Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for :

  • "Anne Bradstreet" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Anne Bradstreet (1612–1672) Anne Bradstreet was born in Northampton, England, in 1612, the daughter of Thomas Dudley and his wife Dorothy Yorke. Thomas Dudley, a military man and a law clerk, took up a position in 1619 as steward to Theophilus Clinton, fourth Earl of Lincoln, at Sempringham, Lincolnshire, and he remained there in service for almost five years. Dudley was himself a man of great ‘Natural and Acquired Abilities’, according to a later memoir by Cotton Mather, ‘known to have a very good pen … [and] succinct and apt expression’, and the years in the

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Patricia Pender

Chapter 9 Rethinking authorial reluctance in the ­paratexts to Anne Bradstreet’s poetry Patricia Pender A nne Bradstreet’s professions of inadequacy in much-anthologised poems such as ‘The author to her book’ and ‘The prologue’ make her exemplary of the modesty we have come to expect of early modern women writers. Her renditions of abject humility before literary tradition, her apparent objection to putting herself forward in print and her professed inability to complete the poetic projects she undertook have all helped to enshrine her as the quintessential

in Early modern women and the poem

For women writers, the decades of the English Civil War were of special importance. This book presents a complex and rewarding poetic culture that is both uniquely women-centred and integrally connected to the male canonical poetry. It brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. All these five women were attracting new and concerted attention as poets by seventeenth-century women. Bradstreet's poems first appeared in The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America, and the later volume of Several Poemsincluded revised texts of those poems and several new ones. Each version of the poems spoke more directly on the context of the English Civil War. Pulter's poems construe Broadfield as a place of unwelcome isolation: she describes herself as 'shut up in a country grange', 'tied to one habitation', and 'buried, thus, alive'. Philips's poetry was first printed in 1664, her state-political poems, on members of the royal family and events of the Civil War, Interregnum, and Restoration, suggest Philips as a poet writing on matters of political significance. Cavendish's two major editions of Poems and Fancies in 1653 and 1664 each have strongly competing claims both to textual authority and to the more resonant political moment. Across poetry and prose, print and manuscript, Hutchinson's writing bears the marks of her fervent hostility to corrupt rulers and her remarkably broad education, adventurous reading habits, and energetic intellect.

Abstract only
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Introduction Women poets of the English Civil War This anthology brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. Some of these women are more familiar to students and teachers than others. Katherine Philips and Margaret Cavendish have enjoyed fame (or endured notoriety) as women poets since the first publication of their work in the 1650s and 1660s, and brief selections of their poems have

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

arranged according to their groupings in the copy-texts that we have chosen, in order to reflect something of the poems’ complex textual histories. Anne Bradstreet’s poems first appeared in The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America (1650), and the later volume of Several Poems (Boston, 1678) included revised texts of those poems, as well as a number of new ones. We have used The Tenth Muse as our copy-text in this edition for all poems that occurred in it, and Several Poems for poems printed only there. We have made this choice in part because the versions of the poems

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Editor: Susan Wiseman

In examining early modern women and the poem, this book explores how women use poetry, and how poems use women, in England and Scotland in the period 1550–1680. Several decades of critical writing on 'women's poetry', 'gender and poetry', and the representation of women, or gender, in poetry have produced a rich and complex critical and scholarly field. The book looks at the primary and secondary evidence concerning two key elements in the analysis of early modern women's writing, namely, women and the poem. It first explores the way women understood the poem in terms of the reception, influence and adaptation of past models and examples, working from the reception of classical texts. It focuses on the resources women writing poetry knew and encountered in chapters on classical inheritance, the religious sonnet sequence and the secular sonnet sequence. The book then examines the world of reading and readers, and looks at poems in terms of friendships, quarrels, competitions, coteries, networks and critical reception, both then and later. It also emphasises the tales that poems tell, and how those stories both register and shape the understanding of women and the poem in the world of potential readers. In examining women and the poem, the use of women as signifiers and bearers of meaning in poetry is as significant as women's literary production.

Abstract only
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Further reading Anne Bradstreet Gray, Catharine, Women Writers and Public Debate in Seventeenth-Century Britain (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007) Hensley, Jeannine (ed.), The Works of Anne Bradstreet, with a foreword by Adrienne Rich (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1967) Jed, Stephanie, ‘The Tenth Muse: Gender, Rationality and the Marketing of Knowledge’, in Margo Hendricks and Patricia Parker (eds), Women, ‘Race’, and Writing in the Early Modern Period (London and New York: Routledge, 1994), pp. 195–208 Pender, Patricia

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Abstract only
Accession, union, nationhood
Christopher Ivic

Scotland, by Re-vniting them into one Great Britain. In two parts: by John Bristol . For a reading of Anne Bradstreet’s The Tenth Muse (1650) within the context of a transatlantic ‘Britishness’, see Christopher Ivic, ‘“Our British Land”: Anne Bradstreet’s Atlantic perspective’, in Simon Mealor and Philip Schwyzer (eds), Archipelagic Identities: Literature and Identity in the Atlantic Archipelago, 1550–1800 (Farnham: Ashgate, 2004), 195–204.

in The subject of Britain, 1603–25
Abstract only
Rachel Adcock, Sara Read, and Anna Ziomek

by both Calvin’s doctrinal arguments and Greek thought, was encouraging believers to look inside themselves in order to discern the conflict between the sinful flesh and the regenerative spirit. This kind of introspection produced a growing number of poetic dialogues, often didactic in tone, that positioned the flesh and spirit in the midst of an argument about which one was the dominant force. For instance, the Puritan poet Anne Bradstreet included one such dialogue between ‘The Flesh and the Spirit’ in her Several Poems (published posthumously in 1678), where the

in Flesh and Spirit
The Quaker search for the true knowledge
Catie Gill

well as Bateman’s poem, others in this mode by Andrew Marvell and Anne Bradstreet show the soul and body in what Marvell referred to as ‘a dialogue’.42 In this work, ‘A Dialogue between the Resolved Soul and Created Pleasure’, we are reminded, in Stanley Fish’s words, that what Marvell is in search of is ‘self-sufficient’ simplicity.43 Marvell shows that there is an insightfulness to be found when embracing a world view rejecting humane learning, since the reward is an innate experience that had the property of being organic and, more than that, potentially complete

in Radical voices, radical ways