Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • "Bible Christians" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Persistent preachers, 1807–1907
Author: Jennifer Lloyd

A response to the prominent Methodist historian David Hempton's call to analyse women's experience within Methodism, this book deals with British Methodist women preachers over the entire nineteenth century, with special emphasis on the Primitive Methodists and Bible Christians. The book covers women preachers in Wesley's lifetime, the reason why some Methodist sects allowed women to preach and others did not, and the experience of Bible Christian and Primitive Methodist female evangelists before 1850. It also describes the many other ways in which women supported their chapel communities. The second half of the book includes the careers of mid-century women revivalists, the opportunities, home and foreign missions offered for female evangelism, the emergence of deaconess evangelists and Sisters of the People in late century, and the brief revival of female itinerancy among the Bible Christians.

Jennifer Lloyd

later remembered Lois Malpas as ‘the picture of health, a typical English farmer’s daughter, ready for any kind deed, never happier than when helping someone, everything she did was done heartily, a ring of sincerity in her praise and prayer. No one ever doubted the goodness of such a soul.’2   206   LLoyd_03_chap 5-8.indd 206 17/09/2009 10:05 women in missions at home and abroad In 1886 the first two Bible Christian missionaries arrived in the area. Initially sponsored by the China Inland Mission (CIM), Thomas Vanstone and Samuel T. Thorne, Mary O’Bryan Thorne

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

3 The heyday of female itinerancy M ary O’Bryan Thorne’s tombstone is next to her husband Samuel’s, flush with the wall of what was once the Bible Christian chapel at Lake Farm, Shebbear, Devon, her home for twenty years of her life. It memorializes her as ‘wife of Samuel Thorne, printer, daughter of William O’Bryan, founder of the Bible Christians, among whom she was a minister sixty years.’ Mary O’Bryan was born on Gunwen Farm, Cornwall, in 1807, eldest daughter of Catherine and William O’Bryan. Catherine, herself an educated and independent woman, was

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

:04 women and the shaping of british methodism anew in some of the sects that appeared after Wesley’s death, particularly in those concentrating their efforts in borderland areas not yet reached by Methodist preachers. As in early Methodism itself, these borderland sects emphasized evangelism. They often borrowed techniques from preachers on the American frontier, speaking in informal settings in the open air or barns to large crowds or to small groups in people’s houses. In 1815 William O’Bryan, founder of the Bible Christians, formalized his break from Wesleyan

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

4 Philanthropists, volunteers, fund-raisers, and local preachers I n 1889 Sarah Mary Babbage Terrett, Bible Christian founder of the English White Ribbon temperance organization, suddenly collapsed and died while attending a meeting at which she was a featured speaker. The shock and sense of loss must have been considerable because she was well known for her stirring addresses – on the third anniversary of the White Ribbon campaign she quoted Nelson and Tennyson’s Charge of the Light Brigade to call on ‘all engaged in this glorious work, in the name and

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Abstract only
Jennifer Lloyd

Introduction In 1862 Mary O’Bryan Thorne wrote in her diary: ‘At our East Street anniversary I spoke at 11, and Serena [her daughter] at 2:30 and 6; one was converted in the evening.’1 She regarded this as a routine engagement, something she had been doing for more than forty years and that her daughter had every right to continue. Thorne was the daughter of the founder of the Bible Christian Connexion and a Bible Christian local preacher. Women preached regularly in the Bible Christian (1815–1907) and the Primitive Methodist Connexions (1807–1934), both

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Abstract only
Jennifer Lloyd

crag and on clear days see the distant sea on both Cornish coasts. According to his grandson and biographer, among the granite boulders are ‘altar stones and other remains of the Druids,’ and a cave called Lady Bridget’s Parlour.1 I learned the secrets of the tor from Margaret Rundle, one of a family who had lived for generations next to the chapel built on O’Bryan’s land – in the mid-nineteenth century a Rundle emigrated to New Zealand, taking the Bible Christian faith with him.2 Margaret never mentioned Druids or Lady Bridget. Instead, she showed me where to find

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

, she also quoted St. Paul’s ‘there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus (Gal. iii.28),’ not a text used in previous justifications. Her arguments concentrated on more recent examples of female preaching among the Quakers, the Salvation Army, Primitive Methodists, and Bible Christian women. She noted that the American temperance leader Frances Willard spent much of her life speaking in public, and that both the holiness movement and the recent Welsh revival often had women on the platform. She believed that theological training should be open

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Jennifer Lloyd

5 Women as Revivalists S erena Thorne was born in 1842, the ninth of Mary O’Bryan and Samuel Thorne’s thirteen children. She grew up in a tense household; her parents were often at odds, Samuel’s business ventures, including the Bible Christian Connexional printing company, did not go well, and he alienated his elder sons. Perilous family finances probably meant her education was largely at home. The surviving portions of her mother’s diary do not record her conversion, but at age eleven Mary thought her ‘very pious.’ Her sister remembered her as ‘lively and

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
Philip Payton

tolerance. As he wrote to his brother: ‘Go then’ I said ‘… and make for yourself a career in a new world of your own creation, and be assured that in seeking in this manner to advance your own interests, you will confer a great and lasting benefit 298 british and irish diasporas upon your natural country’. And this advice which I have given to him, I give to all persons who find this island too thickly populated.77 Methodists, in their several denominational guises – principally Wesleyans, Bible Christians and Primitive Methodists – along with other Nonconformists

in British and Irish diasporas