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Úna Newell

1 The Anglo-Irish Treaty and the June pact election The treaty In January 1922, a visiting correspondent for the London Times wrote: I have talked with many inhabitants of Galway, and they all look to a revival of the industries of the city – jute mills, flour mills and other industries – which aforetime promised a reign of prosperity for the West of Ireland. The vision is bright with promise, and it is not surprising that most of the people of the county desire to see the establishment of peace and the opportunity for development.1 Yet the approval of the

in The west must wait
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County Galway and the Irish Free State 1922–32
Author:

This book focuses on the historical debate beyond the Irish revolution and introduces a new study of post-revolutionary experience in Ireland at a county level. It begins to build an image of regional political and social life in the immediate post-revolutionary period. The book discusses the turbulent years of 1922 and 1923, the local electorate's endorsement of the Anglo-Irish Treaty and the beginning of domestic Irish politics in what was a vastly altered post-treaty world. The Anglo-Irish Treaty was signed in London and confirmed dominion status on a twenty-six-county Irish Free State. The book further examines four major themes in rural agrarian society: land, poverty, Irish language, and law and order. It establishes the level of deprivation in local society that the Cumann na nGaedheal government had to confront. Finally, the book attempts to relate the political record of the county to the existing socio-economic realities of local life. Particular emphasis is placed on the election campaigns, the issues involved, and the voting patterns and trends that emerged in Galway. In east Galway agrarian agitation shaped the nature of civil war violence. The civil war fanned a recrudescence in acute agrarian agitation in the west. In the aftermath of the civil war, the August 1923 general election was fought on the Free State government's terms.

More a disease than a profession
Editor:

This book illuminates the history of Irish journalism and enhances the idea of journalism as a scholarly exercise rooted in the historical evolution of the profession. The most curious episodes in the history of Irish journalism was the world-wide fame attained by the Skibbereen Eagle, a small provincial newspaper which declared that it was keeping an eye on the Tsar of Russia. William Howard Russell is probably the best known of the Irish-born correspondents who captured dramatic events from far-flung locations for newspaper readers. The book then examines the careers of four prominent Irish or Irish-American journalists, editors and newspaper proprietors based in Chicago, who struggled to tread the fine line between assimilation and identity. The four Chicago journalists previously mentioned are listed here: Melville E. Stone, John F. Finerty, Margaret Sullivan and Finley Peter Dunne. The book further focuses on Sinn Fein and its influence in altering the vision for Ireland's future. It considers the role of Irish newspapers in the peace process which ended the Irish War of Independence and led to the Anglo-Irish Treaty in December 1921. The book concentrates on the three most popular Irish daily newspapers at the time, the Freeman's Journal, Irish Independent and The Irish Times. Finally, the book explores the work of Irish journalists abroad and shows how the great political debates about Ireland's place in the United Kingdom served as a backdrop to newspaper publication in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

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Úna Newell

–west economic variance, and a divided political society, the Galway experience raises important questions concerning our understanding of the achievements and disappointments of the first decade of Irish independence. The establishment of the new state brought new expectations and new frustrations when these were not met. The first part of the book discusses the turbulent years of 1922 and 1923, the local electorate’s endorsement of the Anglo-Irish Treaty and the beginning of domestic Irish politics in what was a vastly altered post-treaty world. Part II examines four major

in The west must wait
Jason Knirck

. The debates over the controversial Anglo-Irish Treaty magnified the difficulty that Sinn Féin had in accepting opposition. The structures were in place to allow for a division of opinion on the Treaty: the cabinet and Dáil voted freely and rules of debate were followed, after a fashion. Although the Dáil was a one-party body, most of its members were professed democrats and few wanted to ban outright

in Democracy and dissent in the Irish Free State
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Irish journalists and the 1920–21 peace process
Ian Kenneally

16 Truce to Treaty: Irish journalists and the 1920–21 peace process Ian Kenneally This chapter considers the role of Irish newspapers in the peace process which ended the War of Independence and led to the Anglo-Irish Treaty in December 1921.1 With the exception of Michael Hopkinson’s The Irish War of Independence very little attention has focussed upon the peace process that got underway in the summer of 1920 and continued in a haphazard manner until the signing of the Treaty.2 While there has been increasing attention on the history and political impact of

in Irish journalism before independence
Marnie Hay

Dundalk. Barney Mellows recommended that all Fianna members who transferred to the IRA should ‘be placed in the same company or squad … as boys and men fight better when they know their partners’. 102 The Truce period The Truce beginning on 11 July 1921 suspended open hostilities between the IRA and British government forces and paved the way for the negotiation of the Anglo-Irish Treaty. Figures contained in the Military Service Pensions Collection (MSPC) indicate that the Fianna had at least 4,437 members on the date

in Na Fianna Éireann and the Irish Revolution, 1909–23
Fergus Campbell

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/01/2013, SPi 7 Fergus Campbell: Land and Revolution revisited The book Land and Revolution examines the development of the land question, and its relationship to the evolution of nationalist politics, in Ireland between the fall of Parnell in 1891 and the signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty in 1921.1 The book tells the story of nationalist politics and radical agrarian activity in the west of Ireland largely through a detailed case study of east Galway between the early 1890s and 1921. Although other case studies are introduced from

in Land questions in modern Ireland
Jason Knirck

Once the Anglo-Irish Treaty was passed, the pro-Treatyites had to set up a functioning democratic state. In this, they were influenced by a variety of competing factors. They valued multiparty democracy, but also were used to a politics that worked through a single party speaking for an allegedly monolithic nation. They also valued the creation of a Gaelic state: a new Irish way of organising a state and a society that broke with British models in crucial ways. In particular, they wanted to set up a state that avoided the conflicts inherent in the British two-party system. Throughout 1922, there were attempts to set up a democratic state but also repeated calls for a politics that minimised conflict. Throughout the year, politicians debated the founding principles of the new state, from theories of representation to the characteristics of an ideal representative.

in Democracy and dissent in the Irish Free State
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Laura Cahillane

contribution that the Constitution has made to our current legal and political system. Although many readers will already be familiar with this period in Irish history, for those who may be unaware of the events which led to the drafting of the 1 Drafting the Irish Free State Constitution 1922 Irish Free State Constitution, the following contextual information may be useful.1 The creation of the Irish Free State Constitution was made possible only following the signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty on 6 December 1921 by Irish and British representatives.2 This Treaty was the

in Drafting the Irish Free State Constitution