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Author: Daniel Birkholz

This study brings emergent methodologies of literary geography to bear upon the unique contents—or more to the point, the moving, artful, frequently audacious contents—of a codex known as London, British Library MS Harley 2253. The Harley manuscript was produced in provincial Herefordshire, in England’s Welsh Marches, by a scribe whose literary generation was wiped out in the Black Death of 1348–1351. It contains a diverse set of writings: love-lyrics and devotional texts, political songs and fabliaux, saints’ lives, courtesy literature, bible narratives, travelogues, and more. These works alternate between languages (Middle English, Anglo-Norman, and Latin), but have been placed in mutually illuminating conversation. Following an Introduction that explores how this fragmentary miscellany keeps being sutured into ‘whole’-ness by commentary upon it, individual chapters examine different genres, topics, and social groupings. Readers from literary history, medieval studies, cultural geography, gender studies, Jewish studies, book history, and more, will profit from the encounter.

Harley 2253 is famous as medieval books go, thanks to its celebrated roster of lyrics, fabliaux, and political songs, and owing to the scarcity of material extant from this ‘in-between’ period in insular literary history. England’s post-Conquest/pre-plague era remains dimly known. Despite such potential, there has never been a monograph published on Harley 2253. Harley Manuscript Geographies orients readers to this compelling material by describing the phenomenon of the medieval miscellany in textual and codicological terms. But another task it performs is to lay out grounds for approaching this compilation via the interpretive lens that cultural geography provides.

Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

University Press, 1979) is the most recent translation with parallel texts. The editors state that it is unclear whether Matilda or her successor Adeliza of Louvain commissioned the work but are content to cite a date of 1106–21 for composition, see ibid., pp. 4–5. Legge, Anglo-Norman Literature, pp. 9–14. Which refutes Peter Noble’s assertion that romance writers were not interested in Celtic material: P. S. Noble, ‘Romance in England and Normandy in the twelfth century’, in D. Bates and A. Curry (eds), England and Normandy in the Middle Ages (London and Rio Grande OH

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

–5 below. A. Gransden, Historical Writing in England c. 550 to c. 1307 (London: Routledge, 1974), p. 237; M. D. Legge, Anglo-Norman Literature and its Background (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1963), p. 75, gives the date of composition as 1174–75 and 1170–75 respectively. 27 literary sources 43 Jordan Fantosme’s Chronicle, ed. R. C. Johnstone (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981), p. xvi.; Legge, Anglo-Norman Literature, p. 75; Gransden, Historical Writing, p. 236. 44 Short, ‘Tam Angli quam Franci’, p. 153. 45 Fantosme’s Chronicle, pp. 72, 73, lines 974–83. 46 Ibid., pp. 78

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
‘Pears on a willow’?
Nadine Kuipers

Other Treatises on Estate Management and Accounting, ed. Dorothea Oschinsky (Oxford:  Clarendon Press, 1971), p.  323. William Lambarde (1536–​ 1601) had an antiquarian interest in rural Kent and copied Henley’s treatise in a personal notebook, providing his own translation. 3 See the listings for items 328, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396 in Ruth Dean, Anglo-​Norman Literature:  A Guide to Texts and Manuscripts (London: Anglo-​Norman Text Society, 1999). 4 See George R. Keiser, A Manual of the Writings in Middle English 1050–​1500. Volume 10 (Connecticut: Academy of Arts

in Household knowledges in late-medieval England and France
Abstract only
The Dunsoete Agreement and daily life in the Welsh borderlands
Lindy Brady

Writing the Welsh borderlands is unusual in Anglo-Saxon laws but very common in Welsh ones.29 T.M. Charles-Edwards has also pointed to the Dunsæte Agreement as a ‘context in which English law might influence Welsh law’.30 In blending AngloSaxon and Welsh legal practices, the Dunsæte Agreement is analogous to the post-1066 law of the March of Wales. The most important defining feature of this region was its recognised status as legally exceptional31 – even in Anglo-Norman literature, as Ralph Hanna has recently noted, the March is depicted as ‘cowboy country’ not

in Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England
Lindy Brady

’ arrival. This text marks the beginning of an important conceptual shift that would be fully evident in later Anglo-Norman literature: the transfer of a culture of outlawry from the mixed Anglo-Welsh inhabitants of the borderlands to the Welsh alone by the end of the eleventh century. 138 The transformation of the borderlands outlaw In the immediate aftermath of the Conquest, when an alliance of Mercian earls and Welsh nobles rebelled against the Normans, the borderlands were the home of outlaws sympathetically depicted. Yet such was the impact of the Norman

in Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England
The trial of Daire le Roux
Stephen D. White

’, trans. Julio Escalona Monge, Hispania: Revista Española de Historia , 57 (1997), 957–80. For a fuller discussion of treason cases, see Stephen D. White, Treacherous Lords, Duplicitous Knights, and Unfaithful Women: Treason in Medieval French and Anglo-Norman Literature (forthcoming). 2 Ganelon’s case, La chanson de Roland, ed. Frederick Whitehead, revised by T. D. Hemming (London, 1993), lines 3, 698–3, 974. For brevity’s sake I cite trials fully once and later refer to them by name, followed by the number of the note where they are fully cited. 3 The

in Law, laity and solidarities
The implications of mobility
Daniel Birkholz

, ‘Afterlife’, 24–25, 31–32. Hilton describes Worcester Cathedral as ‘a great centre of native English culture’ ( Medieval Society , 25–26). 45 Salter, English and International , 5–8, 67–71, 83. 46 Wenzel, Verses in Sermons , 40–41. The Welsh Marches were also ‘unusually fertile areas for Anglo-Norman literature’; Barrow, ‘Aethelstan’, 42–43. 47 Boffey, MSS of Lyrics , 61. 48 Edden, Index of ME Prose , 59. Ker, Medieval Libraries , 211, notes Worcester Cathedral Library MS F.61’s Worcester provenance. 49 Terms like ‘individual’, ‘private’, and ‘personal’ have

in Harley manuscript geographies