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Author: Bill Marshall

This is a full-length monograph about one of France's most important contemporary filmmakers, perhaps best known in the English-speaking world for his award-winning Les Roseaux sauvages/Wild Reeds of 1994. It locates André Téchiné within historical and cultural contexts that include the Algerian War, May 1968 and contemporary globalisation, and the influence of Roland Barthes, Bertolt Brecht, Ingmar Bergman, William Faulkner and the cinematic French New Wave. The originality of his sixteen feature films lies in his subtle exploration of sexuality and national identity as he challenges expectations in his depictions of gay relations, the North African dimensions of contemporary French culture and the centre–periphery relationship between Paris, especially his native southwest and the rest of France. The book also looks at the collaborative nature of Téchiné's filmmaking, including his work with Catherine Deneuve, who has made more films with him than with any other director, and the role of Philippe Sarde's musical scores.

Abstract only
Bill Marshall

café, as the story of the two main – and indeed all – the film’s protagonists will unfurl in relation to arrivals and departures, and especially the aspirations to other places and other lives announced by Hélène’s point of view shot on to the railway tracks. (Hotel corridors and the airport will also fulfil this function.) Téchiné’s take on Biarritz is thus rather different from other cinematic representations, the most notable of 32 andré téchiné which is Eric Rohmer’s Le Rayon vert (1986), which, although shot almost like a home movie, emphasised the town’s sunlit

in André Téchiné
Bill Marshall

/Deneuve’s film. The mode of melodrama is here very close to the ‘woman’s film’ à la Cukor, in which the narrative is about problems confronting women in relation to sexuality and society. 68 andré téchiné Deneuve’s first scene is when Thomas returns home after the first meeting with Martin. In fact she and the house, along with the teacher-priest who is expressing his concerns to her about the boy, are first observed by Thomas as he returns from the first meeting with Martin and from his grandparents’ where his first communion is being prepared, and where in an argument Thomas

in André Téchiné
Abstract only
Bill Marshall

1 Emergence André Téchiné’s sixteen feature films to date include a range of low- and high-budget productions, some involving major stars of the French cinema, some a cast of (at least at the time) unknowns, some highly successful in terms of the box office (1.1 million domestic entries for Ma Saison préférée/My Favourite Season in 1993 remains the highest), some far less so. The biggest critical success was arguably Les Roseaux sauvages/Wild Reeds (1994), which won the César (the equivalent of the Oscar in the French film industry) for best film of its year

in André Téchiné
Bill Marshall

: Jones 1997: 166. 98 andré téchiné this allows him a distinctive and ambivalent take on his native southwest. The emphasis in the films on movement dovetails with specific journeys, journeys moreover that are meaning-creating experiences. In his study of the origins of modern nationalism, Benedict Anderson has argued for the centrality of the journey in the creation of shared collective identities, in the religious pilgrimage, and then in the secular administrative apparatuses of absolutising monarchies in Europe (Anderson 1983: 55–57). In the abstract space of

in André Téchiné
Abstract only
Bill Marshall

and Cécile and Natan’s home. The city is filmed as in constant transformation: a mechanical digger is working even in sight of the family house. Combining the versatility and lightness of the digital camera used in Loin with the visual advantages of 35mm, a hand- or shoulderheld camera was used to accentuate the film’s sense of mobility, its opening out of the protagonists’ inner, mental and emotional lives. 134 andré téchiné For Téchiné, this amounted to filming a psychological ‘art’ movie like an action film: ‘J’ai choisi de filmer cette histoire comme un film d

in André Téchiné
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Deneuve–Téchiné
Bill Marshall

at least one major film every year since turning 50 in 1993, often starring in several works in the same season 4 in a career which has encompassed, and continues to encompass, work with leading French auteurs (François Ozon, André Téchiné, Philippe Garrel, Léos Carax), mainstream box-office successes (Gabriel Aghion’s Belle Maman and Absolument fabuleux, for example), and a series of films with iconic world

in From perversion to purity
Open Access (free)
Theoretical debates and the critical erasure of Beckett’s cinema
Matthijs Engelberts

-André Fieschi and André Téchiné comment upon the films shown that year and (briefly) discuss the short film shot in New York. ‘Beckett is a scribbler who never goes to the cinema’ (‘Beckett est un littérateur qui ne va jamais au cinéma’),5 is the programmatic opening sentence of these few lines, which were amongst the first to be written on Film following its release. The dense text which follows this first sentence is not especially easy to grasp, not least because the authors, who clearly possess a very good knowledge of Beckett’s oeuvre, embark upon a rapid comparison of

in Beckett and nothing
Deneuve as heritage icon
Sue Harris

C atherine Deneuve has made five films with André Téchiné, more than with any other director she has worked with in her long career: Hôtel des Amériques (1981), Le Lieu du crime/Scene of the Crime (1986), Ma saison préférée/My Favourite Season (1993), Les Voleurs/Thieves (1996) and Les Temps qui changent (2004). (Jacques Demy, another filmmaker of movement in social and mental worlds, is

in From perversion to purity
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Autobiography and the imaginary self
Michael Leonard

Akerman and Jacques Doillon (both of whom appear in preparatory sketches in Elle a passé tant d’heures discussed above), in addition to Benoît Jacquot, André Téchiné, Werner Schroeter and Leos Carax. Belying the ostensible simplicity, Les Ministères de l’art emerges as a dynamic film-essay that incorporates reflection on Garrel’s personal life and a polemic on the production conditions in France for a type of cinema motivated by personal expression rather than mass-market exploitation. The film begins with a detour from its supposed subject. It opens with a

in Philippe Garrel