Search results

Abstract only
Cinema, documentary, and the visual arts

Regarding the real: cinema, documentary, and the visual arts develops an approach to the study of documentary film focussing on its aesthetic and cultural relations to the modern visual arts, especially: animation, assemblage, photography, painting, and architecture. In particular, it examines how documentary practices have often incorporated methods and expressive techniques derived from these art forms. Combining close analysis with cultural history, the book re-assesses the influence of the modern visual arts in subverting the structures of realism typically associated with documentary film, and considers the work of figures whose preferred film language is associative, and fragmentary, and for whom the documentary remains an open form, an unstable expressive phenomenon that at its best interrogates its own narratives, and intentions. In the course of its discussion, the book charts a path that leads from Len Lye to Hiroshi Teshigahara, and includes along the way figures such as Joseph Cornell, Johan van der Keuken, William Klein, Jean-Luc Godard, Jonas Mekas, Raymond Depardon.

Abstract only
Horror and the avant-garde in the cinema of Ken Jacobs

words, cinema enacts animal sacrifice to perpetuate the life of the image. Indeed, all film is horror film. American avant-garde filmmakers from Maya Deren to Harry Smith have followed this spectral path, illuminated by magic lanterns, Phantasmagoria spectacles and the magic of Georges Méliès. For Stan Brakhage, light, or lumen , held the status of a supernatural force. The

in Monstrous adaptations
Abstract only
A reading of Charles Olson’s ‘The Lordly and Isolate Satyrs’

familiar and dangerous, harbingers of emergent powers (the dead, the Fathers) that Olson must take account of personally and as a watchman for society at large. In its first publication, ‘The Lordly and Isolate Satyrs’ itself acted as a harbinger of Olson’s pivotal role in postwar American avant-garde poetry, leading off the fourth issue of Evergreen Review. By virtue of the journal’s fame and wide circulation and the prominence of the poem in this issue, it was, in Ralph Maud’s words, ‘Olson’s most conspicuous publication to that date’ (SL, 273).13 A pioneering literary

in Contemporary Olson
Abstract only
Soviet montage and the American cinematic avant-garde

3 Kino in America: Soviet montage and the American cinematic avant-garde Alongside the radical Constructivism of the New Playwrights Theatre, the American avant-garde’s most sympathetic engagement with Soviet revolutionary culture was in cinema. If the innovations of Vsevolod Meyerhold’s Constructivist theatre stimulated the NPT, then the development of cinematic montage by his protégé Sergei Eisenstein, alongside Lev Kuleshov, Dziga Vertov, Vsevolod Pudovkin, and Alexander Dovzhenko, had an analogous impact upon American avant-garde cinema. The Soviet film

in Watching the red dawn
The American avant-garde and the Soviet Union

Watching the red dawn charts the responses of the American avant-garde to the cultural works of its Soviet counterpart in period from the formation of the USSR in 1922 to recognition of this new communist nation by USA in 1933. In this period American artists, writers, and designers looked at the emerging Soviet Union with fascination, as they observed this epochal experiment in communism develop out of the chaos of the Russian Revolution and Civil War. They organised exhibitions of Soviet art and culture, reported on visits to Russia in books and articles, and produced works that were inspired by post-revolutionary culture. One of the most important innovations of Soviet culture was to collapse boundaries between disciplines, as part of a general aim to bring art into everyday life. Correspondingly, this book takes an interdisciplinary approach by looking at American avant-garde responses to Soviet culture across several media, including architecture, theatre, film, photography, and literature. As such, Watching the red dawn considers the putative area of ‘American Constructivism’ by examining the interconnected ways in which Constructivist works were influential upon American practices.

Abstract only
The red Atlantic

Introduction: the red Atlantic This book concerns the cultural responses of the American avant-garde to the Soviet Union during the period from the foundation of the USSR to its recognition by Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s government in 1933. The Americans in this study who watched the ‘Red Dawn’ were variously artists, architects, designers, writers, curators, collectors, critics, and journalists, all of whom were fascinated by the epic transformations of revolutionary Russia and enthused by the possibilities for new forms of art that would match this epochal

in Watching the red dawn
Abstract only
The multiple faces of Chantal Akerman

with the most original of creative writing. In interviews, she deliberately avoids aligning herself with any cinematic tradition or movement, but has nonetheless given some clues to her preferences in terms of film style. As we will see, she is deeply indebted to the American avant-garde of the 1970s, but she also mentions fellow European directors Eric Rohmer, Jean Eustache and Rainer Werner Fassbinder alongside Godard as

in Chantal Akerman
Abstract only

into account within the aesthetics of the sublime, one had to wait for a much later resurgence of Burke’s ideas. In his 1948 essay ‘The Sublime is Now’, Barnett Newman explained how he and fellow American avant-​garde artists were defining a sublime that was finally free both from ‘the absolutisms of perfect creations’ and from standards of sublimity that, being external to artistic creation, could not be reached. By focusing on pure expression, free from any external standards, he and his fellow artists were finally breaking the bonds with constraining notions of

in The challenge of the sublime
Abstract only
Red train journeys

examine the accounts of American avant-garde members who travelled to the Soviet Union during the first Five Year Plan, looking specifically at the poets E. E. Cummings and Langston Hughes. The responses of Cummings and Hughes were almost exactly opposite to one another: the former’s horror equalled the latter’s praise. Yet both figures were enmeshed within the pages of Literature of the World Revolution, the communist organ of the International Union of Revolutionary Writers, which was from 1932 called International Literature, in ways that betray the complex cultural

in Watching the red dawn
Abstract only
Anatomy of an avant-garde

work, it needs to be aligned, on the one hand, with the counter-culture of the 1960s and 70s, which vigorously attacked oppressive structures of power and domination and explored new forms of identity, sexuality and desire, and, on the other hand, with the avant-garde practices in film, the theatre and the visual arts that gave artistic form to these interrogations. Directly influenced by the American avant-garde which she

in Chantal Akerman