Marie Mulvey-Roberts

80 The arts of Angela Carter 4 Angela Carter’s poetry Sarah Gamble A ngela Carter was an assiduous fashioner of her own autobiographical narrative, which became ever more stylized and repetitive as the years went by. Twenty-five years after her death, her own life-account has not been substantially challenged: following the script that she herself set out, we talk of Carter the novelist, the short story writer and the cultural commenter; Carter as feminist, socialist and demythologizer. Not until recently, however, has she also been identified as a poet

in The arts of Angela Carter
A cabinet of curiosities

This book aims to give new insights into the multifarious worlds of Angela Carter and to re-assess her impact and importance for the twenty-first century. It brings together leading Carter scholars with some emerging academics, in a new approach to her work, which focuses on the diversity of her interests and versatility across different fields. Even where chapters are devoted specifically to her fiction, they tend to concentrate on inter-disciplinary crossings-over as in, for example, psychogeography or translational poetics. This collection is a response to the momentum arising from commemorative events to mark the twenty-fifth anniversary since her death, including the first art exhibition inspired by her life and work. The arts of Angela Carter builds on existing scholarship and makes new interventions in regard to her inter-disciplinarity. The arrangement of the material, indicated by the chapter headings, draws attention to a variety of areas not normally associated with dominant perceptions of Angela Carter. These encompass fashion, art, poetry, music, performance and translation, which will be discussed in a number of historical, literary and cultural contexts. The book will also explore her interests in anthropology and psycho-analysis and engage in current debates relating to gender, feminism and postmodernism.

From Baudelaire to Black Venus
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

98 The arts of Angela Carter 5 Angela Carter’s objets trouvés in translation: from Baudelaire to Black Venus Martine Hennard Dutheil de la Rochère Translating someone else’s writing can be a way of easing oneself back into one’s poetry, using the other writer’s work as a point of inspiration. (Bassnett, 2011: 166) A n enthusiastic, if slightly baffled, review of The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman aka The War of Dreams (1972), published 14 August 1974 in Kirkus Reviews, stresses the translated character of Angela Carter’s surrealist

in The arts of Angela Carter
Religion, misogyny, myth and the cult
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

Angela Carter’s ‘rigorous system of disbelief ’ 145 7 Angela Carter’s ‘rigorous system of disbelief ’: religion, misogyny, myth and the cult Marie Mulvey-Roberts I n response to Lorna Sage’s question in a 1977 interview as to whether ‘one needs still to be anti-God’, Angela Carter was in no doubt, saying, ‘Oh yes! It’s like being a feminist, you have to keep the flag flying. Atheism is a very rigorous system of disbelief, and one should keep proclaiming it. One ought not to be furtive about it’ (Sage 1977: 57). Carter debunked religion through two short

in The arts of Angela Carter
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

Intermedial synergy in Angela Carter’s short fiction 17 1 Intermedial synergy in Angela Carter’s short fiction Michelle Ryan-Sautour We travel along the thread of narrative like high-wire artistes. That is our life. (Carter, 1992: 2) I n the introduction to Angela Carter’s The Curious Room: Collected Dramatic Works, Susannah Clapp speaks of a startling array of images discovered in Carter’s study following her death: ‘Drawings and paintings spilled out of these drawers’ (Clapp, 1997: ix). For Clapp these elements are more than anecdotal; they open up new

in The arts of Angela Carter
Abstract only
The play’s the thing
Robert Duggan

Chapter 2 Angela Carter: the play’s the thing A universal cast of two-headed dogs, dwarfs, alligator men, bearded ladies and giants in leopard-skin loin cloths reveal their singularities in the sideshows and, wherever they come from, they share the sullen glamour of deformity, an internationality which acknowledges no geographic boundaries. Here, the grotesque is the order of the day. (‘The Loves of Lady Purple’ in Burning Your Boats, 1996, 42, first published in Fireworks 1974) The invocation of the grotesque as the order of things is memorably marked in this

in The grotesque in contemporary British fiction
Abstract only
Angela Carter’s curious rooms
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

Introduction: Angela Carter’s curious rooms 1 Introduction: Angela Carter’s curious rooms Marie Mulvey-Roberts There’s a theory, one I find persuasive, that the quest for knowledge is, at bottom, the search for the answer to the question: ‘Where was I before I was born?’ In the beginning was … what? Perhaps, in the beginning, there was a curious room, a room like this one, crammed with wonders; and now the room and all it contains are forbidden you, although it was made just for you, had been prepared for you since time began, and you will spend all

in The arts of Angela Carter
Performance and puppet theatre in Angela Carter’s Japan
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

204 The arts of Angela Carter Performance and puppet theatre in Angela Carter’s Japan 10 The ‘art of faking’: performance and puppet theatre in Angela Carter’s Japan Helen Snaith O n 26 March 1969 Angela Carter received the news that she had been awarded the five hundred pound Somerset Maugham Travel Award for her novel, Several Perceptions, published in the previous year. Carter used the money to travel to America with her thenhusband, Paul Carter, before embarking upon her sojourn to Japan alone. Reflecting on Carter’s time abroad Sarah Gamble remarks

in The arts of Angela Carter
Angela Carter’s marionette theatre
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

246 The arts of Angela Carter 12 The rough and the holy: Angela Carter’s marionette theatre Maggie Tonkin L ‘ “ ive” theatre – though it might be better to call it “undead” theatre – used to embarrass me so much I could hardly bear it, that dreadful spectacle of painted loons in the middle distance making fools of themselves’ (Carter, 2013: 495): these scathing remarks, made in ‘Acting it Up on the Small Screen’, an essay published in New Society in 1979, reveal much about Angela Carter’s view of classic British theatre. Her characterization of classic

in The arts of Angela Carter
Angela Carter’s re-writing women’s fatal scripts from Poe and Lovecraft
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

Desire, disgust and dead women 183 9 Desire, disgust and dead women: Angela Carter’s re-writing women’s fatal scripts from Poe and Lovecraft Gina Wisker A ngela Carter’s writing is crucial to the rebirth of Gothic horror in the late twentieth century, and an impetus to read, or re-read, myth, fairy tale and the work of Edgar Allan Poe and H.P. Lovecraft – each significant, acknowledged influences. Carter’s work deconstructs the consistently replayed, cautionary narrative of myth and fairy tale in which (mainly young) women are first represented as objects

in The arts of Angela Carter