Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

Origins The category of Australian Gothic covers a broad range of film texts, with the first representatives appearing in the early 1970s at the same time as the ‘Ocker’ comedies. The films given this label share a variety of common characteristics, but the best known examples ( The Last Wave (Peter Weir, 1977), the Mad Max trilogy (Dr George Miller, 1979/1981/1985). Shame (Steve Jodrell, 1987)) illustrate the variations in setting, characterisation and mode that the films essay. The environments chosen

in Contemporary Australian cinema
An introduction
Editor: Jonathan Rayner

This book offers introductory readings of some of the well-known and less well-known feature productions coming out of Australia since the revival in the national film industry at the end of the 1960s. The interpretations of the texts and the careers of their makers are considered in relation to the emergence of an indigenous film culture and the construction of national identity. The majority of the films examined in the book have had theatrical or video releases in the UK. The independent development of several indigenous film genres has been an important feature of recent production, and helped to punctuate and bracket the streams of feature production that have evolved since 1970. These Australian genres have been identified and evaluated (the Australian Gothic, the period film, the male ensemble film) and are worthy of consideration both in their own right and in their intersection with other conventionalised forms. These include science fiction, fantasy and horror in comparison with the Gothic, the heritage film and literary adaptation in connection with the period film, and the war film and rite of passage in relation to the male ensemble. More recently, an aesthetic and thematic trend has emerged in the examples of Strictly Ballroom, The Adventures of Priscilla, and Muriel's Wedding, which foregrounds elements of the camp, the kitsch and the retrospective idolisation of 1970s Glamour. Such chronological, stylistic and thematic groupings are important in the interpretation of national filmmaking.

Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

revival re-emphasises several key issues already acknowledged in relation to the Ocker comedies and the Australian Gothic. Commercial and artistic aspirations are again seen to be in conflict both with each other and with the notion of a filmic national identity. The locally popular and commercially successful Ocker films had represented a double-edged sword as the first feature films to appear, since they generated a financial return at the expense of a reputable and respectable national image. The acceptance (if not the

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Finding meaning and identity in the rural Australian landscape
Jonathan Rayner

barren landscape bereft of cultural history) but by culture . (Collins, 1999 : 23) Landscape and recrimination In the often hybridised generic territory referred to as the Australian Gothic, the landscape is a key element in the exploration of cultural anxieties arising from colonial experience. The questioning of the validity and durability

in Cinematic countrysides
Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

also the crucible for the stoical and self-reliant aspects of national character which he incarnates. The AFC genre institutionalises Australian-ness in relation to romantic pastoral ideals (as in The Man from Snowy River ), or an uncomplicated distillation of colonial, cultural heritage. The Australian Gothic also defines Australian characteristics in relation to the features of the natural, rural landscape, but perceives the same environmental influences as unremittingly negative (as in Wake in Fright, Shame , and The

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Isabella van Elferen

–30 . Internet sources ‘About Sopor Æternus and the Ensemble of Shadows’. www.soporaeternus.de/Info.html . Accessed 18 August 2011. American Goth. http://americangoth.com/. Accessed 25 September 2011. Australian gothic Forum. Posting 2 July 2011. www.gothic.org.au/Brisbane/viewthreat.php?tid54426&page53 . Accessed 24 August 2011. Blackweb

in Globalgothic
Australian films in the 1990s
Jonathan Rayner

perceptions of Australianness at home and overseas in the years following the 1988 Bicentennial. Many of the films produced in the 1990s, including those not financed by the AFFC, are derived from generic bases, but these conventionalised forms are chosen to be breached as often as observed. In developing, transforming or hybridising existing generic forms (the Australian Gothic and the rite of passage, and the American road movie and musical), recent Australian films have constructed a new image for the industry and the country

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

genres is a major trend within the Australian revival. Additionally, the independent development of several indigenous film genres has been an important feature of recent production, and has helped to punctuate and bracket the streams of feature production that have evolved since 1970. These Australian genres have been identified and evaluated (the Australian Gothic, the period film, the male ensemble film 32 ) and are worthy of consideration both in their own right and in their intersection with other conventionalised forms (science

in Contemporary Australian cinema