Search results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • "Barbara Steele" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Horror, Cinephilia and Barbara Steele
Ian Olney

Regarded by fans and critics alike as the Queen of Horror, Barbara Steele stands as one of the few bona fide cult icons of the genre, whose ability to project an uncanny blend of deathliness and eroticism imbues her characters with a kind of necrophiliac appeal. Horror film scholars have tended to read Steele‘s films in feminist terms, as texts that play to our fascination with the monstrous-feminine. This article approaches them from a different standpoint – that of cinephilia studies. Steele‘s cult horror films are at their most basic level horror movies about cinephilia, presenting her as the very embodiment of the ghostly medium that cinephiles cherish. In so doing, they convert Steele into a necrophiliac fetish-object, an intoxicating fusion of death and desire. Considering Steele‘s work from this perspective reveals the fluidity of the boundary between horror and cinephilia, demonstrating that horror has something important to teach us about cinephilia and cinephilia has something important to teach us about horror.

Film Studies
Exclusions and exchanges in the history of European horror
Peter Hutchings

aware of the British product. It is therefore unsurprising that British actors started showing up in European gothic horror films during the 1960s – for example, the established British horror star Christopher Lee, who worked on similar projects in Germany, Italy and Spain, or Robert Flemyng, who starred in Ricardo Freda’s Italian horror The Terror of Dr Hichcock (1962). Perhaps the best-known British horror export to the continent in the early 1960s was Barbara Steele, a minor starlet for the Rank

in Hammer and beyond
Abstract only
David Annwn Jones

, and the signing of particular nichemarket horror calendars lifts the price of even the more recent products such as Mario Bava’s Black Sunday calendar, 1995, signed by actress Barbara Steele. The dark-themed TV series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Charmed , have all commissioned franchised calendars and The Munsters calendar has appeared as recently as 2010, as

in Gothic effigy
Abstract only
Never your typical ‘nice blonde’
Andrew Roberts

actresses who were given opportunities in Hollywood and European films that had been denied them in the UK. One could add the names of Jean Simmons, Barbara Steele, Ann Lynn and Barbara Ferris to this list, but Syms’s finest work was in British films. Sue Harper and Vincent Porter saw the 1950s as a decade in which, from 1954 onwards, there were two symbolic worlds in British cinema – the first being ‘regular, dry, tidy, and empty’ while the second was ‘asymmetrical, wet, viscous, disorderly, and full-to-bursting’ ( 2003 : 271). For much of her career in mainstream cinema

in Idols of the Odeons
Peter Hutchings

had just become available. They also, to a limited extent, shared some creative personnel. (This was mainly the case with actors: for example, British cult actress Barbara Steele made films in Italy, America and Britain.) However, the ways in which British, Italian and American cinema responded to these common elements were in the main determined by factors operative within their respective national contexts. Moreover, while there was undoubtedly an international market for horror at this time (an

in Hammer and beyond
Peter Hutchings

herself 10 By contrast, the comparably themed Italian horror film La Maschera del Demonio (aka Black Sunday aka The Mask of Satan , 1960) makes great play with the similarities between the good and the evil woman, primarily by having the same actress (Barbara Steele) play both

in Terence Fisher
Abstract only
Horror production
Peter Hutchings

accounts, he ended up directing almost half of the film himself. There followed in 1965 his first complete feature, another horror film by the title of La Sorella di Satana ( Revenge of the Blood Beast ), which starred Barbara Steele and Ian Ogilvy. Returning to Britain, Reeves spent a year trying to set up various projects before completing The Sorcerers with Boris Karloff in 1967, which was followed in 1968 by Witchfinder General . He was to direct The Oblong Box but fell ill and was

in Hammer and beyond
Abstract only
Mary P. Wood

Danza macabra , Alan takes a bet to stay overnight in a haunted house where he falls under the spell of the darkly beautiful Elizabeth (Barbara Steele), in spite of the fact that she tells him that she has been dead for ten years. Unbalanced and asymmetrical architectural compositions mirror the cycle of increasingly hysterical sexual couplings, and the constant return of Elizabeth’s murderous former lover. Alan wins his bet but goes mad

in European film noir