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Hitchcock’s secret sharer
Jack Sullivan

10 1 Bernard Herrmann: Hitchcock’s secret sharer Jack Sullivan P  artners in Suspense celebrates a great director–​composer collaboration that fascinates even people who normally don’t think about film music. This ­chapter addresses that partnership both as a very special professional connection between a director and composer and also as an intense Conradian relationship that was as volatile as it was productive. Because he was so meticulously involved with the musical process, Hitchcock often had a close working relationship with his composers, but here the

in Partners in suspense
Critical essays on Bernard Herrmann and Alfred Hitchcock

For a decade from 1955, Alfred Hitchcock worked almost exclusively with one composer: Bernard Herrmann. From The Trouble with Harry to the bitter spat surrounding Torn Curtain, the partnership gave us some of cinema’s most memorable musical moments, taught us to stay out of the shower, away from heights and never to spend time in corn fields. Consequently, fascination with their work and relationship endures fifty years later. This volume of new, spellbinding essays explores their tense working relationship as well as their legacy, from crashing cymbals to the sound of The Birds.

The volume brings together new work and new perspectives on the relationship between Hitchcock and Herrmann. Featuring new essays by leading scholars of Hitchcock’s work, including Richard Allen, Charles Barr, Murray Pomerance, Sidney Gottlieb, and Jack Sullivan, the volume examines the working relationship between the pair and the contribution that Herrmann’s work brings to Hitchcock’s idiom. Examining key works, including The Man Who Knew Too Much, Psycho, Marnie and Vertigo, the collection explores approaches to sound, music, collaborative authorship and the distinctive contribution that Herrmann’s work with Hitchcock brought to this body of films.

Partners in Suspense examines the significance, meanings, histories and enduring legacies of one of film history’s most important partnerships. By engaging with the collaborative work of Hitchcock and Herrmann, the essays in the collection examine the ways in which film directors and composers collaborate, how this collaboration is experienced in the film text, and the ways such a partnership inspires later work.

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Film Music, Time and Bernard Herrmann
David Butler

The tendency in most writing on the temporal properties of film music has been to note music‘s ability to establish, quickly and efficiently, a films historical setting. Although acknowledging this important function, this paper seeks to explore a wider range of temporal properties fulfilled by film music. Three aspects of musics temporality are discussed: anachronism (whereby choices of anachronistic music can provide the spectator with ways of making sense of a films subtext or its characters’ state of mind), navigation (the ability of music to help the spectator understand where and when they are in a films narrative) and expansion (musics ability to expand our experience of film time). The paper focuses on Bernard Herrmann, and his score for Taxi Driver (1976), and argues that Herrmann was particularly sensitive to the temporal possibilities of film music.

Film Studies
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K. J. Donnelly and Steven Rawle

1 Introduction K. J. Donnelly and Steven Rawle F or a decade from 1955, Alfred Hitchcock worked almost exclusively with one composer:  Bernard Herrmann. From The Trouble with Harry (1955) to the bitter spat surrounding Torn Curtain (1966), the partnership gave us some of cinema’s most memorable musical moments, taught us to stay out of the shower, away from heights and never to spend time in corn fields. Consequently, fascination with their work and relationship endures fifty years later. This book brings together new work and new perspectives on the

in Partners in suspense
Bernard Herrmann and The Man Who Knew Too Much
Murray Pomerance

75 6 Portentous arrangements: Bernard Herrmann and The Man Who Knew Too Much Murray Pomerance T here is little question among scholars of cinematic music and scholars of Hitchcock that the Hitchcock–​Herrmann collaboration was, on balance, a profoundly positive one that left us with not only the playful The Trouble with Harry (1955) but at least five masterpieces of film –​The Wrong Man (1956), Vertigo (1958), North by Northwest (1959), Psycho (1960) and Marnie (1964) –​this notwithstanding the composer’s summative recollection to Royal Brown (1994) that he

in Partners in suspense
A figurative dance suite
David Cooper

100 8 A dance to the music of Herrmann: a figurative dance suite David Cooper M Prelude y earliest encounter with the music of Bernard Herrmann was in the early 1970s, as a teenager growing up in Belfast who was interested in contemporary music and always on the lookout for the scores of new pieces I could afford to buy. I  discovered by sheer chance the music for Bernard Herrmann’s Echoes for string quartet in Tughan-​Crane’s music shop, a somewhat surprising piece for them to have in stock. It was some time later that I found a coupling of the work on LP

in Partners in suspense
Post-mortem
William H. Rosar

successful and celebrated associations between a film director and composer ended in 1966 with Torn Curtain, a fact that has been lamented ever since by devotees of both Alfred Hitchcock and Bernard Herrmann, all the more since the film itself proved unsuccessful at the box office. But the handwriting was already on the wall well before then, and the seeds of Hitchcock’s discontent really originated not so much out of conflict with Herrmann, but with the studio system and its established procedures for film scoring. In his memoir Music for the Movies, Louis Levy recorded

in Partners in suspense
A rejected score’s place in a discography
Gergely Hubai

165 12 Mending the Torn Curtain: a rejected score’s place in a discography Gergely Hubai A lot has been said about Bernard Herrmann’s Torn Curtain (1966), ranging from Steven Smith’s biography of the composer (1991: 267–​74) to Jack Sullivan’s Hitchcock’s Music (2006: 276–​89), or my book, Torn Music, which gives a chronological overview of rejected scores from all over history (Hubai, 2012: 62–​ 7). Instead of dwelling on the details of that fateful day when Herrmann and Hitchcock called it quits, this chapter examines the musical afterlife of the score and

in Partners in suspense
Marnie (1964)
K. J. Donnelly

135 10 Musical romanticism v. the sexual aberrations of the criminal female: Marnie (1964) K. J. Donnelly M arnie has an unerringly romantic orchestral score by Bernard Herrmann, which upon reflection seems slightly at odds with the film. The score’s character does not quite seem to fit the film’s dark heart and it is tempting to imagine that Hitchcock and Herrmann diverged to a degree in their conception of the film.1 Upon initial release, Marnie was less of a success than Hitchcock’s previous films, although the film’s critical stature has grown since 1964

in Partners in suspense
Royal S. Brown

quasi-​causal structure that artificially creates tension and inevitable resolution. The Webernian Klangfarbenmelodie, for instance, effectively isolates the tone colours of the various instruments involved in a given composition as sound rather than subordinating those timbres, rhythms, textures, etc. to broader, quasi-​Symbolic harmonic, rhythmic, textural, etc. determinations. All of which brings us to Bernard Herrmann. I have no intention of suggesting that Herrmann ever composed on what many would call the ‘advanced’ level of a Schoenberg or a Webern. Even in the

in Partners in suspense