Rethinking Europe’s strategies and policies
Authors: Weiqing Song and Jianwei Wang

Since the mid-1990s, the European Union has defined the Asia-Pacific as one of its key strategic targets on its ambitious road towards global power. The EU has ever since made consistent efforts to implement strategies, policies and activities in the Asia-Pacific. Over the past decades, big changes have taken place on both sides and the wider world. It is high time to evaluate the EU’s performance in its Asian policy. In fact, the EU is at crossroads with its Asia Pacific policy. On several aspects, the EU is compelled to redefine its interests and roles, and rethink its strategies and policies towards the dynamic and ever-important Asia-Pacific region of the contemporary world. This volume addresses this theme, by elaborating the general context, major issues and countries in the EU’s Asia-Pacific policy. It covers issues and areas of traditional security, economy and trade, public diplomacy, and human security and focuses on the EU’s relations with China, Japan, the ASEAN countries and Australasia.

This book addresses some of the neglected problems, people and vulnerabilities of the Asia-Pacific region. It talks about emancipation, human security, 'security politics', language and threat-construction. The book is divided into three sections: agents; strategies and contexts; and futures. The first section outlines a range of possible agents or actors potentially capable of redressing individual suffering and vulnerability in the region. It examines East Asian regional institutions and dynamics of regionalism as potential sources of 'progressive' security discourses and practices. There is focus on the progressive security potential of regional institutions and regionalism has become increasingly prominent in literature on security in the Asia-Pacific. Two common interpretations of the role of epistemic communities in the construction of security are contested: that they are either passive sources of governmental legitimacy, or autonomous agents with the capacity of constructing or creating state interests. The second section reviews strategies and contexts, outlining a range of different sites of insecurity in the region, the ways in which dominant security discourses and practices emerge, and the extent to which such discourses are contested in different contexts. Indonesian government's approach to minority groups and separatism, the issue of civil unrest and human rights abuses in Burma, and the Australian government's attitude towards refugees and asylum-seekers are discussed. The third section deals with security futures, specifically discussing the question of what alternative security discourses and practices might look like. Finally, the book outlines a feminist critical security discourse and examines its applicability to the Asia-Pacific region.

A critical security appraisal
Marianne Hanson

, Russia and the US, all of which possess sizable arsenals and which show every indication that they will retain these indefinitely. While this book’s focus has been on a more limited designation of what constitutes the Asia-Pacific geographically, the current chapter broadens these geographic parameters to look also at US and Russian nuclear issues. This is done so in the belief

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Fulvio Attinà

3 European Union security policy and initiatives in the Asia-Pacific Fulvio Attinà The national security policies of the states and the collective and multilateral management of international security problems in regions like the European and the Asian region have gone through a remarkable process of transformation passing from the past to the contemporary world system. The traditional instruments for providing security to the state like hi-tech armaments and well-trained armies, and also the ways of building security in geographically limited international

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Miguel Otero-Iglesias

4 Assessing the European Union’s economic relations with the Asia-Pacific Miguel Otero-Iglesias Introduction Over the past decade a number of factors have increased the interest of the European Union (EU) and its member states in the Asia-Pacific region: the global financial crisis initiated in the US in 2007–8, which showed the weaknesses of US-led financial capitalism; the Eurozone crisis in 2010–12, which demonstrated the structural flaws of the single currency and the sclerotic state of the Old Continent; Obama’s 2011 “pivot” to Asia, which confirmed that

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Matt McDonald

A NY SURVEY OF THE processes, dynamics or futures of security in the Asia-Pacific would clearly be incomplete without engagement with the role played by the United States. Indeed, US hegemony 1 has been the defining feature of East Asian security architecture and interaction since the Second World War. And according to traditional accounts, particularly

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Strategic reflections
Michael Reiterer

1 The European Union in the Asia-Pacific: strategic reflections Michael Reiterer Introduction Although the EU maintains four (China, Japan, Republic of Korea, India) out of its ten strategic partnerships with Asian partners (Reiterer, 2013a) and is contemplating adding a fifth (with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, ASEAN), doubts are harboured in Asia whether the EU can be a genuine strategic partner. Perceptions may not match: the EU has over the years developed policy papers dealing with Asia in general (Europe and Asia: A Strategic Framework for

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
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The European Union’s Asia-Pacific strategies and policies at the crossroads
Weiqing Song and Jianwei Wang

Introduction: The European Union’s Asia-Pacific strategies and policies at the crossroads Weiqing Song and Jianwei Wang The EU’s global reach to the Asia-Pacific region Europe is an old player in the Asia-Pacific region because several European states have substantial links with the region, mostly due to their colonial histories. Meanwhile, Europe is also a new player in the region, because the EU has had substantial ties with the region only for about two decades. The EU officially embarked upon its global adventure as an international player after the

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Gendered legacies and feminist futures in the Asia-Pacific
Katrina Lee-Koo

T HE VIOLENCE AND vastness of gendered insecurities in the Asia-Pacific remains confronting, and crosses the spectrum of insecurities seen worldwide. While many of these insecurities, like poverty, lack of access to political power or the spread of HIV/AIDS are not specific to gender, or indeed the Asia-Pacific, they do affect different women and men in

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Making environmental security ‘critical’ in the Asia-Pacific
Lorraine Elliott

E NVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION and resource decline, and the important matter of how to overcome them, have become crucial challenges for the Asia-Pacific. While the policy debate is usually driven by economic and social concerns, there is a growing acceptance that these challenges also figure in the regional security agenda and, indeed, that they complicate that

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific