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Authors: Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

This book explores how different publics make sense of and evaluate anti-terrorism powers within the UK, and the implications of this for citizenship and security.

Since 9/11, the UK’s anti-terrorism framework has undergone dramatic changes, including with the introduction of numerous new pieces of legislation. Drawing on primary empirical research, this book examines the impact of these changes on security and citizenship, as perceived by citizens themselves. We examine such impacts on different communities within the UK, and find that generally, whilst white individuals were not unconcerned about the effects of anti-terrorism, ethnic minority citizens (and not Muslim communities alone) believe that anti-terrorism measures have had a direct, negative impact on various dimensions of their citizenship and security.

This book thus offers the first systematic engagement with ‘vernacular’ or ‘everyday’ understandings of anti-terrorism policy, citizenship and security. Beyond an empirical analysis of citizen attitudes, it argues that while transformations in anti-terrorism frameworks impact on public experiences of security and citizenship, they do not do so in a uniform, homogeneous, or predictable manner. At the same time, public understandings and expectations of security and citizenship themselves shape how developments in anti-terrorism frameworks are discussed and evaluated. The relationships between these phenomenon, in other words, are both multiple and co-constitutive. By detailing these findings, this book adds depth and complexity to existing studies of the impact of anti-terrorism powers.

The book will be of interest to a wide range of academic disciplines including Political Science, International Relations, Security Studies and Sociology.

Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

In preceding chapters, we explored the different ways in which citizens conceive of security and insecurity, and the ways in which anti-terrorism powers are interpreted and evaluated by UK publics, including in relation to their impacts on aspects of citizenship. In this chapter, we now bring these analyses together, examining the relationship between conceptions or

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Historical trends and contemporary issues
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

violences describable as terrorist have a considerable history, so too do governmental efforts to combat, prevent and respond thereto. Our argument in this chapter is that understanding the significance of the UK government’s recent anti-terrorism efforts requires locating these in historical and geographical context. This involves exploring previous anti-terrorism campaigns, as well as contrasting them

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

This chapter follows the previous discussion of public evaluations of anti-terrorism powers by examining the impact thereof on citizens and citizenship more specifically. Two main findings from our research are discussed. First, that anti-terrorism powers have impacted – variably – on four key aspects of citizenship: rights, participation, identity and duties. As

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

There are, as we have seen, numerous reasons to take public understandings, experiences and discussions of anti-terrorism powers more seriously than has been the case to date. In the first instance, doing so offers opportunity, as argued in Chapter 1 , for thinking through efficacy and impact in this particular area of security policy. It also, as outlined in Chapter 2

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Brazil’s ambiguous entrance into the Global War on Terror
Camila de Macedo Braga and Ana Maura Tomesani

to some restrictions. For example, neither military aid nor direct anti-terrorism activities are ODA-eligible as this generally implies some form of military costs. Nonetheless, a considerable number of activities associated with the prevention or mitigation of terrorism are ODA-eligible. These include programs to strengthen the capabilities of border security patrols to

in Counter-terrorism and civil society
A Military Tactic or Collateral Damage?
Abdulkarim Ekzayez and Ammar Sabouni

, they have been under constant and targeted attack as part of the weaponisation strategy of the GoS ( Fouad et al. , 2017 ). During the peaceful uprising, anyone found to be assisting wounded demonstrators or activists was prosecuted, tortured and sometimes killed. In 2012 the GoS effectively criminalised medical neutrality through anti-terrorism legislation that allowed prosecution of those treating demonstrators injured by government forces ( Fouad et al. , 2017 ). Doctors working in government hospitals were forced to misfile the cause of death of bodies of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Anti-terrorism powers and vernacular (in)securities
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

The two preceding chapters focused on public understandings of anti-terrorism policy and the implications of these for the status and practice of citizenship. As we saw, and perhaps as we might expect, there is no unidirectional relationship between these entities. While many people in the UK feel that their experience of citizenship has been adversely affected by developments

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Implications for human security, civil society, and charities
Kawser Ahmed and Scott N. Romaniuk

(Bearne et al., 2005 : 6). Unlike the Charity Regulatory Commission in the UK, Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is the lead government organization monitoring charitable organizations 1 and there are guidelines about “giving” and charities are expected to follow the rules (Blumberg, 2018 ). 2 However, part six of the Anti-Terrorism Act details how

in Counter-terrorism and civil society
Tensions between democracy and homeland security
Aries A. Arugay

elites and their partners in civil society. Civil society under threat: the establishment of anti-terrorism laws and the impact on civil society in Philippines For decades, the Philippines has been fighting a Muslim secessionist group in the southern island of Mindanao. It has also the longest running Maoist-inspired communist insurgency in the world as

in Counter-terrorism and civil society