Open Access (free)
Serbian and Croatian victim-centred propaganda and the war in Yugoslavia

Comparing and contrasting propaganda in Serbia and Croatia from 1986 to 1999, this book analyses each group's contemporary interpretations of history and current events. It offers a detailed discussion of Holocaust imagery and the history of victim-centred writing in nationalist theory, including the links between the comparative genocide debate, the so-called Holocaust industry, and Serbian and Croatian nationalism. There is a detailed analysis of Serbian and Croatian propaganda over the Internet, detailing how and why the Internet war was as important as the ground wars in Kosovo, Croatia and Bosnia-Hercegovina, and a theme-by-theme analysis of Serbian and Croatian propaganda, using contemporary media sources, novels, academic works and journals.

This text focuses on the far right in the Balkan region, i.e., in Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Albania, Bulgaria and Romania. The ideological features, strategy and tactics, internal organization, leadership and collaboration in far right parties are treated under the label "internal supply-side". The "external supply side", then, includes the analysis of political, social, economic, ethno-cultural and international variables. The final chapters deal with voters for the far right, legislative implementation and far right organizations. The analysis of the far right parties in Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Albania, Bulgaria and Romania shows the main factors important for the success of these parties in these countries are: charismatic leadership and strong party organization, the position and strategy of the mainstream parties, the state-building process, a strong national minority or diaspora abroad, electoral design and an international configuration.

Věra Stojarová

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 01/16/2014, SPi 3 Historical legacies of the Balkan Far Right This chapter looks at the Second World War predecessors of current formations on the Far Right and presents the overall context which existed during the 1980s and 1990s in the former Yugoslavia at the height of nationalism. The historical chapter is essential in understanding the overall context of nationalism in the Balkans and the rise of the Far Right formations. The Croatian Far Right The historical legacies of the Croatian Far Right date back to the nineteenth century

in The Far Right in the Balkans
Věra Stojarová

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 01/16/2014, SPi 4 An overview of Far Right political parties in the Balkan region and political party selection The aim of this chapter is to describe the overall Far Right scene in the region and indicate cases for further analysis. In order to be preselected for further investigation, the party must have been depicted by researchers as a Far Right party and must have gained at least one seat during parliamentary elections in the 2000–2010 period. The Far Right in Croatia In 1999, Ivan Grdešić noted that the presence of the Croatian

in The Far Right in the Balkans
Abstract only
Robin Wilson

shocks, from a Balkan comparison Macedonia emerges – at least until the stalemate with Greece over the name of the country – as somewhat more successful than Northern Ireland, with continuous power-sharing post-Ohrid rather than suffering repeated suspensions, while B-H represents a failed state. A closer look at the constitutional engineering shows that power-sharing has consolidated and conflicting

in The Northern Ireland experience of conflict and agreement
Open Access (free)
Confronting relativism in Serbia and Croatia
David Bruce MacDonald

: confronting relativism in Serbia and Croatia root of conflict. In trying to analyse the successes and failures of Serbian and Croatian propaganda, we need to understand clearly whether or not any actual genocides took place in the Balkans, either in history, or during the more contemporary period. This includes the general question of whether the manipulation of Holocaust imagery is a useful means for nations to advance their political agendas. I have argued that general Fall imagery and imagery of the Holocaust have played an extremely important role in rallying

in Balkan holocausts?
David Bruce MacDonald

opportunities opened up for such people, and their contacts with Croatia grew stronger. The Croatian nationalist movement was eventually led by the former Communist general and historian Franjo Tudjman. Tudjman, born in 1922, was the youngest general in Yugoslav history, and also served as Tito’s Head Political Commissar. Tudjman was an extremely successful, high-ranking 99 2441Chapter4 16/10/02 8:04 am Page 100 Balkan holocausts? Communist, and a true believer, before his conversion to nationalism in the 1960s. It was only in 1967 when he began to challenge the official

in Balkan holocausts?
Open Access (free)
The Second World War and the Balkan Historikerstreit
David Bruce MacDonald

2441Chapter5 16/10/02 8:05 am Page 132 5 Masking the past: the Second World War and the Balkan Historikerstreit A very considerable part of the Croatian political elite, supported by the Catholic hierarchy and Archbishop Alojzije Stepinac himself, supported this national and religious intolerance, and strongly supported policies of clericalism and racism, marked by mass killings, forced conversions and the deportation of the Serbian Orthodox population as well the slaughter of the Jews and Gypsies. (Dušan Bataković, ‘The National Integration of the Serbs

in Balkan holocausts?
The Moslem question in Bosnia-Hercegovina
David Bruce MacDonald

concealed an Islamic conspiracy to take over Europe. While the third theme will be discussed later, it is useful to understand the first one clearly. To summarise this argument: while the Moslems of Bosnia had been forced to convert to Islam, certain linguistic and cultural attributes still marked them as either Serb or Croat. Bosnian Moslems were seen to be members of one religious community, while at the same time belonging to an 221 2441Chapter8 16/10/02 8:06 am Page 222 Balkan holocausts? altogether different ethnic group. Because of these highly contested

in Balkan holocausts?
David Bruce MacDonald

legitimating the dismantling of the Yugoslav Federation, and the expansionist ambitions of Milošević and his colleagues. Kosovo, and more general myths of Golden Age and Fall, were instrumentalised first in the case of the Kosovar Albanians, and secondly, and more importantly, in the case of the Croats. As the conflict progressed, writers came to identify a Serbian version of anti-Semitism – ‘Serbophobia’ – a genocidal and expansionist strategy, supposedly used throughout history by Serbia’s T HIS CHAPTER CHARTS 63 2441Chapter3 16/10/02 8:04 am Page 64 Balkan

in Balkan holocausts?