This book introduces the reader to emerging research in the broad field of 'imperial migration' and shows how this 'new' migration scholarship had developed our understanding of the British World. This is done through an analysis of some of former colonies of British Empire such as Australia, Canada, India and Zambia. The book focuses on the ideas of Reverend Thomas Malthus of how population movements presaged forces within sectors of a pre-industrial economy. The formation of national and imperial identities along racial lines in the mid-nineteenth century is covered by an analysis of the mid-nineteenth century British censuses. The clergy played a pivotal role in the importation and diffusion of a sense of British identity (and morality) to Australian churchgoers. The resistance and accommodation of Welsh Presbyterianism in Eastern Bengal is investigated through the varieties of engagement with Indian Christians and non-Christians. The book argues that Asian migration and the perceived threat it posed to the settler colonies was an issue which could unite these seemingly incongruent elements of the British World. Child migration has become a very sensitive and politically charged issue, and the book examines one of the lesser studied child migration agencies, the Middlemore Children's Emigration Homes. The book also deals with the cultural cross-currents in the construction of an Anglo-Canadian or 'Britannic' national identity. The white settlers' decisions to stay on after independence was granted to Zambia are instructive as it fills an important gap in our understanding of Africa's colonial legacy.

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the IODE in historical context, revealing its substantial contribution in the making of an Anglo-Canadian identity in the image of Britain. At a first glance the IODE appears as one of the many women’s philanthropic organizations that emerged from the second part of the nineteenth century onwards. With an increase in the status given to what was deemed women’s ‘natural’ work of

in Female imperialism and national identity
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The IODE has played a key role in the making of Anglo-Canada in the image of Britain, and has been an important part of British imperial and Canadian national history. Due to gender-blind frameworks, however, historians have paid little attention to the IODE. Today, at a time when the countries are focusing on national, rather than imperial, histories, the IODE is mistakenly

in Female imperialism and national identity

outpourings of Anglo-Canadian patriotism that she sensed around her. Her intentions were to seek an opportunity to strengthen Canadian national ties as well as imperial connections, her imperialist outlook stemming, in part, from her upbringing in Scotland. Murray had ambitious plans to form an empire-wide Federation of Daughters of the British Empire and Children of the Empire. She would start the organization in

in Female imperialism and national identity
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Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour

the interests of the tour organizers. My correspondence with the women who were on the tour as girls attempts to move beyond the propaganda; but, as with all of the interview-based material in this book, information recalled through lifetimes of experiences is influenced by the present, and must be treated as such. Significantly, the tour captures a 1928 moment in the narrative of hegemonic Anglo-Canada

in Female imperialism and national identity
Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45

loaded gun and saying go kill anyone you want to. You don’t have to have a reason, and I don’t think it’s right. 16 The ‘indoctrination’ referred to was the narrative of Anglo-Canada that the IODE actively promoted through education. In the 1930s education that emphasized strong attachments to the British Empire provided a precursor to

in Female imperialism and national identity
The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire

Through a study of the British Empire's largest women's patriotic organisation, formed in 1900 and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws light on women's involvement in imperialism; on the history of ‘conservative’ women's organisations; on women's interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender and imperial history, and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE's history through the twentieth century. Chapters focus upon the IODE's attempts to create a British Canada through its maternal feminist work in education, health, welfare and citizenship. In addition, the book reflects on the IODE's responses to threats to Anglo-Canadian hegemony posed by immigration, World Wars and Communism, and examines the complex relationship between imperial loyalty and settler nationalism. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

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British emigration and the construction of Anglo-Canadian privilege

Over the course of several months in 1924, immigration officials along with representatives of the Canadian National Railway (CNR) endeavoured to bring closure to yet another nasty little public relations incident relating to the reception of British emigrants in Canada. Margaret Boyle, an upstanding member of British Columbia’s Anglo-Canadian community, had stumbled on information

in Empire, migration and identity in the British world
War memorials, memory and imperial knowledge

myths of mainstream Anglo-Canadian identity. Nor was the construction of memory limited to visual representations. Books were purchased as part of the educational memorial, and the IODE intended to provide every school in Canada attended by children of foreign-born citizens with a full set of the ‘Daughters of the Empire Historical Library’, in the conviction that the foreign-born, unless

in Female imperialism and national identity
The canadianizing 1920s

. From disappointment to articulating Anglo-Canadian identity For all of the efforts to encourage British immigration during the 1920s, it was a time of disappointment for those concerned. The demand for domestic servants and agriculturalists consistently exceeded supply. 42 Marilyn Barber found that, ‘because Canadian-born women preferred employment in factories or in the

in Female imperialism and national identity