists appeared to believe that

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Easter 1916 and the advent of post-Catholic Ireland
Matthew Schultz

words, the gender politics that guide depictions of the Easter Rising in At Swim, Two Boys and A Star Called Henry summon the spirit of nationalist revolution to present-day Ireland, only to undermine the specter of Catholic nationalism’s oppressive reality. Notes 1 In David Lloyd’s, ‘Regarding Ireland in a Postcolonial Frame,’ in Ireland After History. Critical Conditions: Field Day Essays and Monographs 9. Ed. Seamus Deane. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1999, p. 37, he observes ‘That [Social] movements – agrarian movements, women’s movements

in Haunted historiographies
Abstract only
James G. Patterson

evident in the anti-tithe campaign of the winter of 1798–1799 compares quite unfavourably with that of its most recent antecedent, the widespread Rightboy movement of the 1780s. The Rightboys, who similarly focused much of their attention on the issue of tithes, were responsible for as few as four deaths during the six years they were active in County Cork between 1785 and 1791.40 What then explains the willingness of post-1798 agrarian movements in south Munster to utilize extreme physical violence? As illustrated above, the post-1798 agrarian secret societies in south

in In the wake of the great rebellion