Search results

Chris Abel

4 Technics and the human Though some of the writers discussed in the last two chapters offer examples of the use of tools and other artifacts in their theories of cognitive extension, none of them pursues the wider implications for the technological development of human culture, or the possible role of the extended self in that development. For a more comprehensive view of the impacts of technology on human behavior and evolution, or technics as it is known in the broadest sense, the dis­ cussion now turns to Bernard Stiegler, one of the current generation of

in The extended self
Chris Abel

5 Rethinking evolution Most readers of a work of this kind will have at least a rudimentary knowledge of Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection, sufficient up till this point to appreciate why architectural theorists and others should take such a strong interest in the kind of issues discussed in this book. However, if, as Edward Hall suggested and Bernard Stiegler has since argued at great length, technology has played a major role in the evolution of Homo sapiens, distinguishing it from all other species, the question arises as to whether our species is

in The extended self
Abstract only
Architecture, memes and minds
Author: Chris Abel

While there is widespread agreement across disciplines that the identities of individuals, groups and places are significantly interrelated, there are equally divergent views as to the nature and origins of those relationships. The first part of the book highlights that the prime importance of the human body in spatial cognition and human perception generally. In stressing the fundamental role of the body as the medium of all personal experience, the concept of the self that emerges thus far retains a strong unitary core. An alternative theory of extended minds which retains the integrity of individual human agents while embracing the extension of personal powers by external devices is also discussed. The second part looks at the scope of inquiry to take in the wider impact of technology on human evolution and the extended self. Selected writings from some of Stiegler's prominent followers and critics were also examined for what they contribute to our understanding of Stiegler's ideas and their possible further applications. He and his followers continue to fall back upon neo-Darwinian concepts and terminologies in elaborating their ideas. Theories of emergence and self-production, or autopoiesis, are investigated as promising alternatives to orthodox evolutionary theory. The subject of design, function of memes, impacts of the coevolution of humankind and technology on the human mind and the self are some other concepts discussed. The third part of the book focuses talk about cognitive roots of classification and combinativity, the relations between form and content, and vernacular architecture.

Sam Haddow

necessary to broaden the analytic scope and consider alternative methods of engagement. A  useful place to begin, I believe, is with the philosophy of Bernard Stiegler. Spiritual misery Since his early collaborations with Jacques Derrida before the latter’s death in 2004, Stiegler’s work has been characterised as much by its grounding in concrete societal concerns (education and youth policy; the pharmaceutical industries; the influence of television and the media) as by its distinctive intellectual apparatus. A  key point of connection for these concerns is a concept

in Precarious spectatorship
Abstract only
Chris Abel

Part II summary Commencing in Chapter 4 with an examination of Bernard Stiegler’s theory of technics, the second part of this book opened up the scope of inquiry to take in the wider impact of technology on human evolution and the extended self. While Stiegler overlooks the making and use of tools by primates and other creatures, he argues convincingly that the accumulative effects of humankind’s technical exteriorization, or what he crisply describes as the coevolution of the ‘who and the what,’ sets our species apart from any other. Selected writings from some

in The extended self
Abstract only
Chris Abel

theories of creativity advanced by several like-minded authors during the last century were quoted before proceeding to Brian Arthur’s ‘combinatorial theory’ of technological evolution, closing an important gap in Bernard Stiegler’s work regarding the evolutionary agents involved in human technicity. Significantly, while Arthur arrived independently at his own interpretation of the self-producing character of evolving technologies, he also explicitly acknowledges parallels with the work of Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varella on autopoietic systems. Finally, the

in The extended self
Abstract only
Chris Abel

-Darwinian concepts of natural selection that provide little help in understanding the modern condition, and how we came to shape the world in our own image to the extent that the phrase ‘natural environment’ has little meaning anymore; not the least outcome being the urbanization of half the global population, along with possibly irreversible changes to the climate and biosphere. Following Bernard Stiegler,7 the philosopher of human technics whose work is discussed at length in this book, and Timothy Taylor,8 an archaeologist who arrived at much the same conclusion from his own

in The extended self
Mnemotechnics and the ghost of ‘the folk’
Sas Mays

technicity, see the introduction to Louis Armand and Arthur Bradley (eds), Technicity, Prague: Litteraria Pragensia, 2006. 5 Jacques Derrida and Bernard Stiegler, Echographies of Television: Filmed Interviews [1996], Cambridge: Polity Press, 2002, p. 129. 6 Jacques Derrida, Copy, Archive, Signature: A Conversation on Photography [2000], ed. Gerhard Richter, trans. Jeff Fort, Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010, p. 39. 7 Jacques Lacan, ‘The Instance of the Letter in the Unconscious, or Reason Since Freud’ [1957], in Écrits, trans. Bruce Fink, New York and

in The machine and the ghost
Abstract only
Trauma-tragedy and the contemporary moment
Patrick Duggan

responding and in which I have developed it. Just as Raymond Williams explored the possibility of modern tragedy in a dramatized society so I am supplementing his arguments to consider the possibility of an artistic figuring of, or response to, trauma in a traumatized society/culture. Trauma-tragedy is a model of contemporary performance that has arisen in response to the de-cathected, individualized and flattened society in which we live at the beginning of the twentyfirst century.1 Bernard Stiegler formulates a notion of contemporary, latecapitalist consumer society as

in Trauma-tragedy
Christine Kiehl

’s report for Les Inrockuptibles, 27 January 2009. Fabienne Pascaud, Télérama n° 3079. Ibid. Bernard Stiegler, De la Misère symbolique, La catastrophe du sensible (Paris: Galilée, 2005), pp. 281–2. Fabienne Pascaud, Télérama. H. Barker, Ces tristes lieux, pourquoi faut-il que tu y entres?, Actes Sud, 2009, p. 18. Jacques Rancière, Le Spectateur émancipé (Paris: La Fabrique éditions, 2008), p. 20. My translation of « […] les processus de production aussi bien que de consommation […] qui vise à capter et à canaliser la libido des individus, et à réduire toutes singularités

in Howard Barker’s Art of Theatre